Conflict-area

SYRIA, ALEPPO - A Syrian girl arrives at her school in Aleppo’s rebel-held eastern district of Shaar on May 7, 2016.
Displaced families returned home and schools reopened in rebel-held districts of Aleppo after a truce was extended for 72 hours in the battleground northern city. / AFP PHOTO / KARAM AL-MASRI                        

Au-

Kisara is from a rather worn torn place in Egypt, a war to which she lost all her family to and it’s known that Kaiba corp supplied weapons to it at one point before suddenly becoming a gaming company.

Eventually she some how got to Japan (idk I guess someone found her and maybe decided to take her in)

Her japanese isn’t completely perect, sometimes slipping back into her native tongue but she is fluent in it.

At first she isn’t overly fond of Seto at first, well more the Kaiba name since she knows that Kaiba corp was one of the top weapons distributors or whatever during the conflict that took away her family.

eventually though she realizes it’s wrong to be angry at and blame him for those things even though he shares the Kaiba name.

Though after hearing her story Kaiba decides to do somethings to like idk maybe create a fund or something to help those in war zones. Like a reliefe fund kind thing or whatever(My mind is blanking on the actual word I’m searching for)

Kisara would be iffy around people and well incredibly jumpy person

Kaiba’s really the only person she’s ever opened up too and eventually feels safe around.

She’s haunted by nightmares of losing her family and the war.

npr.org
Why Doctors Without Borders Is Skipping The World Humanitarian Summit
The group pulled out this month, citing concerns that nations won't have to follow through on commitments made at the summit. We spoke with executive director Jason Cone.

“The summit has become a fig-leaf of good intentions” that won’t actually improve any of the “weaknesses in humanitarian action and emergency response, particularly in conflict areas or epidemic situations.”  – OUCH

When true humanitarians are not backed up, people, many people will suffer.

“Thailand is among the world’s most dangerous countries in which to oppose powerful interests that profit from coal plants, toxic waste dumping, land grabs or illegal logging. Some 60 people who spoke out on these issues have been killed over the past 2 decades. @lukedugglebyphoto photographed portraits of 37 of these largely obscure victims — often people involved small-scale conflicts in remote areas — at the site of the murder or abduction. Montha Chukaew, 54, and Pranee Boonrat, 50, pictured here, were shot and killed in November 2012, while on their way to a market. They were members of the Southern Peasants’ Federation of Thailand, which fights for the Khlong Sai Pattana community’s right to agricultural land. “For simple farmers to rise up against powerful people is really quite amazing, and daring,” @lukedugglebyphoto told the @nytimes #lensblog. “What it comes down to is, it’s their village. There’s a real sense of home, and where they were born and live is very important; for most people that’s all they have.”” By nytimes on Instagram.

World humanitarian summit urges better response to crisis

Ankara, May 23 (IANS) The first world humanitarian summit opened in Turkey on Monday with United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urging governments, aid groups, the private sector and other stakeholders to act to improve the global humanitarian system.


In his opening remarks to the two-day summit, Ban called on the participants to make concrete commitments in five areas – conflict prevention and resolution, strengthening the protection of civilians, leaving no one behind, ending humanitarian need and ensuring funding for humanitarian actions, Xinhua news agency reported.

He put a particular emphasis on the issue of displaced populations, calling on the world to significantly reduce the number of the displaced in the years to come.

“I urge you to commit to halving the number of internally displaced people by 2030, and to find better long-term solutions for refugees and displaced people based on more equal sharing of responsibilities,” he said. “We are here to shape a different future.”

Also addressing the opening ceremony, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan cited the heavy burden on Turkey in tackling the Syrian refugee crisis and stressed the need to revamp the global humanitarian system.

“The current system fails to meet the demands in the face of emergency problems and fails to develop solutions. Only certain countries take the responsibility,” he said. “From now on everyone should share the burden.”

“We have to adopt a new system that would put the human beings at the centre,” he said.

Turkey’s aid to refugees has already exceeded $10 billion, while the international community’s support stopped at $455 million, Erdogan said, adding that he hoped “the summit will be a turning point.”

Also on Monday, dozens of people protested outside the venue of the summit and 12 of them were detained by police, according to local media reports.

Attending the summit are some 5,200 participants, including 65 heads of state and government and representatives from crises-affected communities, NGOs, the private sector and UN agencies, according to figures released by the United Nations.

Of the 192 UN member states, 177 are represented at the summit.

–IANS

lok/dg

I remeber reading a comment on environmental studies saying it was a recruiting tool for Hippie Communists because in the textbook it keeps saying in regards to land use conflicts that areas like nature reserves and national parks are more important than mines and power plants and I’m sad I never screen shot it because it still makes me laugh thinking about it

Much attention is focused on drones as ‘eyes in the sky’. However for people on the ground, the sound of the drones is much more pervasive. Military drones fly at high altitudes and are more often heard than seen. The word drone itself is rooted in sound, referring to the noise of the male honeybee. The sound of drones in areas of conflict create frightening soundscapes that go on for many hours on end. The sound gives them nicknames like Zanana (buzz) in Palestine.

In this project, designer Ruben Pater (Drone Survival Guide) and composer Gonçalo F. Cardoso (Discrepant) join hands to focus on the auditive aspects of drones. What engines do drones have, and what do they sound like? Side A (as featured on this playlist) features recordings of 17 drone types, ranging from small consumer drones to large military drones, as contemporary bird songs.

elderofziyon.blogspot.com
HRW lies again about international law


From the New York Times:

Sari Bashi, a spokeswoman for Human Rights Watch and expert on international law regarding warfare, said that building tunnels in residential neighborhoods was not explicitly prohibited. But she said militant groups had “an obligation to take all feasible measures to protect civilians, including not taking the armed conflict to civilian areas, to the extent possible.”

Here’s what the ICRC has to say:

Under the Statute of the International Criminal Court, “utilizing the presence of a civilian or other protected person to render certain points, areas or military forces immune from military operations” constitutes a war crime in international armed conflicts.[

The prohibition of using human shields in the Geneva Conventions, Additional Protocol I and the Statute of the International Criminal Court are couched in terms of using the presence (or movements) of civilians or other protected persons to render certain points or areas (or military forces) immune from military operations.

It can be concluded that the use of human shields requires an intentional co-location of military objectives and civilians or persons hors de combat with the specific intent of trying to prevent the targeting of those military objectives.

Why is HRW, which normally errs on the side of protecting civilians when interpreting international law, suddenly deciding to rule against Gaza civilians and for the Hamas terrorists who are deliberately digging tunnels underneath Gaza civilian homes?

Is there really any fundamental legal difference between forcing civilians to be herded to a military site (which is the restrictive way HRW defines human shielding) and placing the military target directly under the homes of civilians, who have nowhere else to go?

We saw this a lot during Operation Protective Edge. Over a dozen Hamas violations of internatinal law were all but ignored by “human rights” groups whose very job is to protect civilians being placed at risk from Hamas actions.

Apparently, when Israel is on the other side, HRW chooses to look the other way for all but the most egregious Hamas crimes.

And the losers are Gaza civilians.




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Tom Hiddleston shares childhood snap in support of education campaign

Tom Hiddleston has recently hit Twitter to show support for Unicef in their campaign to celebrate the importance of schools in crisis in conflict areas.

Seed contributions from ICARDA in Syria stored in the world seed vault in Svalbard, Norway. ICARDA had replicated over 80% of its collection to Svalbard from its GeneBank in Aleppo, Syria after the conflict in the area made the regeneration and distribution activities not only difficult but impossible under the circumstances. 

At refugee camps, birth control is crucial and in short supply

The need for family planning among migrants and refugees is well known (pdf). This population is at a higher risk of unwanted pregnancies and has less knowledge of, and access to, contraception. For women living in refugee camps, unwanted pregnancy adds hardship to an already terrible situation, and yet reproductive issues are hardly addressed as a priority in refugee camps, or conflict areas.

Currently, birth control options are scarce for refugees both in Turkey and Greece. According to the United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA), there were half a million pregnancies in 2015 among Syrian women living at home and as refugees. It its guidelines, the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) highlights how providing reproductive health care to refugees is “crucial for the mental and social well being of any individual” (pdf, p.9), but providing family planning on the ground remains a challenge.

DKT Turkey, an arm of DKT International, a social marketing organization focused on providing affordable condoms and other forms of birth control, is trying to help. Since 2009, it DKT has marketed condoms, IUDs, and birth control at lower prices than those provided by multinational brands by producing and importing its own products.

“Because the [Greek] government is focused on other subjects,” Yakup Aydogan, director of DKT Turkey, told Quartz, “family planning for refugees is not a priority.” He says DKT was contacted by Circle of Health International (COHI), an organization providing relief to refugees in Lesbos, in January and agreed to provide 10,000 condoms for free—but shipping them to Lesbos was a long and costly process: from İzmir, where DKT is based, to Istanbul, then onto to Athens and, after custom clearance, Lesbos. To speed it up, the shipment was sent to an address in Ayvalık, a coastal town in Turkey, where it was picked up by a member of COHI, who travelled back with all 10,000 condoms via ferry to Lesbos, where the organization began distributing them in February.

“We have millions of refugees in Turkey, too,” says Aydogan, pointing the lack of of contraception for migrants settled in Turkey. Earlier this year, he says, DKT received a similar call to COHI’s from a doctor working in a camp Kilis, Turkey, near the Syrian border: she asked for IUDs, and DKT so far sent 1,000.

It’s a drop in the sea, considering that over half of the hundreds of thousands of asylum seekers in Europe are between 18 and 34 years old. Children of refugees and migrants face great dangers, including that of ending up in trafficking and slave trade. According to Europe’s police agency Europol, at least refugee children are missing.

Sign up for the Quartz Daily Brief, our free daily newsletter with the world’s most important and interesting news.

More stories from Quartz:

The repercussions of the hospital bombing in Kunduz

The devastating attack on a hospital in Kunduz Afghanistan last year by US forces, in which 42 people were killed, provoked widespread condemnation and led to calls for an investigation into the way ‘safe zones’ are treated in conflict areas.

HRW lies again about international law

HRW’s Sari Bashi

From the

New York Times:

Sari Bashi, a spokeswoman for Human Rights Watch and expert on international law regarding warfare, said that building tunnels in residential neighborhoods was not explicitly prohibited. But she said militant groups had “an obligation to take all feasible measures to protect civilians, including not taking the armed conflict to civilian areas, to the extent possible.”

Here’s what the ICRC has to say:

Under the Statute of the International Criminal Court, “utilizing the presence of a civilian or other protected person to render certain points, areas or military forces immune from military operations” constitutes a war crime in international armed conflicts.[

The prohibition of using human shields in the Geneva Conventions, Additional Protocol I and the Statute of the International Criminal Court are couched in terms of using the presence (or movements) of civilians or other protected persons to render certain points or areas (or military forces) immune from military operations.

It can be concluded that the use of human shields requires an intentional co-location of military objectives and civilians or persons hors de combat with the specific intent of trying to prevent the targeting of those military objectives.

Why is HRW, which normally errs on the side of protecting civilians when interpreting international law, suddenly deciding to rule against Gaza civilians and for the Hamas terrorists who are deliberately digging tunnels underneath Gaza civilian homes?

Is there really any fundamental legal difference between forcing civilians to be herded to a military site (which is the restrictive way HRW defines human shielding) and placing the military target directly under the homes of civilians, who have nowhere else to go?

We saw this a lot during Operation Protective Edge. Over a dozen Hamas violations of internatinal law were all but ignored by “human rights” groups whose very job is to protect civilians being placed at risk from Hamas actions.

Apparently, when Israel is on the other side, HRW chooses to look the other way for all but the most egregious Hamas crimes.

And the losers are Gaza civilians.

via Elder Of Ziyon - Israel Newshttp://ift.tt/1TxiuTP