i feel so lost
i feel so alone
like time is gone
and i’m all
on my own
—  t.m.
Her body is not your bedroom, it is not a place for you to rest your weary head and then leave in a mess in search of greater adventures. Her body is a home, but not for you, it is a sanctuary for her and her alone.
—  Nikita Gill

“If I’d’ve known that would be the last hug you ever gave me, I would’ve held on longer.”

- D.N. // excerpt from a book i’ll never write #189

How to Make Your Descriptions Less Boring

We’ve all been warned about the dangers of using too much description. Readers don’t want to read three paragraphs about a sunset, we’re told. Description slows down a story; it’s boring and self-indulgent. You should keep your description as short and simple as possible. For those who take a more scientific approach to writing fiction, arbitrary rules abound: One sentence per paragraph. One paragraph per page. And, for god’s sake, “Never open a book with weather” (Elmore Leonard).

But what this conventional wedding wisdom fails to take into account is the difference between static and dynamic description. Static description is usually boring. It exists almost like a painted backdrop to a play. As the name suggests, it doesn’t move, doesn’t interact or get interacted with.

There were clouds in the sky.
Her hair was red with hints of orange.
The house had brown carpeting and yellow countertops.

In moderation, there’s nothing wrong with static description. Sometimes, facts are facts, and you need to communicate them to the reader in a straightforward manner.

But too much static description, and readers will start to skim forward. They don’t want to read about what the house looks like or the stormy weather or the hair color of each of your protagonist’s seventeen cousins.

Why? Because they can tell it’s not important. They can afford to skip all of your description because their understanding of the story will not be impacted.

That’s where dynamic description comes in. Dynamic description is a living entity. It’s interactive, it’s relevant. It takes on the voices of your narrators and characters. In short, it gives us important information about the story, and it can’t be skimmed over.

So how do you make your description more dynamic so that it engages your readers and adds color and excitement to your story? Here are a few tips.

(I have a TON more tips about setting and description. These are just a few. But I’m trying to keep this short, so if you have any questions or want more advice about this, please feel free to ask me.)

Keep reading

You are
the kindest person
I have ever known,
not because of your words
or what you’ve done
but because you always
used to bring out
the best me
I could be.
—  // –
j.d.m.
Her mother told her she could grow up to be anything she wanted be, so she grew up to become the strongest of the strong, the strangest of the strange, the wildest of the wild, the wolf leading wolves.
—  Nikita Gill, For The Red Riding Hood Who Was The Wolf

“In a perfect world, you would love me the way I love you.”

- D.N. // excerpt from a book i’ll never write #188

mom thinks i’m bright
but not vivid enough to illuminate the world
to her, i am merely a firefly trapped in a mason jar
i just wish she’d poke holes in the lid 
- not only because she’s suffocating me -
but so i could at least pretend they’re stars
—  smspoetry
How do you know you’re happy? Truely happy? And not just pleased with a situation or satisfied with a result?“ I asked.
He thought of his answer for a moment and a shy smile was tugging on the corners of his lips, "When you aren’t living for the week ends any longer, when a Tuesday feels just as worthy as a Saturday and when you fall asleep easily on a Sunday night, that’s when you know it’s permanent.
—  // excerpt from a story I’ll never write
j.d.m.
she tried to escape everything
but it didn’t matter how hard she tried
she stayed a shadow of her past
it’s still written on her skin
—  t.m.

I am teaching myself how to take up space. How to not apologise constantly for the way I live and breathe. How an apology isn’t something I am supposed to say before I speak in a conversation. How  I’m so sorry, isn’t something I have to say before I just allow myself the basic right of speaking about anything.

I am teaching myself that I am allowed to exist on this planet without thinking of myself as a burden. How to not apologise for things that are out of my control. How to understand when people are trying to manipulate me into thinking the worst of myself and most of all how to stop thinking the very worst of myself as I deserve better than that from myself.


I am teaching myself that humans can exist without assuming the very worst about themselves and how the people around them perceive them. How to not apologise when someone bumps into me and I immidiately assume it is my fault. How to not apologise when I ask a question because I think others will think I am stupid. How to love myself for these flawed bits of me no one has ever wanted to love before.


I am teaching myself that all the lies my abusers told me about myself were so very wrong. How I am allowed to make mistakes. How as long as I apologise and amend things, anything is fixable if I still have love in my heart for the other person. How not everything that has ever gone wrong in every relationship is my fault.


I am finally learning how to take up space as a human being. It’s taken a long, long road to get here. And I still have a very long way to go before I am done understanding that it is my job to take up space, that I am not just an afterthought or a secondary character in this gift of life I have been given. That who I am is not an apology, that who I am is not wrong.

—  Nikita Gill, On Learning How To Take Up Space

“why should i be expected to put my womanhood in a straitjacket when it’s men who cannot keep their hands to themselves?”

- smspoetry (burn your fucking bra)

unusual character stuff? part 2
  • doesn’t know the official names for dogbreeds but has their own names for them (etc. grumpy dog, big snowfluff, golden boy, spot™)
  • collects patches for their signature piece of clothing
  • refuses to run
  • mainly draws one collection of things (etc. mushrooms, gadgets, backs, dinosaurs, statues, sea creatures, clothing, trees, goats…)
  • horrible at spelling
  • gullible as heck
  • always has small wounds on their hands
  • flinches at loud sounds
  • knows way to much about how to get away with murder
  • always has to make a cool entrance
  • gets nauseous a lot but never pukes
  • stress sweats a lot
  • asks inappropriate questions without realizing they’re inappropriate
  • not good at showing sympathy or comforting people (still can be a good person!! just not their area okay)
  • writes notes and to-do’s on their hands and arms
  • collects blackmail and secrets about everyone
  • has a really loud laugh (bonus: and gets self-conscious about it)
  • has an obsession with words
  • has a very strange google history
  • cuts their own hair
  • uses a lot of 1920′s slang (bee’s knees, heebie-jeebies, cat’s pajamas…)
  • doesn’t understand how to use chopsticks
  • super innocent when it comes to sexual stuff and is very easily traumatized
  • makes jokes out of every situation
  • needs a few minutes every morning to calm down after their bad dreams
  • the ultimate loyal friend™
  • wants to be a detective
  • should not, under any circumstances, be trusted behind the wheel
  • irresponsible when it comes to their body and injuries (”eh, it’ll heal on it’s own” “at least put a bANDAID ON IT!”)
  • cheats at every possible game
  • has to take very long bus-rides to their work/school
  • Gets so occupied with examining their surroundings that they often walk into things
  • has a super good sense of smell
  • likes to put their feet up on things
  • wears glasses that make their eyes look smaller/larger
  • has a dad™ look
  • only owns 1 pair of shoes
  • has a habit of doodling on every surface they can find
  • always the first one to wake up
  • Talks a lot, even when nobody’s listening
  • Somehow gets away with the weirdest crap
  • makes up words and just expects others to understand what the hell they’re talking about
  • gets easily out of touch with reality
  • addicted to stationary
  • can draw a perfect circle (that’s a flippin’ superpower)
  • looks like a certain cartoon character and hates when people point it out
  • overuses the word ‘hate’
  • never ties their shoelaces