Computer-Drawings

thenorthernphoenix  asked:

Oh, what's wrong with your shoulder?? I hope it gets better soon!

i’ve strained the muscles from slouching @ my computer drawing all of the time! :( 

i’m actually trying to work on my posture & i’m seeing a massage therapist who has told me most of the muscles in the shoulder area are uhh, hypertonic?? so hopefully i can stop it from getting much worse.. 

i’m 23 why must my body fall apart

I like it here...

Only been following the @therealjacksepticeye and JSE related Tumblrs for about a week now, but there’s so many wonderful and talented people here!

Whether it’s drawings, paintings, computer-generated art, GIFS, PMA comments or more general written pieces, it’s all beautiful!

It’s genuinely heart-warming - seeing how much love there is and I love scrolling through everyone’s creations. Well done everyone on being so amazing! Keep the PMA going!

💮widdle commissions u say?💮

Hi hello there! I wanted to update my commission page again cause. the last one is damn old nkjvfndc,

I’m trying to save up for a computer and drawing tablet (waoh) and it’s gonna take. a whILE but that just means I need to do a lot of commissions! Prices and examples Down Below uwu


Keep reading

I drew a quick chart about good wrist and finger exercise before playing Splatoon (or engaging in any other intense activity such as but not limited to gaming in general, programming, drawing, computer work etc.)
As with all stretching exercise, these should only be done in moderate speed. You only want to loosen up, not break your hands!!

… and it kinda exploded on twitter haha

anonymous asked:

do you have an idea of a checklist for learning how to create digital art? like i know practice is essential, but i don't really know where to start or where to go from there. thanks so much xox

I think I can toss some stuff out here that might be of use.  Assuming an artist learning digital art starts from the beginning–owning a tablet & drawing program but not knowing how to use them–here’s an inconveniently long list of stuff that could help them.

TL;DR: 1, mess around till you’re used to drawing digitally. 2, study and create ad infinitum. 3, a bunch of tips that are pretty hard to TLDR so you should probably just go over em.  Step 2 is basically what you asked me NOT to tell you (“practice”!), but unfortunately it’s all I know how to do :,(

1) If you own a tablet that you plug into your computer (i.e., you don’t draw directly on the screen), feel free to spend a few weeks or even a month+ just getting used to it.  When you first start out, it’s really freaky drawing in one place and seeing things appear somewhere else, but trust me in that you won’t even notice the disconnect after a few months of consistent digital drawing.  I’ve been painting digitally for about 2 years now, and it’s actually slightly easier for me to draw digitally than traditionally.  [If you have a cintiq, or you use an iPad with Procreate, or something similar, then you probably don’t have to spend as much time in step 1.]

Keep in mind that it doesn’t matter how good you were with traditional drawing when you start digital; the mental disconnect you have will make it very difficult to think about proportions, values, edges, colors, etc.  You’ll probably notice yourself making mistakes that you wouldn’t normally make on paper.  Don’t worry about them, just keep drawing as you usually would.  Digital you will catch up to traditional you in time.  

For now, get used to blending colors, drawing somewhat steady lines that go in the correct direction, and fooling around with brushes and brush settings.  If you come across a brush that you like (easy to work with + pleasing results), it may help to stick with it as you continue to learn.  Digital doodles and sketches are good for this stage; though try to keep doing traditional work so your base art skills don’t atrophy.  

If you’re just starting out with Photoshop or Sai or Krita or whatever software you’re using, you’re gonna be intimidated by all the funky buttons and settings that you first see.  If it makes you feel any better, I use maybe 0.1% of the tools that Photoshop offers me.  When you start, all you need to worry about is the brush tool and control-z, maybe the eraser too.

2) Do studies as well as pieces from imagination.  You can move into step 2 as early as you please; you don’t have to wait until you think you’ve become “skillful” at digital drawing (in fact, this step is what will probably help you become the most comfortable with digital).  It’s alright if your colors are icky looking and your values are off (tip, occasionally turn the saturation of your drawing to 0 to check the values), because as long as you keep studying reality and appealing art & continually learn from your mistakes, you’ll get better. 

Always remember to study or at least appreciate the qualities of art you enjoy.  It’s the same thing that people always tell writers–you have to read a lot to write well.  You probably shouldn’t shield yourself from the influence of other artists; while you may think that this action would help you develop artistically in the manner most true to yourself, in reality the vast majority of the process of learning art will be honing in on what you find visually pleasant so that you may, in turn, express your artistic taste in your work.  If you look at other people’s art, you can pick out tiny aspects of it that you like and incorporate that into your style.  It’s a bit trickier to build a style without the “help” of other artists, though you can always turn to nature for help. On that note, I also recommend referencing nature as much as you can, because we as human beings are sort of wired to find natural designs, colors, and structures beautiful.  Look at nature for the universally beautiful, and look at art for the subjectively beautiful (i.e., enjoyed uniquely by you).

If you find yourself getting burnt out pretty quickly, then just paint/draw simple and small things for period of half an hour to 1 ½ hours a day (and switch back to traditional).  You can spend this time mapping out proportions, creating thumbnails of values/colors, drawing linework, or whatever.  Add complexity to your pieces as the months go by, and if you already have a decent foundation in drawing aim to create somewhat finished pieces after maybe four months to a year.  Please note that the second part of that sentence was something I completely made up out of my head, because I’m trying to quantify pretty unquantifiable concepts such as a “decent foundation in drawing” and a “somewhat finished” piece of art.  If you find it unrealistic, or just too easy of a goal, disregard it entirely.  It can take you half a decade to learn to make finished digital art, or you can get it down in a couple months.

3) Fun fact, there’s not really a step 3 as you stay in 2 forever, always studying and creating.  But there’s a few other things about digital art that you ought to know, so here they are:

• If your computer doesn’t make a fuss about it, I’d recommend working on a decently large canvas (at least 3000 by 3000; I personally prefer 6000 by 6000). You’ll get less defined edges and colors if you go below 1000 by 1000, from my experience.

• If you have a tablet with pressure sensitivity (you probably should otherwise digital painting is kinda hellish), go to your brush settings and set ‘transfer’ to ‘pen pressure.’  This is what makes it possible to blend.  

• If you’re having trouble matching colors while studying, you can always color pick the ref (in photoshop: bring the pic into PS and use the eye dropper tool) and compare its colors to your colors.  Some people add too much red to their skin tones, some people draw their highlights with overly desaturated colors, some people make trees and grass in their landscapes too green; whatever the case, take note of and correct errors that you consistently make.  

• Get used to using the transform/warp/liquify tools (liquify is technically a filter but you get what I mean).  They’re lifesavers for fixing proportion mistakes that you’ve only noticed 8 hours into a piece. 

• Give layers a shot.  I only work on one layer, but I’ve heard from people who divide their piece up into multiple layers that they’re damn useful (until you draw on the wrong one). 

• Flip your canvas horizontally every once in a while to make sure stuff hasn’t gone awry. 

• Screw around with color modes; they can do some really fancy things that are difficult to duplicate with normal digital painting, let alone traditional.  On the topic of colors, don’t be afraid to use somewhat desaturated colors (near the center of the color picker square in PS). There are some very aesthetically pleasing color combinations that you can make out of somewhat dulled colors.

• If you’re using PS, bind ‘step backward’ to control Z, not ‘undo.’  This is under keyboard shortcuts.  Set up a bunch of shortcuts that are the most convenient for you–personally, I only keep my left hand near the lower left region of my keyboard (my right hand is away from the keyboard and off to the right, drawing on the tablet), so I have all of my necessary shortcuts in that area.

This was a bit longer than I expected, but I figure that someone out there can get something out of it.  Cheers to you, if you do.

what if

That new LEGO Ninjago movie trailer seriously showed us A LOT of differences from the original series.

Thanks for making an actual AU, LEGO. 😂

anonymous asked:

I've been drawing for nine years now and have gotten considerably better since I started, but I find myself still struggling to get things right like facial features, bodies, and, my biggest problem, hands. This coming Spring I'm going to college for animation and illustration, but I just struggle so much that it makes me wonder how I could ever be successful in that area. I really want to do this, but I lack in many resources (I have a box of old crayolas and all of digital art is done on (1)

Don‘t worry, everyone struggles at first, mostly if you’re self-taught. I’m sure at college they’ll teach you the basics of drawing again before starting with more specific stuff (at least that’s how it worked at the school of comics)
But if you want to know some basic exercises I was given for human bodies and facial features, here there are:

the first thing to do is simplify figures, instead of starting drawing the body with anatomy right away, think of it as geometrical shapes put together


For the head there are these structures that might help you

For the hands, believe me, even the most expert artist on the earth has difficulties in drawing them.
But as the other parts, it helps to make a geometrical structure before

I do this

I’m not really that good at drawing hands but that’s the principle of it.

As exercise for human bodies and gestures, photos of athletes are really useful,

study their gesture drawing mannequins over photos

You can do the same exercise for faces and hands.


KEEP IN MIND THAT THESE ARE EXCERCISE TO DRAW REALISTIC BODIES.
STYLE COMES AFTER.
You can take all these “shortcuts” and modify the proportions to have the type of figure you want.


As for the equipment, I think if you want to go for animation you need at least a computer and a drawing tablet… For traditional illustrations you can use anything really

i saw this post at like 2am and i had to rush to my computer to draw this hell…..horrible jean passione