Compare-and-Contrast

3

Manga, 2003, and Brotherhood


Bonus:

Compare

My name is Lisa.

I’m five foot nine. My hair is long and it’s dark brown. I wear leather a great deal, high boots always, and sometimes glove-soft vests and even leather skirts now and then, and I wear lace, especially when I can find the kind I like: intricate, very old-fashioned lace, snow white. I have light skin that tans easily, large breasts, and long legs. And though I don’t feel beautiful and never have, I know that I am. If I wasn’t, I wouldn’t be a trainer at The Club.

Exit to Eden by Anne Rice (aka Rampling), 1985


Hi my name is Ebony Dark’ness Dementia Raven Way and I have long ebony black hair (that’s how I got my name) with purple streaks and red tips that reaches my mid-back and icy blue eyes like limpid tears and a lot of people tell me I look like Amy Lee (AN: if u don’t know who she is get da hell out of here!). I’m not related to Gerard Way but I wish I was because he’s a major fucking hottie. I’m a vampire but my teeth are straight and white. I have pale white skin. I’m also a witch, and I go to a magic school called Hogwarts in England where I’m in the seventh year (I’m seventeen). I’m a goth (in case you couldn’t tell) and I wear mostly black. I love Hot Topic and I buy all my clothes from there. For example today I was wearing a black corset with matching lace around it and a black leather miniskirt, pink fishnets and black combat boots. I was wearing black lipstick, white foundation, black eyeliner and red eye shadow. I was walking outside Hogwarts. It was snowing and raining so there was no sun, which I was very happy about. A lot of preps stared at me. I put up my middle finger at them.

My Immortal by Tara Gilesbie, 2006

3

watched the 13th warrior recently and doodled these guys.  it was fun drawing essentially the same character but adding as much variation as possible.

Keep reading

To help move away from summary and toward ANALYSIS, it’s important to incorporate strong verbs into your writing when discussing the writer’s rhetorical choices. Below is a list of verbs that are considered weak (imply summary) and a list of verbs that are considered strong (imply analysis). Strive to use the stronger verbs in your essays to help push yourself away from summary and toward analysis: ex “The writer flatters…” NOT “The writer says…”

Weak Verbs (Summary):

  • says 
  • explains
  • relates 
  • states 
  • goes on to say 
  • shows 
  • tells 
  • this quote shows

Strong Verbs (Analysis):

Argues, admonishes, analyzes, compares, contrasts, defines, demonizes, denigrates, describes, dismisses, enumerate, expounds, emphasizes, establishes, flatters, implies, lionizes, lists, minimizes, narrates, praises, processes, qualifies, questions, ridicules, suggests, supports, trivializes, vilifies, warns       

Powerful and Meaningful Verbs to Use in an Analysis (Alternatives to Show): 

  • Acknowledge, Address, Analyze, Apply, Argue, Assert, Augment
  • Broaden
  • Calculate, Capitalize, Characterize, Claim, Clarify,Compare, Complicate, Confine, Connect, Consider, Construct, Contradict, Correct, Create, Convince, Critique
  • Declare, Deduce, Defend, Demonstrate, Deny, Describe, Determine, Differentiate, Disagree, Discard, Discover, Discuss, Dismiss, Distinguish, Duplicate
  • Elaborate, Emphasize, Employ, Enable, Engage, Enhance, Establish, Evaluate, Exacerbate, Examine, Exclude, Exhibit, Expand, Explain, Exploit, Express, Extend
  • Facilitate, Feature, Forecast, Formulate, Fracture
  • Generalize, Group, Guide
  • Hamper, Hypothesize
  • Identify, Illuminate, Illustrate, Impair, Implement, Implicate, Imply, Improve, Include, Incorporate, Indicate, Induce, Initiate, Inquire, Instigate, Integrate, Interpret, Intervene, Invert, Isolate
  • Justify
  • Locate, Loosen
  • Maintain, Manifest, Manipulate, Measure, Merge, Minimize, Modify, Monitor
  • Necessitate, Negate, Nullify
  • Obscure, Observe, Obtain, Offer, Omit, Optimize, Organize, Outline, Overstate
  • Persist, Point out, Possess, Predict, Present, Probe, Produce, Promote, Propose, Prove, Provide
  • Qualify, Quantify, Question
  • Realize, Recommend, Reconstruct, Redefine, Reduce, Refer, Reference, Refine, Reflect, Refute, Regard, Reject, Relate, Rely, Remove, Repair, Report, Represent, Resolve, Retrieve, Reveal, Revise
  • Separate, Shape, Signify, Simulate, Solve, Specify, Structure, Suggest, Summarize, Support, Suspend, Sustain
  • Tailor, Terminate, Testify, Theorize, Translate
  • Undermine, Understand, Unify, Utilize
  • Validate, Vary, View, Vindicate
  • Yield  
2

comparing and contrasting 

I’m biased to no end, but I always did get a weird vibe from Peridot whenever we had a barn episode with Lapis. Sudden change in personality? Too much smiles? Too happy-go-lucky? Too much fanon cutesy gremlin peridot feel? I always thought I was just too attached to my own mental interpretation of Peridot and blind to actual canon Peridot, but now I can finally pin point my issue. 

Keep reading

Note taking tips

Notebook for each class. 

Have a separate notebook for each class. It keeps things organized. Plus, if you keep all of your classes’ notes in the same notebook and you lose that notebook, you’re pretty much SOL. Write clearly. If you’re going to handwrite your notes, make sure you can read them later. PenMANship. It’s got the word “man” in it, so it’s manly. Let go of perfectionism The purpose of note-taking is simple: to help you study better and more quickly. First, what’s new to you? There’s no point in writing down facts you already know. If you already know the Declaration of Independence was written and signed in 1776, there’s no reason to write that down. Anything you know you know you can leave out of your notes. Second, what’s relevant? What information is most likely to be of use later, whether on a test, in an essay, or in completing a project? Focus on points that directly relate to or illustrate your reading (which means you’ll have to have actually done the reading…). The kinds of information to pay special attention to are: 

* Dates of events: Dates allow you to 

  • a) create a chronology, putting things in order according to when they happened, and
  • b) understand the context of an event. For instance, knowing Isaac Newton was born in 1643 allows you to situate his work in relation to that of other physicists who came before and after him, as well as in relation to other trends of the 17th century.

 * Names of people: Being able to associate names with key ideas also helps remember ideas better and, when names come up again, to recognize ties between different ideas whether proposed by the same individuals or by people related in some way.

 * Theories: Any statement of a theory should be recorded — theories are the main points of most classes. 

* Definitions: Like theories, these are the main points and, unless you are positive you already know the definition of a term, should be written down. Keep in mind that many fields use everyday words in ways that are unfamiliar to us. 

 * Arguments and debates: Any list of pros and cons, any critique of a key idea, both sides of any debate related in class or your reading should be recorded. This is the stuff that advancement in every discipline emerges from, and will help you understand both how ideas have changed (and why) but also the process of thought and development within the particular discipline you are studying. 

* Images and exercises: Whenever an image is used to illustrate a point, or when an in-class exercise is performed, a few words are in order to record the experience. Obviously it’s overkill to describe every tiny detail, but a short description of a painting or a short statement about what the class did should be enough to remind you and help reconstruct the experience. 

 * Other stuff: Just about anything a professor writes on a board should probably be written down, unless it’s either self-evident or something you already know. Titles of books, movies, TV series, and other media are usually useful, though they may be irrelevant to the topic at hand; I usually put this sort of stuff in the margin to look up later (it’s often useful for research papers, for example). Pay attention to other student’s comments, too — try to capture at least the gist of comments that add to your understanding. 

* Your own questions: Make sure to record your own questions about the material as they occur to you. This will help you remember to ask the professor or look something up later, as well as prompt you to think through the gaps in your understanding. 

* Note-Taking Techniques: You don’t have to be super-fancy in your note-taking to be effective, but there are a few techniques that seem to work best for most people.

* Outlining: Whether you use Roman numerals or bullet points, outlining is an effective way to capture the hierarchical relationships between ideas and data. In a history class, you might write the name of an important leader, and under it the key events that he or she was involved in. Under each of them, a short description. And so on. Outlining is a great way to take notes from books, because the author has usually organized the material in a fairly effective way, and you can go from start to end of a chapter and simply reproduce that structure in your notes.For lectures, however, outlining has limitations. The relationship between ideas isn’t always hierarchical, and the instructor might jump around a lot. A point later in the lecture might relate better to information earlier in the lecture, leaving you to either 

  • a) flip back and forth to find where the information goes best (and hope there’s still room to write it in) 
  • b) risk losing the relationship between what the professor just said and what she said before. 
 

* Mind-mapping: For lectures, a mind-map might be a more appropriate way of keeping track of the relationships between ideas. Here’s the idea: in the center of a blank sheet of paper, you write the lecture’s main topic. As new sub-topics are introduced (the kind of thing you’d create a new heading for in an outline), you draw a branch outward from the center and write the sub-topic along the branch. Then each point under that heading gets its own, smaller branch off the main one. When another new sub-topic is mentioned, you draw a new main branch from the center. And so on. The thing is, if a point should go under the first heading but you’re on the fourth heading, you can easily just draw it in on the first branch. Likewise, if a point connects to two different ideas, you can connect it to two different branches. If you want to neaten things up later, you can re-draw the map or type it up 

 * The Cornell System: The Cornell System is a simple but powerful system for increasing your recall and the usefulness of your notes. About a quarter of the way from the bottom of a sheet of paper, draw a line across the width of the page. Draw another line from that line to the top, about 2 inches (5 cm) from the right-hand edge of the sheet. You’ve divided your page into three sections. In the largest section, you take notes normally — you can outline or mind-map or whatever. After the lecture, write a series of “cues” into the skinny column on the right, questions about the material you’ve just taken notes on. This will help you process the information from the lecture or reading, as well as providing a handy study tool when exams come along: simply cover the main section and try to answer the questions. In the bottom section, you write a short, 2-3 line summary in your own words of the material you’ve covered. Again, this helps you process the information by forcing you to use it in a new way; it also provides a useful reference when you’re trying to find something in your notes later. Charting Method If your professor’s lecture will be focused on comparing and contrasting two or more ideas, you might consider using the charting method. Create a table in the note-taking program you’re using. Make as many columns as there are categories that you’re comparing and contrasting. Label each column with a category. As you listen to the lecture, record the notes under the appropriate category.

We often waste an incredible amount of time wanting to be somewhere else, someone else. Our head-space gets clogged with compare, contrast, what if, why can’t, I should. But you’re never getting this time back. You can’t borrow tomorrow. Please don’t save the best for last. The best is all of you, here, where you are, brightly lit and painfully now, in this breath you’re leaving. Each second dies as it is born; every hello must say goodbye; all is fading in the collapsing hallway of a fragile hourglass, a grain at a time. You are here. The best is you, now.

Okay but you know what’s a trait of Keith’s that I want to hear more of?

Show me his attention to detail.

Everyone jokes about his “conspiracy board” but nobody seems to consider it’s not a conspiracy board? Like- he put a map down and figured out roughly where the energy source was, and then specifically went to locations and triangulated his weird brain sense to isolate it down to a specific area, and then when that led him to the caves, he took photographs of seemingly all the pictures he could find and used strings to mark their positions in what caves.

There was other stuff there we don’t know why he put up (something he later tore down, and a star chart) but none of this suggests he was making wild leaps of logic or conclusions about whatever it “must be” and his recounting of it is all incredibly matter-of-fact. Virtually nothing is conjecture except the safest ones- “like some kind of energy was telling me to search,” which is rooted in his experiences and not something he can quantify though he clearly tried as much as he could to do so- “they all appear to tell a slightly different story about a blue lion” would suggest that he went over those pictures and carefully compare/contrasted them. 

This suggests Keith is actually good at making detailed observations, and recording and organizing them in a very clear-cut accessible manner. This may well have taken him months to put together but he’s able to present it very quickly and effectively to the team.

Seemingly, something reinforced, because right after he sees Ulaz’s weapon and hears about what it’s for, we see him privately comparing it to the symbol on his own weapon.

Anti & Dark

Anti– animal, born and bred to be evil, natural hunter, hides away in shadows, moves quickly and abrupt, hardly seen but heard, filled with unstoppable adrenaline from his ‘chase’ causing uncontainable pleasure=laughing and giggling when making tricks and japes, ‘kill or be killed’, goes for the kill, no suffering for his prey= ‘gets the job done’, puerile= no logic or reason to his tactics and likely to blame others for his actions (e.g. “It’s all your fault!”)  

Dark– human, twisted into evil by past experiences, stalks his prey, illusions and manipulation, luring victims into a trap, takes his time (e.g. “I’ve been waiting patiently.”), slow and careful movements, stable mined= able to contain excitement, two-faced, callous and sadistic, likes to watch his prey struggle, logical= sees himself as the alpha and a genius, likes to give options to trick and tease his victims (e.g. “I’ll give you a choice.”) just extending their suffering. 

... Somehow, Still Talking About This Captain America Shit (Now With Bonus Spider-Man and Agents of SHIELD)

So now Secret Empire has revealed its Shyamalan Twist and given the readers a Good Guy Steve Rogers as well as Hydra Cap, and the kinds of dickbags who, when this whole bullshit began were dismissing people’s complaints with “oh come on, don’t you know how comics works, it’s all going to be put back at the end, blah blah blah…” are crowing I-Told-You-So’s.

But here’s the thing:

Yeah, fucknuts.  We always knew this.

Keep reading

FMA Manga/Brotherhood Ed: Not only will I never make a Philosopher’s Stone, I will never use one that’s already been made, even though the damage is done and can never be reversed.

I’m so disgusted by the idea of it that I would rather be eaten by Envy than attack what’s left the people of Xerxes who all but died hundreds of years ago. When I do use some of those souls to escape starving to death in a river of blood, I’m going to be wracked with guilt about it, even though it was literally the only way for me to save my friend Ling and for me to return to my brother.  

And will I use the remaining life force of a man I hate, who’s already been alive for way to long, who won’t be alive much longer, and who is offering his life up voluntarily to save the person in this world who I care about the most? Of course not! What a ridiculous idea! That would be wrong.

FMA 2003 Ed: In the end, I won’t end up murdering a whole room full of people to make a Philosopher’s Stone and save Alphonse…

..but I’m going to seriously consider it.

Tips for Learning Tarot

✨The best way to learn is to start using your cards! Don’t feel like you have to memorize all of the cards before you start reading them – it’s absolutely fine to look up definitions as you go!

✨Instead of trying to learn all 78 definitions at once, break it up into sections. I’d recommend starting with the Major Arcana, because they are definitely more self-explanatory than the Minor Arcana. As you start studying the cards, always keep in mind that the goal is to understand the cards instead of memorize them.

✨When you’re ready to move onto the Minor Arcana, I would first focus on the difference between each of the suits. What characteristics and elements are related to each? For example, the Cups deal with relationships emotional journeys, while the Swords deal with intellectual ones.

✨Just like each suit has a common characteristic, each court and numbered card has a similar theme; for instance, Aces represent new beginnings and potential.

✨I’ve found it very effective to learn the minor arcana by taking the same card from each suit, and compare and contrast the similarities and differences of each. Consider the “Tens;” which all represent some form of completion or finality. The Ten of Wands indicates you have worked hard and are now burdened with responsiblity, the Ten of Cups represents celebration, unity, and harmony, the Ten of Swords represents an unexpected defeat by betrayal, and the Ten of Pentacles represents fulfillment of a legacy after a long journey. While they all mean something different, there’s also lots of similarities to consider!

✨Always remember that there’s never one correct answer in tarot, and each card has countless interpretations. It’s always a good idea to use multiple sources (including your own intuition!) when learning the cards, so you can get as many perspectives and insights as possible. Also keep in mind that your interpretations of the cards may change and evolve over time, and that’s completely okay – it just means you’re learning!

✨As this post is already long enough, here’s a separate post listing my absolute favorite websites for learning tarot meanings!

I hope you found some of these tips helpful, best of luck! 💖

Debuting at TCAF 2017 - My Brother’s Husband, Volume 1 by Gengoroh Tagame

Translated by Anne Ishii
Published by Pantheon Books

From one of Japan’s most notable manga artists: a heartbreaking and redemptive tale of mourning and acceptance that compares and contrasts the contemporary nature of gay tolerance in the East and the West

Yaichi is a work-at-home suburban dad in contemporary Tokyo, married to wife Natsuki, father to young daughter Kana. Their lives are suddenly upended with the arrival at their doorstep of a hulking, affable Canadian named Mike Flanagan, who declares himself the widower of Yaichi’s estranged gay twin, Ryoji. Mike is on a quest to explore Ryoji’s past, and the family reluctantly but dutifully takes him in. What follows is an unprecedented, revelatory look at and journey into the largely still-closeted Japanese gay culture: how it’s been affected by the West, and how the next generation has the chance to change the preconceptions of and prejudices against it.

“When a cuddly Canadian comes to call, Yaichi—a single Japanese dad—is forced to confront his painful past. With his young daughter Kana leading the way, he gradually rethinks his assumptions about what makes a family. Renowned manga artist Gengoroh Tagame turns his stunning draftsmanship to a story very different from his customary fare, to delightful and heartwarming effect.”
—Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home