Colonel-Shaw

Brigadier “Mad” Mike Calvert (left) gives orders to Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw, while Major James Lumley stands with M1 carbine under his arm, after the capture of Mogaung in Burma during the second Chindit expedition, June 1944 [800 × 590]

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Effects of Canister Shot in the Civil War

This skull was discovered in 1876 on Morris Island, South Carolina, near the site of Battery Wagner, a powerful earthwork fort that had protected the entrance to Charleston Harbor during the Civil War.

The skull belonged to a man of African descent—a soldier of the famous 54th Massachusetts Volunteers, which had led the assault on Wagner on the night of July 18, 1863. Of approximately 600 men who made the charge, 256 were killed, wounded, or missing.

From the size of the wound, and the remains of the projectile itself, it can be determined what type of munition hit this man: an iron canister ball from one of two field howitzers known to have been used in the repulse of that attack.

 Had the 54th charged straight ahead, it would have been up and over and right into the heart of the fort. Unfortunately, commander Colonel Robert G. Shaw led the regiment to the left, against the lower, but heavily defended, center of the wall. Besides the four 32-pounders directly ahead, the mass of attacking men was subject to enfilading fire from the two recovered field howitzers above them. The regiment clung to the face of the fort for almost an hour, but eventually had to retire. Approximately 6000 more Union troops eventually were thrown into the battle to no avail. Wagner remained in Confederate hands for another four months, then was evacuated when its purpose had been achieved.

Source Credit: http://www.medicalmuseum.mil/index.cfm?p=exhibits.canistershotcivilwar.index This Web site provides an introduction to the National Museum of Health and Medicine (NMHM) and contains official Government information. Its use is intended for members of the general public, news media and Army Medical Department beneficiaries.

Second Photo: Confederate 12 lb Canister Round.

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Colonel Robert Gould Shaw of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry-

An Original Article – Harper’s Weekly – August 15, 1863

(Click to enlarge and read article) “None Knew Him But to Love Him”

The Last Night of Robert Gould Shaw~

1837–63, Union hero in the American Civil War, b. Boston. An ardent white abolitionist, he was colonel of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, the first body of black troops raised in a free state. He was killed leading the regiment in the attack on Fort Wagner, Charleston, S.C. A sculptured figure of him by Augustus Saint-Gaudens is on Boston Common. Portrayed in the Film “Glory” by Mathew Broderick.

"There they march, warm-blooded champions of a better day for man. There on horseback among them, in his very habit as he lived, sits the blue-eyed child of fortune, upon whose happy youth every divinity had smiled … " Oration by William James at the exercises in the Boston Music Hall, May 31, 1897, upon the unveiling of the Shaw Monument.

http://teachhistory.com/2010/02/28/colonel-shaw-sergeant-carney-and-the-54th-massachusetts/shawcombo1-2/

anonymous asked:

I promise it's true. Ask Colonel Shaw about it. Demand the truth from him. I don't want to be a snitch, but this had gone on for long enough.

I don’t wish to meddle in such matters. It is not my place to do so, as a matter of fact. I will just allow Colonel Shaw to deal with things as he sees fit. I trust the young man’s judgement.

Robert Gould Shaw (October 10, 1837 – July 18, 1863) 

As Colonel, he commanded the all-black 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, which entered the war in 1863. He was killed in the Second Battle of Fort Wagner, near Charleston, South Carolina.
He is the principal subject of the 1989 film Glory, where he is portrayed by Matthew Broderick.

In theory it may seem all right to some, but when it comes to being made the instrument of the Lord’s vengeance, I myself don’t like it. ~Robert Gould Shaw 

Color By Stacey@Civil War Parlor

 

Watch on arwyninamaranthine.tumblr.com

Still celebrating by remember a trip I took for my high school senior graduations. I have a feeling I am either about to gain or lose followers, haha!

Robert Gould Shaw 1837–1863 The Principal Subject of the 1989 Film Glory, Where He is Portrayed by Matthew Broderick.

As Colonel, he commanded the all-black 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, which entered the war in 1863. He was killed in the Second Battle of Fort Wagner, near Charleston, South Carolina.

The victorious Confederates buried him in a mass grave with many of his men, an act they intended as an insult. Following the battle, commanding Confederate General Johnson Hagood returned the bodies of the other Union officers who had died, but left Shaw’s where it was. Hagood informed a captured Union surgeon that “had he been in command of white troops, I should have given him an honorable burial; as it is, I shall bury him in the common trench with the negroes that fell with him.” Although efforts were made to recover Shaw’s body (which had been stripped and robbed prior to burial), Shaw’s father publicly proclaimed that he was proud to know that his son was interred with his troops, befitting his role as a soldier and a crusader for social justice. In a letter to the regimental surgeon, Lincoln Stone, Frank Shaw wrote:

"We would not have his body removed from where it lies surrounded by his brave and devoted soldiers….We can imagine no holier place than that in which he lies, among his brave and devoted followers, nor wish for him better company. – what a body-guard he has!"

Dear Wikipedia,

Please do not imply that Colonel Robert Gould Shaw had a “deep relationship” (now removed thanks to me, yeah. I’ll admit it) with Charlotte Forten under the section about his marriage, when I have found no evidence to support such. Her own wikipedia page doesn’t use those quotes, and in her diary entries I have managed to find there is nothing but admiration for the Colonel. If there was an affair, fine, but please provide the section with more information and a real citation. ‘Citation needed’ does not cut it for me when I have never come across anything of the sort.

If someone can prove me wrong, fine. That’s fine, but it doesn’t add up to me right now and I dislike seeing my hero misconstrued. 

Thanks. 

Annie Kneeland Haggerty, The Widow of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw

Colonel Shaw who was portrayed in the movie “Glory” met Annie at a pre Civil War opera party given by Shaw’s sister Susanna and were married on May 2, 1863.

She became a widow at the age of 28 when Col. Shaw was killed at Ft. Wagner. Annie’s story has for the most part been lost. The letters she wrote to Robert Shaw were burned by him at her request. After her husband’s death she lived abroad, she later returned to the US and was an invalid, her ailment is unknown, she never remarried.

The Last Time She Saw Him..

At 9 am, 1,007 black soldiers and 37 white officers of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment began a parade march through the streets of Boston in full dress uniform. Twenty-five-year-old Colonel Robert Gould Shaw rode at the head of the column. Twenty thousand people turned out to see the regiment off. Along the parade route were such dignitaries as Governor John A. Andrew, William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips and Frederick Douglass whose sons Charles and Lewis Douglass were members of the 54th. Robert Gould Shaw’s family, including his mother, two of his four sisters and his wife, stood on the second floor balcony of the Sturgis home located at 44 Beacon Street. 

When Colonel Shaw arrived at their location, he looked up and raised his sword to his lips. His seventeen-year-old sister Ellen, recalling how she felt about her brother Rob at that very moment, later wrote, “his face was as the face of an angel and I felt perfectly sure he would never come back.”

“The very flower of grace and chivalry, he seemed to me beautiful and awful, as an angel of God come down to lead the host of freedom to victory.”

- Poet John Greenleaf Whittier’s description of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw leading the 54th Massachusetts Regiment down Beacon Street and off to war.

http://teachhistory.com/tag/annie-haggerty/ Color By Stacey @CivilWarParlor TUMBLR

Barry Shaw - Colonel Richard Kemp urges UNHRC Not to be anti-Israel.

Barry Shaw – Colonel Richard Kemp urges UNHRC Not to be anti-Israel.

Colonel Richard Kemp submitted evidence into the conduct of Israel’s IDF forces and Hamas during the 2014 Gaza conflict to the United Nations Commission of Inquiry on February 20, 2015.

Barry Shaw

Kemp offered his close observations to the Commissioners as a neutral but experienced military expert having served as Commander of British Forces in Afghanistan and having commanded British troops in…

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Robert Gould Shaw-Photographed Before Enlistment

Colonel Shaw commanded the all-black 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, which entered the war in 1863. Portrayed by Matthew Broderick in the film “Glory”

"There they march, warm-blooded champions of a better day for man. There on horseback among them, in his very habit as he lived, sits the blue-eyed child of fortune, upon whose happy youth every divinity had smiled … " Oration by William James at the exercises in the Boston Music Hall, May 31, 1897, upon the unveiling of the Shaw Monument.

Despite his image in the 1989 film Glory, Robert Gould Shaw was a reluctant leader of the famous 54th Massachusetts Infantry, one of the first African American regiments in the Civil War. At the time he took command of the 54th in 1863, Shaw was 25 years old. 

Initially taking the command to appease his mother, Shaw eventually grew to respect his men and believed that they could fight as well as white soldiers. He was eager to get his men into action to prove this. When he learned that black soldiers were to receive less pay than whites, Shaw led a boycott of all wages until the situation was changed.  

http://robert.gould.shaw.gonetoosoon.org/memorial/

Please visit my new memorial page for Robert Gould Shaw on “Gone Too Soon” here you can leave notes and messages, give gifts and light a candle. 13 photos of Robert have been added.”

As Colonel, he commanded the all-black 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, which entered the war in 1863. He was killed in the Second Battle of Fort Wagner, near Charleston, South Carolina.

He is the principal subject of the 1989 film Glory.

Photo colorized by S.Palmer@CivilWarParlorTUMBLR