Civil-Rights-Attorney

PRESS RELEASE

On Saturday, April 29, 2017 at/or about 11:00 PM an unidentified Balch Springs police officer, allegedly responding to a disturbance call, fired multiple rounds into a motor vehicle occupied by five teenage boys. At least one of the rounds struck 15 year old Jordan Edwards in the head killing him. Jordan had attended a community party with dozens of other youth and was leaving the scene at the time he was fatally shot. It’s been reported that as officers arrived, attendees began to disperse, including Edwards and his companions. They hurried into the car and began to maneuver out of the parking space when they heard someone shout profanity at them. The unidentified person shouting at them was holding a flashlight and appeared to be a police officer. Before the driver could respond the unidentified police officer fired multiple shots at the vehicle. The driver sped away from the gun fire only to discover Edwards had been struck in the head. He stopped the car and flagged down the nearest emergency vehicle. Edwards was transported to Baylor Hospital where he was later pronounced dead.

Jordan Edwards was a straight “A” freshman at Mesquite High School. He was a student athlete who was loved by his family and peers alike. The family is truly devastated by this senseless killing and is calling on a thorough investigation, which should lead to the termination of the officer and criminal charges filed against him for his reckless conduct and disregard for life. Based on witness accounts of the incident, there simply was no justifiable and/or lawful reason for the officer to fire at an occupied vehicle.

As the family struggles to deal with the pointless murder of their child they now have to face false claims of under-age drinking and fabrications about “aggressive" behavior. The Balch Springs PD has offered a familiar narrative in the absence of weapons or any indication of actual danger to the officer and any other person. The claim that the vehicle that Edwards occupied when he was shot “moved in an aggressive way toward an officer” is transparently contrived in order to justify a defenseless act of murder. The facts will bear out the truth and on behalf of the family we demand transparency with all facts and evidence involved. The family is calling on the community to stand with them, resolute in the demand for justice. Civil Rights Attorneys, Lee Merritt, Jasmine Crockett and Daryl Washington, are reviewing the evidence and actively talking to individuals who may have witnessed the incident. They are calling on officials to release the name and identity of the officer involved in the deadly shooting.

– Lee Merrit

02/07/2017: In a very rare rebuke, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) is silenced by Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) for reading the words of Coretta Scott King while speaking out against the civil rights record of Attorney General appointee Jeff Sessions.

Lams Pride Headcannons!
  • ♡ Alexander and John doing inspirational speeches at the rally in NYC.
  • ♡ Alexander giving out cards to offer free legal help to those in the LGBTQIA+ community since he's a civil rights attorney.
  • ♡ John in full drag doing a late night drag show.
  • ♡ They share a kiss outside the Stonewall Inn.
  • ♡ They hold a candlelight vigil for those who lost their lives to hate.
theguardian.com
Revealed: FBI terrorism taskforce investigating Standing Rock activists
FBI representatives have contacted several ‘water protectors’, raising alarm that an indigenous-led movement is being construed as domestic terrorism
By Sam Levin

The FBI is investigating political activists campaigning against the Dakota Access pipeline, diverting agents charged with preventing terrorist attacks to instead focus their attention on indigenous activists and environmentalists.

The Guardian has established that multiple officers within the FBI’s joint terrorism taskforce have attempted to contact at least three people tied to the Standing Rock “water protector” movement in North Dakota.

The purpose of the officers’ inquiries into Standing Rock, and scope of the task force’s work, remains unknown. Agency officials declined to comment. But the fact that the officers have even tried to communicate with activists is alarming to free-speech experts who argue that anti-terrorism agents have no business scrutinizing protesters.

“The idea that the government would attempt to construe this indigenous-led non-violent movement into some kind of domestic terrorism investigation is unfathomable to me,” said Lauren Regan, a civil rights attorney who has provided legal support to demonstrators who were contacted by representatives of the FBI. “It’s outrageous, it’s unwarranted … and it’s unconstitutional.”

Regan, who has regularly visited Standing Rock and is the executive director of the Civil Liberties Defense Center in Oregon, said she learned of three cases in which officers with the taskforce, known as the JTTF, tried to talk to activists in person. She described the encounters as attempted “knocks and talks”, meaning law enforcement showed up at people’s doors without a subpoena or warrant and tried to get them to voluntarily cooperate with an interview.

The three individuals, who include a Native American and a non-indigenous activist, asserted their fifth amendment rights and did not respond to the officers, according to Regan, who declined to identify them to protect their privacy and out of fear of retribution… READ MORE

Stay safe.

anonymous asked:

hey! if you have access to wsj and the article, would you be so kind as to screenshot it and post it for us who might not have access to it? or if you could direct us to a place where we can see it without a subscriber log in! (not sure if i cant see it bc im out of the USA)

I’ll just copy and paste.


“The parents of a former elite gymnast have sued the U.S. Olympic Committee and USA Gymnastics in connection with allegations of years-long sexual abuse by a former team doctor, according to a complaint filed in Los Angeles Superior Court late last month.
The lawsuit, which was filed June 30 but hasn’t been previously reported, marks an escalation of the festering scandal that has shaken the sport and its governing body. It is the first among the scores of civil claims related to the scandal to allege wrongdoing by the U.S. Olympic Committee, and represents the first involvement of civil-rights attorney Gloria Allred.
Allred, known for taking on high-profile sexual-abuse cases, filed the lawsuit along with John Manly, a plaintiffs’ lawyer who is leading much of the litigation related to the scandal.

The lawsuit was filed under pseudonyms for the gymnast’s parents and seeks damages for negligence, intentional infliction of emotional distress and other civil claims. The parents argue that both USA Gymnastics and the U.S. Olympic Committee bear responsibility because the gymnast was under the care of those organizations at the time of the alleged assaults by physician Larry Nassar, and the parents believe those groups conspired to keep the alleged abuse secret in order to protect their reputations.
Patrick Sandusky, a spokesman for the U.S. Olympic Committee, declined to comment on the specific allegations because he said the organization had not been served with the lawsuit. “The allegations surrounding Nassar are astounding and heartbreaking,” he said in a statement. “We were not made aware of them until Nassar had already been reported to law enforcement. We will support any and all efforts to shine a light on the facts and to identify and address any systemic failures that contributed to the abuse that was suffered by these young women.”

A spokeswoman for USA Gymnastics said, “This is the first USA Gymnastics has heard of this lawsuit and declines to comment further.” Allred declined to comment.
While the suit does not reveal the gymnast’s identity, the complaint says she competed nationally and internationally between 2009 and 2013, and that she was regularly “subjected to sexual harassment, abuse and molestation” by Nassar.

Nassar, an osteopathic physician, served as a volunteer trainer and doctor for the U.S. national team for almost 30 years. The state of Michigan charged him in November with first-degree criminal sexual conduct stemming from allegations involving a family friend who was under 13 years old; the state attorney general has since added more than 20 additional counts related to other victims, including gymnasts.

In December, federal prosecutors in Michigan charged Nassar with possession of child pornography. He is expected to plead guilty this week to the federal child-pornography counts, a person familiar with the matter said. The expected guilty plea was reported this weekend by the Detroit News.
The child-pornography charges are unrelated to Nassar’s work with gymnasts but he faces numerous civil lawsuits alleging that he sexually abused gymnasts and other athletes. Nassar has pleaded not guilty to the other pending charges against him and denied wrongdoing.
Nassar’s lawyer declined to comment on his client’s reported guilty plea, and didn’t respond to a request for comment Sunday about the gymnast’s lawsuit.

Attorney Gloria Allred is known for taking on high-profile sexual-abuse cases. PHOTO: MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
According to the June 30 lawsuit, the gymnast’s parents, who live in California, first learned their daughter may have been sexually abused by Nassar in mid-July 2015. USA Gymnastics at that time was conducting a five-week internal investigation into a national team member’s claim that Nassar was molesting her, The Wall Street Journal reported in February.
During that investigation, USA Gymnastics spoke with several national team members, then referred the matter to the Federal Bureau of Investigation at the end of July 2015, the Journal reported.

“I think these parents feel an incredible sense of betrayal,” Manly said of the lawsuit, adding that Nassar was often unsupervised when seeing gymnasts at U.S. Olympic Committee-sponsored events and at the Karolyi Ranch training center in Texas. “Your daughter competes for her country on the national team and this horrific activity happens.”
The parents faced a potential statute-of-limitations deadline, whereas their daughter has a longer time frame in which to file a claim, said Manly, who also represents the gymnast.
USA Gymnastics is already facing three other lawsuits in California brought by former elite gymnasts, including a member of the bronze-medal winning 2000 Olympic women’s team, a former national team member, and a member of the 2010 world team.
All three gymnasts filed as Jane Does, but have since gone public on television and in congressional testimony, identifying themselves as Jamie Dantzscher, Jeanette Antolin and Mattie Larson.
Court documents from those lawsuits show that plaintiffs’ lawyers have sought information from a number of other elite gymnasts, including members of the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympic teams.
In depositions, top USA Gymnastics officials have declined to answer when asked whether the organization has made any confidential settlements with gymnasts, according to the court documents.

USA Gymnastics is challenging the previously filed California litigation on jurisdictional grounds, pointing out that Nassar was a Michigan resident, and that the organization is Indiana-based and incorporated in Texas, court filings show. Manly says USA Gymnastics was a national organization that conducted substantial business in California, including hosting national and international meets there.
The stakes in that fight are high. California is known as a relatively plaintiff-friendly state, where the statute of limitations runs well into victims’ adulthood and courts are often willing to award multimillion-dollar damages.”

Methods of resistance

I’ve talked about how we must fight and resist the coming regime (and let’s be honest: it’s going to be a regime) but I haven’t given any specifics on how to do it.  Here is a numbered list on how you can resist.

  1. Document everything.  Not just online, but offline as well.  Pin those instances of harassment, brutality, propaganda, etc. that you see, but also keep a scrapbook of things that are printed out.  Computers can be hacked; social media can be censored and shut down.  Having multiple records of oppression is important when it comes to proving oppression.
  2. Support organizations dedicated to civil rights and free speech.  Support them with donations, especially recurring ones, and support them by volunteering.  Look at both national organizations and local organizations.  For example, the SPLC or your local chapter of the ACLU, ProPublica or FreePress.net, LGBTQ rights organizations, minority protection groups.
  3. Follow and boost the voices at risk for silencing. Tell others who you’re following.  Follow marginalized people on your social media.  Follow reporters.  Follow artists and creatives.  Retweet, reblog, share to Facebook, boost their voices.  If social media is a vehicle for change then we need to be in the driver’s seat.  Marginalized voices are marginalized because there are so few of them and often the majority does not believe what they say.  In any oppressive regime, the first people to be silenced are the dissenters, the truth-tellers, the creatives.  We have the power now to disseminate information at an incredibly fast rate.  We can’t let that go to waste.
  4. Get creative.  Write, draw, paint, sing, compose, dance.  Express yourself through the arts.  Express your feelings and your views openly and loudly.  The quality of it does not matter.  You must create, and not let anything stifle the impulse.  Art is the medium of resistance.  Throughout history oppressive regimes have silenced writers and composers.  Books have been burned, art has been destroyed, composers have been jailed.  Share art, and also create art.
  5. Take joy anywhere you can find it.  The goal of oppressive regimes is to keep the population depressed and unwilling to do anything.  A gray, bleak existence fuels inactivity.  Be happy whenever you can, celebrate those things in life that are causes for joy.  Anything that makes you smile, little or big, is precious.  Laugh and be carefree - that’s the heart of resistance.
  6. Reach out and stay connected.  Check on your friends and family often. Reach out to the communities in your neighborhood who are at risk.  Black people, Muslims, south Asians, Latinxs, and LGBTQ are all under the crosshairs now.  All PoCs, LGBTQ, and the disabled will be in danger, especially those people whose identities intersect.  Go check out your local mosque or synagogue.  Visit a temple.  Let people know you stand with them.  Don’t just call, show up.  Involve yourself and take part in their events.  Put your body in front of theirs.  Make it personal.
  7. Make and rehearse a plan of action for when you see harassment.  Don’t just come up with the plan; act it out.  Rehearse it so that when you are witness to harassment, you intervene quickly.  What will you say?  What actions do you take?  How do you document, and when do you begin filming or recording (this goes right back to point #1)?  Be secure in your plan.  Even if it’s something as simple as ripping down hatespeech in posters plastered around your town.  Speak out, document, intervene, engage.
  8. Know your rights.  Memorize the parts of the Constitution or Bill of Rights that are most pertinent to what you’ll be doing, and be able to speak the exact language aloud.  Be familiar with the other rights granted to us as citizens of the United States.  Understand what due process is.  Research state and federal law to see what other rights or actions are afforded to you.  Keep on your person or memorize the contact info of an attorney or firm that will defend you in case anything happens (civil rights attorneys, criminal defense attorneys), and create a chain of contacts that will get the word out if things go pear-shaped.
  9. Create a community.  A community works better than any individual.  A community can be large or small, and can put pressure on organizations such as the police when injustice occurs.  A single voice can be ignored, but not the voice of many.

I apologize for the length of the post, and I’m saddened I even feel a need to write this in the year 2016.  But what Trump proposes to do to Muslims is frightening, and even the idea of it should never be entertained.  He’s filling his cabinet with people who will shape policy for the worse.  We must, must resist.

Feel free to reblog and share.

This Christmas, can someone write me a fic? Because, look, 2016 was a shitty year, and for me at least, 2017 is set to start off shitty as well, and man, literally all I want is some stupid Hallmark Channel Christmas movie type fic for E/R.

Like, idk. Enjolras is a big, high-powered civil rights attorney trying to make a difference in the “Big City” but is feeling overwhelmed and overworked and like nothing he is doing is accomplishing anything, so his boss (M. Valjean?) makes him take Christmas off and tells Enjolras to go visit his daughter and her fiance in some snow-covered little town.

And there, of course, the first person he meets is the town curmudgeon, some ridiculously cute guy named Grantaire who jokes that he’s the town Grinch (but of course he ISN’T because in addition to taking the time to show Enjolras around town, he also helps look after his friend Eponine’s little brother Gavroche when she’s out of town and plays Santa in the town Christmas parade because OF COURSE he does). And Enjolras meets all of Grantaire’s friends, including Combeferre and Courfeyrac who have started a local non-profit that’s struggling to stay afloat. And Enjolras naturally swoops in and is like, I can write a grant application for you, no problem.

And then later, he and Grantaire go for a walk and Grantaire’s sad childhood is revealed and he’s all, That’s why I hate Christmas, and Enjolras is all, but you don’t hate Christmas because you like making people happy, and then it starts to snow so Grantaire leans in and kisses him.

And Enjolras, naturally, panics, because he can start to see a future here and it’s not the future he had pictured and he still has SO MUCH work left to do so he tells Grantaire that he can’t stay, that he’s leaving and he’s sorry but he thinks coming here was a big mistake. And Grantaire is hurt and confused but resigned because of course Enjolras is going to leave him, everyone always leaves him, and oh, Merry fucking Christmas.

And the next morning, Enjolras heads to the airport but is stopped before going through security by Gavroche, who hitchhiked to the airport just to tell Enjolras was a big jerk he’s being. Tells him that Combeferre and Courfeyrac’s non-profit is what gave him his first Christmas and that there are so many kids who also need Christmases, and that Enjolras can do a lot of good if he just stays. And Enjolras tells him that it’s more complicated than that, and he wouldn’t understand and it’s adult stuff, but then Gavroche is like, fine, then give me one good reason to leave. And Enjolras can’t.

So he takes Gavroche back to Grantaire, who’s beginning to get worried sick and Grantaire is so happy to see Gavroche but tells Enjolras that he’s sorry he missed his plane but if he hurries back to the airport, he can probably make another flight. And Enjolras tells him he doesn’t want to go back to the airport, that Gavroche asked him for a good reason to leave and he couldn’t think of any, but he could think of a million to stay. Like what? Grantaire asks, and Enjolras just leans in and kisses him.

It starts to snow again, but Enjolras and Grantaire don’t care, standing in the driveway, kissing in the snow. Suddenly, Combeferre and Courfeyrac run up, ecstatic and out of breath. They got the grant! (Because in magic happy land, non-profit grant review boards are open during the holidays ¯\_(ツ)_/¯) And Enjolras looks at Grantaire and laughs is and is just like, It’s a Christmas miracle!

And Valjean allows Enjolras to work remotely and he and Grantaire live happily after in magic land that could never exist outside of a Hallmark Channel movie.


…So yeah, if anyone wants to write me that for Christmas…I’d be grateful.

Hi, new followers!

Hi new (and old) followers! I noticed that I’ve gotten a lot of new followers in the past couple of weeks, so I wanted to take a second to say Hey and let you get to know me.

First, my name is Nicole. Hello! I’m a 20 year old college student in the U.S. studying sociology and going to law school next Fall. I have big dreams to be a criminal defense and civil rights attorney! If you saw me in person, you would probably never guess that I was a witchy-type. While I might fit the “aesthetic” every now and then, I’m almost always in comfy clothes or business casual (for work). I’m a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity, and entering my senior year at my university. Aside from witching-it-up, I also recently got into yoga! In true witchy fashion, I love baking and cooking, painting, and almost any creative outlet!

  • My obsessions: Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, mock trial/law, Big Brother, and siracha (yeah, the sauce. ~One of these things doesn’t belong). If you ever send me an ask or message about these things, I WILL message you back with a wall of text.
  • My favorites: color=black, food=tacos, band=Paramore, place=Lake Tahoe, book=Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Netflix Original Series=Bojack Horseman, beverage=fruit infused water,
  • How I take my coffee: Sugar-free syrup (vanilla, caramel, or hazelnut), cream
  • How I take my tea: No cream, no sugar. Maybe a slice of lemon or some honey.
  • Fun fact: Most people outside of Tumblr call me by my last name.

I’m excited to get to know all of my new followers! Please feel free to send me an ask anytime <3

Read the full transcript of the remarks Jesse Williams delivered at the BET Awards here:

“Before we get into it, I just want to say I brought my parents out tonight. I just want to thank them for being here, for teaching me to focus on comprehension over career, [and] that I make sure I learn what the schools were afraid to teach us, and also thank my amazing wife for changing my life.

Now, this award, this is not for me. This is for the real organizers all over the country, the activists, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents and families and teachers and students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do. All right?

It’s kind of basic mathematics that the more we learn about who we are and how we got here, the more we will mobilize. Now this is also in particular for the black women who have spent their lifetimes dedicated to nurturing everyone before themselves. We can and will do better for you.

Now, what we’ve been doing is looking at the data and we know that police somehow manage to deescalate, disarm, and not kill white people every day. So what is going to happen is we’re going to have equal rights and justice in our own country or we will restructure their function and ours.

Yesterday would have been young Tamir Rice’s fourteenth birthday. So I don’t want to hear any more about how far we’ve come when paid public servants can pull a drive-by on a twelve-year old playing alone in a park in broad daylight, killing him on television and then going home to make a sandwich. Tell Rekia Boyd how it’s so much better to live in 2012 than it is to live in 1612 or 1712. Tell that to Eric Garner. Tell that to Sandra Bland. Tell that to Dorian Hunt.

Now the thing is though, all of us in here getting money, that alone isn’t going to stop this. All right? Dedicating our lives to getting money just to give it right back for someone’s brand on our bodies – when we’ve spent centuries praying with brands on our bodies – and now we pray to get paid for brands on our bodies??? There has been no war that we have not fought and died on the front lines of. There has been no job we haven’t done. There’s no tax they haven’t levied against us. And we’ve paid all of them.

But freedom is somehow always conditional here. “You’re free,” they keep telling us…

But she would have been alive if she hadn’t acted so…free.

Now, freedom is always coming in the hereafter. But, you know what though? The hereafter is a hustle. We want it now. And let’s get a couple of things straight, just a little side note: the burden of the brutalized is not to comfort the bystander. That’s not our job, all right? Stop with all that. If you have a critique for the resistance, for our resistance, then you’d better have an established record of critique of our oppression. If you have no interest in equal rights for black people then do not make suggestions to those who do. Sit down!

We’ve been floatin’ this country on credit for centuries yo! And we’re done watching and waiting while this invention called whiteness uses and abuses us, burying black people out of sight and out of mind while extracting our culture, our dollars, our entertainment like oil, black gold, ghettoizing and demeaning our creations and stealing them, gentrifying our genius, and then trying us on like costumes, before discarding our bodies like rinds of strange fruit.

The thing is though, the thing is: just because we’re magic don’t mean we’re not real.

Thank you.”

Before we get into it I just want to thank my parents over here for teaching me comprehension over career. They taught me what the schools were afraid to teach us. And my amazing wife for changing my life.
Now. This award. This is not for me. This is for the real organizers all over the country: the activists, the civil rights attorneys, the parents, the teachers of students that are realizing that a system built to divide and destroy us cannot stand if we don’t. Alright?
This is kind of basic mathematics. The more we learn about who we are and how we got here the more we are mobilized. This right here is also for the black women in particular who have dedicated their life times to nurturing everyone around them before themselves. We can and will be better for you.
Now. What we’ve been doing is looking at the data, and we know that police officers somehow manage to deescalate, disarm, and not kill white people everyday. So what’s going to happen is we are going to have equal rights and justice in our country or we are going to restructure their function, and ours.
Now. I got another one. Yesterday would have been young Tamir Rice’s 14th birthday. So I don’t want to hear anymore about how far we’ve come when public servants can pull a drive-by on a 12 year old playing alone in a park in the broad daylight. Killing him on television and then going home to make a sandwich.
Tell Rekia Boyd how its so much better to live in 2012 than it is to live in 1612 or 1712. Tell that to Eric Garner. Tell that to Sandra Bland. Tell that to Dorian Hunt.
Now the thing is though. All us in here getting money. That isn’t going to stop this. Alright? Now dedicating our lives to getting money just to give it right back for someone’s brand on our body. When we spent centuries praying with brands on our bodies. And now we pray to get paid with brands on our bodies.
There has been no war that we have not died on the front lines of. There has been no job that we haven’t done. There’s no tax that they haven’t levied against us. And we paid all of them. But freedom is somehow always conditional here. ‘You’re free’ they keep telling us. 'But she would have been alive if she weren’t acting so… Free.’
Now. Freedom is always coming in the hereafter. But you know what? The hereafter is a hustle. We want it now. And let’s get is straight. The burden of the brutalized is not to comfort the bystander. That’s not our job stop with all that. If you have a critique for the resistance, then you better have an established record of critique of our oppressor. If you have no interest in the equal treatment of black people then do not make suggestions to those who do.
Sit down.
We’ve been floating this country on credit for centuries yo. And we’re done watching and waiting while this invention called whiteness uses and abuses us–burying black people out of sight out of mind, while extracting our culture and our dollars and our entertainment like oil.
Like gold.
Ghettoizing and demeaning our creations and stealing them. Gentrifying our genius and trying us on like costumes, before discarding us like rinds of strange fruit. The thing is though. Just because we’re magic doesn’t mean we aren’t real.
—  Jesse Williams, BET 2016 Humanitarian of the Year award speech
tag games

tagged by @slutshame-alexanderhamilton

1. How old are you?

17

2. Current Job?

i was a camp counselor until i broke my leg so for now just Professional Fuck

3. Dream Job? civil rights attorney/nonprofit CEO/freelancer author (yes all 3 at once)

E4. What are you talented at?

writing stories and essays, debate, drawing kinda, having fun, making moodboards, giving advice, making mixtapes for ppl

5. What is a big goal you are working towards or have already achieved?

i’d like to make my school’s FBLA more active as well as get accepted into college and hopefully intern somewhere next summer

6. What is your aesthetic?

@icarai is my aesthetic blog. you tell me

7. Do you collect anything?

semiprecious stones. i used to collect chapsticks when i was like 10

8. What is a topic you’re always up to talk about?

stuff im a fan of (warrior c@ts, gr@vity falls, h@rry potter), history, civil rights/world issues, my pets, almost anything really. i like talking to people bc everyone has a story to tell

9. What’s a pet peeve of yours?

people not minding their fucking business, wearing shoes inside the house, touhcing me w/o permission, insulting my pets, white feminism, performative allyship…..the list goes on and on

10. Good advice to give?

- sit down, shut up, and act like you know something

- enjoy whatever the hell you want as long as its not hurting anyone

- dont talk over those who have a right to speak

- learn to cut people off. not everyone deserves to be your friend but also not everyone wants to and you need to back off and let people live sometimes.

- dont worry about picking a moneymaking career. do what you enjoy and do it well, and money will follow

- no one cares what you look like, everyone is too busy worrying about themselves

- dont involve yourself in drama or debates if you know you cant handle it

11. I tag?

@karminny @thetruthisanexcuse @lauwurens @hameowlton & anyone who wants to do it

8

Civil rights attorney/MSNBC legal analyst Lisa Bloom points out that Darren Wilson’s cross-examination was a joke

anonymous asked:

What can I do with a degree in law?

  • Bankruptcy Lawyer
  • Business / Corporate Law Attorney
    • Collections, contracts, litigation, patents, etc
  • Civil Rights Attorney
    • Constitutional law, discrimination, civil liberties, gay/lesbian rights, voting rights, human rights, etc.
  • Criminal Defense Attorney
    • Expengement, traffic tickets, crime, etc.
  • DUI- DWI Attorney
  • Employment Lawyer - Employees’ Rights
    • Workers’ comp, wrongful termination, harassment, privacy, workplace safety, wage/overtime, discrimination, employee benefit, etc.
  • Environmental Lawyer
  • Estate Law Attorney / Estate Planning
    • Wills, trusts, etc.
  • Family & Divorce Lawyer
    • Adoption, child custody, and divorce
  • Government Lawyers
  • Immigration Lawyer
    • Citizenship, work/school visas
  • Military Lawyer
    • Veteran’s benefits and military law
  • Paralegal
  • Personal Injury Lawyer
  • Private Practice Lawyer
  • Property/Real Estate Law Attorney
    • Foreclosure, landlord-tenant, neighbors, etc
  • Public Interest
    • Pro bono, disability, health/environmental justice
  • Toxic Tort Lawyer
    • Asbestos-Mesothelioma, drug recalls, toxic mold, etc.
  • Trial Lawyer

Check out a full list of areas of law here.

Jesse Williams at the BET Awards -- aka the best speech I’ve ever heard

“Peace peace. Thank you, Debra. Thank you, BET. Thank you Nate Parker, Harry and Debbie Allen for participating in that.

Before we get into it, I just want to say I brought my parents out tonight. I just want to thank them for being here, for teaching me to focus on comprehension over career, and that they make sure I learn what the schools were afraid to teach us. And also thank my amazing wife for changing my life.

Now, this award – this is not for me. This is for the real organizers all over the country – the activists, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents, the families, the teachers, the students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do.

It’s kind of basic mathematics – the more we learn about who we are and how we got here, the more we will mobilize.
Now, this is also in particular for the black women in particular who have spent their lifetimes dedicated to nurturing everyone before themselves. We can and will do better for you.
Now, what we’ve been doing is looking at the data and we know that police somehow manage to deescalate, disarm and not kill white people everyday. So what’s going to happen is we are going to have equal rights and justice in our own country or we will restructure their function and ours.

Now… I got more y’all – yesterday would have been young Tamir Rice’s 14th birthday so I don’t want to hear anymore about how far we’ve come when paid public servants can pull a drive-by on 12 year old playing alone in the park in broad daylight, killing him on television and then going home to make a sandwich. Tell Rekia Boyd how it’s so much better than it is to live in 2012 than it is to live in 1612 or 1712. Tell that toEric Garner. Tell that to Sandra Bland. Tell that to Dorian Hunt.

Now the thing is, though, all of us in here getting money – that alone isn’t gonna stop this. Alright, now dedicating our lives, dedicating our lives to getting money just to give it right back for someone’s brand on our body when we spent centuries praying with brands on our bodies, and now we pray to get paid for brands on our bodies.

There has been no war that we have not fought and died on the front lines of. There has been no job we haven’t done. There is no tax they haven’t leveed against us – and we’ve paid all of them. But freedom is somehow always conditional here. “You’re free,” they keep telling us. But she would have been alive if she hadn’t acted so… free.

Now, freedom is always coming in the hereafter, but you know what, though, the hereafter is a hustle. We want it now.

And let’s get a couple things straight, just a little sidenote – the burden of the brutalized is not to comfort the bystander.That’s not our job, alright – stop with all that. If you have a critique for the resistance, for our resistance, then you better have an established record of critique of our oppression. If you have no interest, if you have no interest in equal rights for black people then do not make suggestions to those who do. Sit down.

We’ve been floating this country on credit for centuries, yo, and we’re done watching and waiting while this invention called whiteness uses and abuses us, burying black people out of sight and out of mind while extracting our culture, our dollars, our entertainment like oil – black gold, ghettoizing and demeaning our creations then stealing them, gentrifying our genius and then trying us on like costumes before discarding our bodies like rinds of strange fruit. The thing is though… the thing is that just because we’re magic doesn’t mean we’re not real.

Thank you.”

William Wayne McMillan Rogers III (April 7, 1933 – December 31, 2015)  Film and television actor, best known for playing the role of Captain “Trapper” John McIntyre in the CBS television series, M*A*S*H.

He was a regular panel member on the Fox News Channel stock investment television program Cashin’ In, as a result of having built a highly successful and lucrative career as an investor, investment strategist and advisor, and money manager.

Rogers appeared on television in various roles in both dramas and sitcoms such as The Invaders, The F.B.I., Gunsmoke, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. and The Fugitive.

In 1959, he played Slim Davis on the soap opera Search for Tomorrow. Rogers also played a role in Odds Against Tomorrow which was nominated for a Golden Globe Award in 1960 as Best Film Promoting International Understanding. He guest starred on an episode of the CBS western, Johnny Ringo.

Rogers co-starred with Robert Bray and Richard Eyer in the western series Stagecoach West, on ABC from 1960 to 1961.

In 1965, Rogers was cast as United States Army Lieutenant Richard Henry Pratt, later of the Carlisle Indian School, in the episode “The Journey” of the syndicated western series, Death Valley Days. Robert J. Wilke plays Sergeant Wilks, who advocates a more harsh treatment of Indian prisoners than does Pratt. Leonard Nimoy plays Yellow Bear.

Later he appeared as an FBI agent in the critically acclaimed 1975 NBC-TV movie Attack on Terror: The FBI vs. the Ku Klux Klan, and as civil rights attorney Morris Dees in 1996’s Ghosts of Mississippi. He also starred in the short-lived but critically lauded 1976 period detective series City of Angels and the 1979–1982 CBS series House Calls, first with Lynn Redgrave, and then later with actress Sharon Gless, who went on to co-star in the CBS-TV crime drama series Cagney and Lacey with actress Tyne Daly (coincidentally, one of the House Calls co-stars was Roger Bowen who played the original Colonel Henry Blake in the MASH movie). Rogers also appeared in the 1980s miniseries Chiefs.  (Wikipedia)