Clifden-Castle

Clifden Castle, Ireland

The castle was built by John D’Arcy (1785-1839) in a Gothic Revival style in the early 19th century. John was a man of drive, energy and determination. He founded Clifden in 1812 and built his castle around the same time. He was married twice and had fourteen children in all, leaving one to assume that this was a very full and noisy family home.

Following John’s death in 1839, the castle and town passed to his son and heir, Hyacinth. Like so many landlords in the West of Ireland, Hyacinth became bankrupt as a result of debts incurred during the Great Famine and in 1850 the town and castle went on sale.The new owners, the Eyre family from Bath in England, purchased the town and castle for £21,245. The Eyre’s lived at the castle until the 1920s when the lands were eventually purchased by the government and divided out among the tenants. Sadly, the castle had no outright owner and, in time, was stripped bare of its slates and timbers and eventually fell to ruin.

One of the interesting features of this property is the standing stones. D’Arcy had these stones erected to imitate other standing stones around Ireland. It isn’t unknown why he did this, but the stones have been surveyed and it has been determined that they are not as ancient as D’Arcy would have us believe.

The ruins are located west of the town of Clifden in the Connemara region of County Galway, Ireland.

Made with Flickr
5

Clifden Castle - The Clifden Castle was built in 1818 for John D'Arcy the founder of Clifden. The Gothic Revival Style castle was the main living place for the D'Arcy family. The land surrounding the castle was the first drained and reclaimed by John D'Arcy in the Clifden area.

Clifden Castle was built with fantastic features in the early 1800’s including an entry tower with two round turrets, a rounded tower to the southeast, and a square tower. The estate faces south and overlooks Clifden Bay. On the lands of the manor house to the west, there was a large enclosed farmyard, which included the worker’s cottages, stable, grain store, and coachhouse. Next to that was a walled garden, with a pond and a well near there. Also on the Demesne are the remains of a ‘marine temple’ made of sea shells on the stream to the east of the Castle. There is a large gateway on the property, built in 1815 in medieval style. D'Arcy had erected several standing stone on the property, four of which remain along the winding path between the gateway and Clifden Castle today. One stone is believed to be a genuine prehistoric worked stone, brought in from another place, but no one knows for sure. When the Eyre Family bought the estate 1850 some additional features were added including a new thatched roof, and other decorative features which can be seen in the dilapidated manor today. This also added a children’s graveyard to the north, originally for the 3 Eyre children who died in the 1880’s.

More —-> http://www.abandonedplaygrounds.com/the-ruined-gothic-revival-style-manor-clifden-castle-of-ireland/

Clifden Castle was built by John D'Arcy (1785-1839) in a Gothic Revival style in the early 19th century. John was a man of drive, energy and determination. He founded Clifden in 1812 and built his castle around the same time. He was married twice and had fourteen children in all, leaving one to assume that this was a very full and noisy family home.

Following John’s death in 1839, the castle and town passed to his son and heir, Hyacinth. Like so many landlords in the West of Ireland, Hyacinth became bankrupt as a result of debts incurred during the Great Famine and in 1850 the town and castle went on sale.The new owners, the Eyre family from Bath in England, purchased the town and castle for £21,245. The Eyre’s lived at the castle until the 1920s when the lands were eventually purchased by the government and divided out among the tenants. Sadly, the castle had no outright owner and, in time, was stripped bare of its slates and timbers and eventually fell to ruin.

One of the interesting features of this property is the standing stones. D'Arcy had these stones erected to imitate other standing stones around Ireland. It isn’t unknown why he did this, but the stones have been surveyed and it has been determined that they are not as ancient as D'Arcy would have us believe.