Cloud-Inversion

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Really nice field of sunflowers in front of Fuji, plus nice capture of a cloud layer at a single height.

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Early morning mist on the Derwent par Lee Smith
Via Flickr :
I set hiking about 1 and a half hours before sunrise to make sure I had plenty time to set up. Catbells is a really easy climb so within 30 minutes I was already at the top and ready to go. About 5 minutes into the ascent I knew it was going to be a great sunrise. The whole of Keswick was under a blanket of cloud with lovely clear skies above. This shot was taken shortly after sunrise when most of the cloud dispersed leaving a few thin patches that were catching the light just right.

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Nicely captured sea of clouds/inversion layer over the Bristol Channel, Ilfracombe, North Devon.

The Fabled Gate, by francisjtaylor

“The Fabled gate” When I arrived at the summit of Mam Tor someone had already beaten me to the gate, so I had to find a different composition further back along the path. Shortly after sunrise though they left, so I sprinted down and was able to capture this image before the sun disappeared behind the bank of cloud. I know it’s been done hundreds of times but I couldn’t resist with such great conditions!

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Sea of clouds over the Swiss Alps.

I’ve been plundering my rather substantial photographic vaults lately and came across this photo from New Years Eve 2008/2009. 

It’s me, practising a bit of weightlifting on Beinn a’ Bheithir before pitching the tent.

How’s the song go?  ‘I can move move move any mountain!’

A weekend above the clouds in foggy Fife

On Saturday I looked out the window on what I’d written off as a dreich old day up here in the Lomond Hills, and was surprised to see rays of sunshine blazing down.

I felt my heart skip a beat in excitement and within a few minutes had donned boots, gaiters and coat, and had my camera slung over my shoulder.  Why so excited?  Well, it had been foggy all day.  But when you start to see a little bit of brightness it means the fog is thinning and…..if you’re able to get a little bit higher up, you may well get above the cloud completely.

Events like that are fairly common here in the Lomonds.  We’re close to the Forth and are on the east coast, so there’s plenty of fog and haar rolling in off the North Sea when the east wind blows.  It can be a curse in summer of course, when everyone in Scotland is bathing under sunshine and blue skies, but along the eastern coastline it’s 10C and foggy.

But it can also be a real treat, because the scenes that present themselves to you as you climb through the cloud layer, are out of this world.

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Pre Digital Scotland

Cloud Inversion over Loch Tay - Summer 2003

Of all the places I’ve walked in Scotland, the hills north of Loch Tay seem to have a greater chance of cloud inversions than anywhere else I know.  I’ve had more there than I can count!