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bazluhrmann: The inspiration for the scene between the fish-tank came when Craig and I were so desperately looking for a solution as to how to surprise the audience for the first connective moment between Romeo and Juliet. I was younger then and we might have gone out to clubs a bit more. That night after working all day we squirreled out to a place (if I recall correctly called “The Dome”) in Miami. When I came out of the bathroom to wash my hands I looked up and saw a woman combing her hair with a brush through a fish-tank. It was a brilliant device to get guys and girls to connect through the sitting rooms, while protecting each room’s privacy. Obviously you can see where this moment lead … #romeoandjuliet

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Happy 20th anniversary Romeo + Juliet (1996) 

“Next Tuesday, November 1st is the twentieth anniversary of me second film Romeo + Juliet. It was an extraordinary creative journey, the likes of which I’m sure the cast, crew and close collaborators will never quite experience again. Many doubted the preposterous ambition of setting Shakespeare’s beloved tragic romance in a heighted creative world, with a then relatively unknown Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes, but we did make it, overcoming incredible odds shooting entirely in Mexico. Over the next 7 days, the team and I are going to go through our unpublished archives and as a celebration of time passing, release previously unseen items leading up to R+J’s 20th birthday. Think of it as a big shoutout to Shakespeare himself, whose 400th anniversary is this year.

P.S: If you had anything to do with the making of the film, or are simply, just a fan and want to share, don’t hold back. Though I’m still getting down with ‘The Get Down’, the team and I so much enjoy looking at everything.”

                                                                                                                    - Baz Luhrmann

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Two households, both alike in dignity, in fair Verona, where we lay our scene. From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes, a pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, whose misadventured piteous overthrows doth, with their death, bury their parents’ strife. The fearful passage of their death-marked love and the continuance of their parents’ rage, which, but their children’s end, naught could remove, is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage.

Romeo + Juliet (1996), dir. Baz Luhrmann