Civic-organization

Baltimore imposes 24 hour curfew on minors.

Additional Curfew for Minors:
In addition to the restrictions imposed above, during Other Hours, minors may not be in a public place except:
- when accompanied by the minor’s parent,
- when strictly necessary to travel to and from school when required to be at school,
- when going to or return from an official school, religious, or other recreational activity supervised by adults and sponsored by the City of Baltimore, a civic organization, or another similar entity that takes responsibility for the minor.

(source) (more here)

A woman holds up a poster with an image of slain environmental rights activist Berta Caceres.

Another Member of Berta Cáceres’ Group Assassinated in Honduras

When will it stop?

Nelson Garcia, another member of Indigenous rights group as murdered Indigenous activist Berta Cáceres, has been assassinated in Honduras, local media reported Tuesday.

Less than two weeks after Caceres was gunned down in her home by unknown assailants, Garcia was killed after being shot four times in the face in the Rio Chiquito community.

Both were outspoken members of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous organizations of Honduras (COPINH).

Local reports suggest that the assassination happened during an evacuation of occupied land executed by Honduran military police.

Around 150 poor families who were members of COPINH had occupied the land at Rio Chiquito for the last two years.

Garcia, the father of five children, was the leader of the community sitting in Rio Chiquito.

Human rights groups in Honduras have demanded the protection of COPINH members since the assassination of Caceres March 3, triggering an outrage across the world.

Human and environment rights activists say that they are targeted in violent attacks in Honduras.

The assassination of Berta Caceres has put international scrutiny on the Honduran government and supporters of multinational projects in the Central American country.

On Monday, activists called on USAID to cut support for the Agua Zarca dam project, which was vehemently opposed by Berta Caceres and her community.

Two activists scaled an art installation in front of the office of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) information office in Washington D.C. as part of protest calling on the U.S. government agency to cut support with a controversial dam project in Honduras.

USAID is supporting the Agua Zarca dam on the Gualcarque River, which was one of the projects opposed by the Lenca people and famed Honduran Indigenous rights defender Berta Caceres, who was recently assassinated, allegedly as a result of her activism.

Ten Ways To Pay For College Right Now

Sometimes, the hardest part is simply knowing where to begin. Here are some tips:

1) Fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, even if you don’t think you’ll qualify.

2) Apply for national grants. Options include Pell Grants, Academic Competitiveness Grants and National SMART Grants.

3) Apply for local scholarships. Civic organizations and religious institutions often have meaningful amounts of aid to dole out.

4) Getting into more than one school translates to a higher likelihood of receiving a big financial aid package.

5) Bargain! Even schools that only provide need-based aid sometimes come up with drastically different offers.

6)  AmeriCorps, Peace Corp, National Health Services Corps and ROTC programs offer college money in exchange for a service commitment.

7) Look abroad. At Scotland’s St. Andrews, U.S. students pay only $21,650.

8) Stay home. Starting out at a low-cost community college and transferring to a four-year college for the final two years will wipe away a hefty chunk of room and board costs, as well as some tuition.

9)  The American Opportunity Tax Credit and the Lifetime Learning Credit are two excellent options.

10)  Don’t forget to consult your local expert – guidance counselors are often aware of options you may not have considered; best of all, their help is free.

Read more.

“In America the Black community in which we live is not owned by us. The landlord is white. The merchant is white. In fact, the entire economy of the Black community in the States is controlled by someone who doesn‘t even live there. The property that we live in is owned by someone else. The store that we trade with is operated by someone else. And these are the people who suck the economic blood of our community. And being in a position to suck the economic blood of our community, they control the radio programs that cater to us, they control the newspapers, the advertising, that cater to us. They control our minds. They end up controlling our civic organizations. They end up controlling us economically, politically, socially, mentally, and every other kind of way. 

They suck our blood like vultures. And when you see the Blacks react, since the people who do this aren’t there, they react against their property. The property is the only thing that’s there. And they destroy it. And you get the impression over here that because they are destroying the property where they live, that they are destroying their own property. No. They can’t get to the man, so they get at what he owns.

This doesn’t say it’s intelligent. But whoever heard of a sociological explosion that was done intelligently and politely? And this is what you’re trying to make the Black man do. You’re trying to drive him into a ghetto and make him the victim of every kind of unjust condition imaginable. Then when he explodes, you want him to explode politely! You want him to explode according to somebody’s ground rules. Why, you’re dealing with the wrong man, and you’re dealing with him at the wrong time in the wrong way.”


http://malcolmxfiles.blogspot.com

Kumu Hina Launches Kickstarter Campaign

Help spread the true meaning of aloha – love, honor and respect for all - through community outreach and education.

At a time when gender-nonconforming people the world over are bullied, harassed, beaten and killed just for being who they are, KUMU HINA presents the remarkable story of a transgender native Hawaiian teacher who uses traditional culture to empower her students and create “a place in the middle” where all people are valued and respected. We want to share this inspiring story with the world as a model for building more gender diverse and inclusive communities, schools and churches. Weʻre asking for your help to take Hina and the documentary on a year-long series of special screening events and community gatherings, and to create an educational version of the film that will be distributed to elementary, middle and high schools and colleges, and community, civic and religious organizations across the U.S and around the globe.

Please check-out and support Kumu Hina’s Campaign for Gender Diversity on Kickstarter HERE.

globalresearch.ca
US Now Admits it is Funding "Occupy Central" in Hong Kong

Just as the US admitted shortly after the so-called “Arab Spring” began spreading chaos across the Middle East that it had fully funded, trained, and equipped both mob leaders and heavily armed terrorists years in advance, it is now admitted that the US State Department through a myriad of organizations and NGOs is behind the so-called “Occupy Central” protests in Hong Kong. The Washington Post would report in an article titled, “Hong Kong erupts even as China tightens screws on civil society,” that: Chinese leaders unnerved by protests elsewhere this year have been steadily tightening controls over civic organizations on the mainland suspected of carrying out the work of foreign powers. The campaign aims to insulate China from subversive Western ideas such as democracy and freedom of expression, and from the influence, specifically, of U.S. groups that may be trying to promote those values here, experts say. That campaign is long-standing, but it has been prosecuted with renewed vigor under President Xi Jinping, especially after the overthrow of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych following months of street demonstrations in Kiev that were viewed here as explicitly backed by the West. The Washington Post would also report (emphasis added): One foreign policy expert, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive subject, said Putin had called Xi to share his concern about the West’s role in Ukraine. Those concerns appear to have filtered down into conversations held over cups of tea in China, according to civil society group members. “They are very concerned about Color Revolutions, they are very concerned about what is going on in Ukraine,” said the international NGO manager, whose organization is partly financed by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED), blamed here for supporting the protests in Kiev’s central Maidan square. “They say, ‘Your money is coming from the same people. Clearly you want to overthrow China.’ ” Congressionally funded with the explicit goal of promoting democracy abroad, NED has long been viewed with suspicion or hostility by the authorities here. But the net of suspicion has widened to encompass such U.S. groups as the Ford Foundation, the International Republican Institute, the Carter Center and the Asia Foundation. Of course, NED and its many subsidiaries including the International Republican Institute and the National Democratic Institute do no such thing as “promoting democracy,” and instead are in the business of constructing a global network of neo-imperial administration termed “civil society” that interlocks with the West’s many so-called “international institutions” which in turn are completely controlled by interests in Washington, upon Wall Street, and in the cities of London and Brussels.

Berta Cáceres with her four children in a photo taken about 15 years ago.

‘Time was running out’: Honduran activist’s last days marked by threats

In her final days, Berta Cáceres was bombarded with texts and calls warning her to give up the fight against the Agua Zarca dam, or else.

The Honduran Indigenous leader told trusted friends and colleagues that some of the death threats were from a suspected sicario – or hitman – who was terrorizing community members near the dam and openly boasting of his intention to kill her.

Cáceres started making arrangements to move from her isolated bungalow on the outskirts of the city of La Esperanza to a bustling lodging house run by her organisation, the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH), where she wouldn’t be alone.

Garifuna Indigenous people and members of the local community protest near the presidential house in Tegucigalpa during the Indigenous forum ‘Berta Cáceres Lives’.

The day before she was murdered, Cáceres took her youngest daughter to the airport. As they hugged goodbye, she whispered a final piece of advice. “She told me: ‘If something happens to me, don’t be scared,’” Laura Cáceres, 23, told the Guardian.

Around lunchtime the following day, Cáceres stopped to sign some cheques at COPINH’s women’s centre, where she told Lilian Esperanza, a longtime friend and the group’s financial coordinator, to plan for her not being around. “She wanted to change the rules so someone else could sign checks. She was worried about being murdered or imprisoned,” said Esperanza. “‘I keep reporting the threats, but no one pays attention,’ she told me.”

Less than 12 hours later, Cáceres was shot dead in her home. Her friend Gustavo Castro, coordinator of Friends of the Earth Mexico, was injured in the attack but survived by playing dead.

Despite the evidence that she had been targeted because of her campaign against the dam, police treated three of her closest colleagues – Castro and two members of COPINH – as the prime suspects.

“My daughter was systematically persecuted for years, but still, I didn’t believe they would actually kill her,” said Berta Flores, 83, sitting next to the candlelit altar adorned with fresh flowers and photographs.

“She worked frantically in the days before she was killed. It’s as if she knew time was running out.”

Cáceres was buried on 4 March on what would have been her 45th birthday.

Keep reading

Hong Kong is in a situation of mass spontaneity. However, it is unlikely that this spontaneity will take the people of Hong Kong very far beyond the demands and consciousness of liberal bourgeois democracy. Right wing sentiment is strong within the protest movement, with many protesters seeking to defend what they see as their national homeland against the incursions of the mainland Chinese. This includes the right wing organization Civic Passion (熱血公民), which has been highly visible in the protests. Meanwhile, the left in Hong Kong is very small, weak and disorganized. While there are various left groups and anarchist collectives in the front lines of the protests, no segment of the anti-capitalist left is able to put into action a strong strategy for pushing the struggle beyond basic electoral demands (though not because of a lack of good effort). Protesters who prepare a defense against police attacks by building barricades out of rubbish bins are attacked by their fellow protesters for being the violent ones, destroying property and provoking the police. Like any liberal, these protesters are often quicker to denounce the simple self-defense of their comrades than they are to denounce the outrageously violent attacks of the police.
— 

Police attack protests in Hong Kong (libcom)

a depressingly familiar story 

thenation.com
In S. Korea, a Dictator’s Daughter Cracks Down on Labor
The Park Geun-hye Regime has banned a massive rally scheduled for this weekend, but activists are vowing to defy the order. .

By Tim Shorrock

Following in the footsteps of her dictator father, South Korea’s President, Park Geun-hye, is cracking down on labor and citizens groups opposed to the increasingly authoritarian policies of her ruling “New Frontier” party known as Saenuri.

The situation could reach a critical point this weekend, when tens of thousands of workers organized by the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions (KCTU) join forces with farmers, students, and other civic organizations in a national action in Seoul to protest Park’s conservative labor, education, and trade policies.

On Saturday, the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency banned the march, with Park’s Justice Minister Kim Hyun-Woong vowing to “uproot illegal and violent demonstration…no matter how much sacrifice is required.” Meanwhile, the president herself equated the protesters—some of whom wear masks as protection from riot police—to terrorists.

“Given that the extremists of the Islamic State group hide their faces, we should ban demonstrators from wearing masks in the future,” Park said, before flying off to Paris for this week’s Climate Change Conference. She last visited Washington in October, when President Obama, her country’s strongest ally, promised that the United States “will never waver” in its commitment to South Korea.

But inside Korea, her actions have brought back memories of her father, General Park Chung Hee, who seized power in 1961 and ruled with an iron hand until he was assassinated in 1979 by the director of the country’s equivalent of the CIA. 

In 1979, Park’s government was in the midst of a savage repression of workers and students who were trying to organize for improved conditions and livable wages during a time of rapid, export-led economic growth. After his death, conditions worsened when another general, Chun Doo Hwan, took over in a bloody coup that culminated in the Kwangju citizens’ uprising, which was put down with assistance from the United States. Chun continued Park’s draconian treatment of unions and dissidents for nearly a decade.

A democratic system was finally established in 1987 after millions of Koreans filled Seoul’s streets for weeks, demanding an end to military rule and for direct elections of their president. It was out of that tumult, and a series of famous industrial strikes, that the KCTU was born. It is now the country’s second-largest union group and by far the most militant.

For the past six months, it has been organizing resistance to a raft of labor reforms pushed by President Park that will make it easier for the country’s family-run conglomerates (called chaebol) to fire workers and provide “flexibility” to Korean and foreign corporations. The law’s primary aim is to increase the huge number of part-time “irregular” workers in Korean industry (20 percent of the workforce, one of the highest rates in the industrialized world) and allow public and private employers to make unilateral changes in working conditions without consulting unions.

[…]

History’s Ten Greatest Polymaths

10. Benjamin Franklin

One of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Franklin was a renowned polymath and a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, freemason, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove. He facilitated many civic organizations, including Philadelphia’s fire department and The University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League institution.

9. Immanuel Kant

German philosopher who is regarded as one of the most important thinkers of modern Europe, and his influence on Western thought is immeasurable. He was the starting point and inspiration for the German Idealism movement in the late 18th and early 19th Centuries, and more specifically for the Kantianism which grew up around him in his own lifetime. His works, especially those on Epistemology, Metaphysics and Ethics, such as his masterworks the "Critique of Pure Reason" and the "Critique of Practical Reason,“ achieved a complete paradigm shift and moved philosophy beyond the debate between the Rationalists and Empiricists which had dominated the Age of Reason and the early Age of Enlightenment.

8. Baruch Spinoza

Dutch Philosopher who laid the groundwork for the 18th-century Enlightenment and modern biblical criticism, including modern conceptions of the self and the universe. He developed highly controversial ideas regarding the authenticity of the Hebrew Bible and the nature of the Divine. His notable ideas were Pantheism, determinism, neutral monism, parallelism, intellectual and religious freedom, and the separation of church and state. He came to be considered one of the great rationalists of 17th-century philosophy. Spinoza's magnum opus, the posthumous "Ethics,“ in which he opposed Descartes' mind–body dualism, has earned him recognition as one of Western philosophy’s most important thinkers.

7. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

German writer and statesman. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him exist.

6. René Descartes

French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist. Dubbed the father of modern western philosophy, much of subsequent Western philosophy is a response to his writings, which are studied closely to this day. Descartes's Meditations on First Philosophy continues to be a standard text at most university philosophy departments. Descartes’s influence in mathematics is equally apparent; the Cartesian coordinate system—allowing reference to a point in space as a set of numbers, and allowing algebraic equations to be expressed as geometric shapes in a two- or three-dimensional coordinate system (and conversely, shapes to be described as equations)—was named after him. He is credited as the father of analytical geometry, the bridge between algebra and geometry, used in the discovery of infinitesimal calculus and analysis. Descartes was also one of the key figures in the scientific revolution. In his theology, he insists on the absolute freedom of God’s act of creation. Descartes laid the foundation for 17th-century continental rationalism, later advocated by Baruch Spinoza and Gottfried Leibniz.

5. Archimedes

Ancient Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer. Although few details of his life are known, he is regarded as one of the leading scientists in classical antiquity. Generally considered the greatest mathematician of antiquity and one of the greatest of all time, Archimedes anticipated modern calculus and analysis by applying concepts of infinitesimals and the method of exhaustion to derive and rigorously prove a range of geometrical theorems, including the area of a circle, the surface area and volume of a sphere, and the area under a parabola. Other mathematical achievements include deriving an accurate approximation of pi, defining and investigating the spiral bearing his name, and creating a system using exponentiation for expressing very large numbers. He was also one of the first to apply mathematics to physical phenomena, founding hydrostatics and statics, including an explanation of the principle of the lever. He is credited with designing innovative machines, such as his screw pump, compound pulleys, and defensive war machines to protect his native Syracuse from invasion.

4. Aristotle

Greek philosopher and scientist. At seventeen or eighteen years of age, he joined Plato’s Academy in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c. 347 BC). His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theater, music, rhetoric, linguistics, politics and government – and constitute the first comprehensive system of Western philosophy. Shortly after Plato died, Aristotle left Athens and, at the request of Philip of Macedon, tutored Alexander the Great beginning in 343 BC. The fact that Aristotle was a pupil of Plato contributed to his former views of Platonism, but, following Plato’s death, Aristotle immersed himself in empirical studies and shifted from Platonism to empiricism. He believed all peoples’ concepts and all of their knowledge was ultimately based on perception. Aristotle’s views on physical science profoundly shaped medieval scholarship. Their influence extended from Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages into the Renaissance, and were not replaced systematically until the Enlightenment and theories such as classical mechanics. Some of Aristotle’s zoological observations, such as on the hectocotyl (reproductive) arm of the octopus, were not confirmed or refuted until the 19th century. His works contain the earliest known formal study of logic, which was incorporated in the late 19th century into modern formal logic. In metaphysics, Aristotelianism profoundly influenced Judeo-Islamic philosophical and theological thought during the Middle Ages and continues to influence Christian theology, especially the Neoplatonism of the Early Church and the scholastic tradition of the Roman Catholic Church. Aristotle was well known among medieval Muslim intellectuals and revered as “The First Teacher.” His ethics, though always influential, gained renewed interest with the modern advent of virtue ethics. All aspects of Aristotle’s philosophy continue to be the object of active academic study today.

3. Leonardo Da Vinci

Italian polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography. He has been variously called the father of palaeontology, iconology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time. Sometimes credited with the inventions of the parachute, helicopter and tank, he epitomised the Renaissance humanist ideal. Today, Leonardo is widely considered one of the most diversely talented individuals ever to have lived.

2. Isaac Newton

English physicist and mathematician (described in his own day as a “natural philosopher”) who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time and a key figure in the scientific revolution. His book “Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy,” first published in 1687, laid the foundations for classical mechanics. Newton made seminal contributions to optics, and he shares credit with Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz for the development of calculus. Newton's Principia formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation, which dominated scientists’ view of the physical universe for the next three centuries. Newton’s work removed the last doubts about the validity of the heliocentric model of the Solar System. Newton built the first practical reflecting telescope and developed a theory of colour based on the observation that a prism decomposes white light into the many colours of the visible spectrum. He formulated an empirical law of cooling, studied the speed of sound, and introduced the notion of a Newtonian fluid. In addition to his work on calculus, as a mathematician Newton contributed to the study of power series, generalised the binomial theorem to non-integer exponents, developed a method for approximating the roots of a function, and classified most of the cubic plane curves. Beyond his work on the mathematical sciences, Newton dedicated much of his time to the study of biblical chronology and alchemy, but most of his work in those areas remained unpublished until long after his death.

1. Nikola Tesla

Serbian-American inventor, discoverer, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, theoretical and experimental physicist, mathematician, futurist and humanitarian. Tesla was a hyperpolyglot who could speak eight languages fluently including: Serbo-Croatian, English, Czech, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, and Latin. Tesla has more original inventions to his credit than any other man in history. He has been accounted for 278 patents in 26 different countries. He was the true father of radio and a man far ahead of his time. He is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system that we still use today. He was the first to invent and patent a commutatorless alternating current induction motor that led to an AC/DC war with Thomas Edison which Tesla won. Ninety percent of the entire electrical industry pays tribute to his genius. All electrical machinery using or generating alternating current is due to Tesla. High tension current transmission without which our long distance trolley cars, our electrified lines, our subways would be impossible. The Tesla Induction Motor, the Tesla Rotary Converter, the Tesla Phase System of Power Transmission, the Tesla Steam and Gas Turbine, the Tesla Coil, and the Oscillation Transformer are perhaps his better known inventions. In his labs he conducted a range of experiments with mechanical oscillators/generators, electrical discharge tubes, and early X-ray imaging. He is also the father of remote control, building a wireless controlled boat first ever exhibited in 1898. Although not recognized for, he was the first to discovery the electron, radioactivity, cosmic rays, terrestrial resonance, stationary waves (standing waves), and the first to invent florescent light bulbs. He first demonstrated wireless energy/power by lighting his light bulbs wirelessly in a demonstration given before the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia,1893. He also theorized a particle beam to be used for defense in war and also to produce an artificial Aurora Borealis to light the night skies. In his later life he wanted to bring humanity so much more with his inventions and discoveries, but lacked the investments and funds to finish his work on a large scale. He would eventually die penniless and alone in his New York apartment, but like all the greats above, he lives on through all his inventions and contributions to this world that we still rely very much on today.

In America, the black community in which we live is not owned by us. The landlord is white. The merchant is white. In fact, the entire economy of the black community in the states is controlled by someone who doesn’t even live there. The property that we live in is owned by someone else. The store that we trade with is operated by someone else. And these are the people who suck the economic blood of our community. And being in a position to suck the economic blood of our community, they control the radio programs that cater to us, they control the newspapers, the advertising, that cater to us. They control our minds. They end up controlling our civic organizations. They end up controlling us economically, politically, socially, mentally, and every other kind of way. They suck our blood like vultures.
And when you see the Blacks react, since the people who do this aren’t there, they react against their property. The property is the only thing that’s there and they destroy it. And you get the impression over here that because they are destroying the property where they live, that they are destroying their own property. No. They can’t get to the man, so they get at what he owns.

This doesn’t say it’s intelligent. But whoever heard of a sociological explosion that was done intelligently and politely? And this is what you’re trying to make the black man do. You’re trying to drive him into a ghetto and make him the victim of every kind of unjust condition imaginable. Then when he explodes, you want him to explode politely. You want him to explode according to somebody’s ground rules. Why, you’re dealing with the wrong man, and you’re dealing with him at the wrong time in the wrong way.
http://malcolmxfiles.blogspot.com/

Olivia Zuniga Caceres, daughter of murdered Indigenous activist leader Berta Cáceres, calls for justice during a meeting in Tegucigalpa, March 15, 2016.

Children of Murdered Indigenous Activist Berta Cáceres Face Harassment

Cáceres’ children demand that the Honduran government better investigate their mother’s death and provide them with security.

Laura Zuniga Cáceres, the daughter of murdered Honduran environmental rights activist Berta Cáceres, said her family has faced at least four incidents of harassment since their mother was killed on March 3.

Since Cáceres was shot and killed in her own home, her daughter and three sons traveled back to Honduras where they say unknown armed men have been following them and strangers have showed up to photograph their grandmother’s home where the family has been staying.

Zuniga Cáceres denounced these acts in a special conference in Washington Wednesday, where she also requested to meet Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez in person to ask for additional security measures.

“We live within a fence that the government built for us. They don’t say they’re investigating. They have ignored us in a bestial way,” said Zuniga Cáceres, who is herself an activist. She also requested that Washington put pressure on the Honduran government to investigate her mother’s murder.

Meanwhile, Gustavo Castro, the Mexican activist who witnessed Cáceres’ murder, said he is concerned that he is being implicated in the crime.

Both Castro and the Mexican Ambassador Dolores Jimenez expressed their concern in front of the National Human Rights Commission March 16 that Castro may be charged by the government for Cáceres’ murder. The Mexican activist has been forbidden by local authorities from leaving the country.

Castro suspects the government will try to pin the murder of Cáceres on members of the activist group she founded and ran, the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations.

Castro spent several days in custody following Cáceres’ death, but since his release he has been forced to take refuge in the Mexican Embassy in Tegucigalpa, fearing for his life.

6

Want to Help Dolphins In captivity? Read Through This Guidebook To Being a Dolphin Defender

Getting Organized
When launching a campaign it is a good idea to get in touch with animal protection organizations that already work on this issue.

Animal protection organizations are practically everywhere, but not all of them work on the dolphin captivity issue. Unfortunately, some groups simply post information about the dolphin captivity issue on their websites for fund-raising purposes. Do your homework and ask them exactly what they are doing on this issue. Log onto your computer and surf the web, call newspapers, check at city hall and the chamber of commerce for organizations that are already working on the kind of campaign you wish to conduct. If you find one, join them.

In working for dolphins or any other cause, you’ll discover that you need to communicate with some government agencies, as well as people in the media, law enforcement officials and civic organizations. You’ll need to write to these people from time to time, they’ll get to know your name, you’ll make appointments to talk to them at their office and later, perhaps, you’ll get to know them well enough so that you can just drop by if you have a special problem or a question.


Dealing with the Law

The legislation concerning dolphin captivity is different in every country. You will need to research what the law says in the specific country you are dealing with. If you find it’s too complicated to do, contact an animal welfare organization in that country. They will be more than happy to help you find the information you are looking for. In fact, they probably already have the specific legislation on file and can send it to you in a matter of a few days.


Get Involved with the Media

Unless you can get your story out to the public, you will get nowhere in your campaign. You need the media for that. But don’t call it “publicity.” A reporter or journalist of any media is not interested in your publicity. Reporters are interested in news or a good story. The reporter comes to you because he or she needs facts for the story. So you must deal in facts. Don’t guess. Don’t offer your opinion, your suspicion, or your hope as fact. And if you don’t know the answer to a question, just say so. But if you know anything at all that the reporter needs to know, say that. Be helpful, and honest.

Don’t even think about manipulating the press. You don’t want to be manipulated, do you? Well, neither do reporters. And they know immediately when you try to manipulate them. Instead, think in terms of getting the information out to the public.


Getting the Facts

Since our value as an organization is based on the facts we gather, let’s consider how facts are gathered. Read books about dolphins and take notes. When you read newspapers and magazines, clip out items that relate to dolphins. This will help you learn about them. Develop a file system and date entries in your files. In collecting facts, collect complete facts, which includes exactly who did what to whom and when. Everything you learn about the subject can be put in the files and dated.

Gathering facts in the field about captive dolphins is sometimes quite challenging because you can’t be sure that the names dolphins have are correct. Little honky-tank dolphin road shows and even the largest, most prestigious of dolphinariums have been known to substitute one dolphin for another whenever it suited them. Get to know the dolphins individually.


Using Data

So when you’ve gathered the information, what do you do with it?

Sometimes we have so much material that strongly indicates mistreatment of dolphins, we can go directly to the police or prosecuting attorney. In either case you will be expected to cite the law or regulation you claim is being broken and who broke it, when and where.

If your information doesn’t support criminal charges, it may be strong enough for the media. Send a press release to all newspapers and TV stations in the area. They all have reporters interested in legitimate environmental subjects. Generally they’re leery of a story that could backfire into a lawsuit that would cost them money – even if they win it. So you can expect them to be skeptical at first. And if they suspect that your information is not completely accurate, they’ll show you the door.


More Than Facts

We need facts, but the main thrust of our campaign is moral. We’re saying that keeping dolphins in captivity is wrong.

Our objective is to shut down captive dolphin facilities and stop any further captures and exploitation of dolphins. Ultimately, what we want to do is free captive dolphins; return them to the wild if possible. Not all captive dolphins can be successfully released back into the wild, of course. Some dolphins have been in captivity too long and sometimes they’ve forgotten even how to catch a life fish or eat one. Can we tell whether a captive dolphin can make it in the wild or not? Definitely.

We don’t do it by training them to be free dolphins, incidentally. That’s impossible. But we can give them a chance for rehabilitation by weaning them away from everything human beings have taught them and reacquainting them with the skills they depended on as dolphins in nature.

If they succeed, they’re candidates for freedom. We release them, monitor them till we’re sure they’re okay in the wild, and then go on to the next case. For those who are not candidates, we can try to transfer them to protective custody.


Read More: http://dolphinproject.net/a-guidebook-for-dolphin-defenders/

Back in the 1980s, the psychologist Jerome Kagan presciently noticed that something was happening to American parents: Absent having any other conspicuous way to prove moral worth — by taking care of their own parents, say, or heading up local civic organizations — we instead try to show our virtue through parenting. It’s become our new plumage, how we parent, peacockishly displayed on Facebook and in playgrounds and at birthday parties; the result is a culture of surveillance and judgment rather than compassion and collaboration, and frankly, it’s exhausting — nor is it doing anyone one lick of good.

“In America, the black community in which we live is not owned by us. The landlord is white. The merchant is white. In fact, the entire economy of the black community in the states is controlled by someone who doesn’t even live there. The property that we live in is owned by someone else. The store that we trade with is operated by someone else. And these are the people who suck the economic blood of our community. And being in a position to suck the economic blood of our community, they control the radio programs that cater to us, they control the newspapers, the advertising, that cater to us. They control our minds. They end up controlling our civic organizations. They end up controlling us economically, politically, socially, mentally, and every other kind of way. They suck our blood like vultures.

And when you see the Blacks react, since the people who do this aren’t there, they react against their property. The property is the only thing that’s there and they destroy it. And you get the impression over here that because they are destroying the property where they live, that they are destroying their own property. No. They can’t get to the man, so they get at what he owns.

This doesn’t say it’s intelligent. But whoever heard of a sociological explosion that was done intelligently and politely? And this is what you’re trying to make the black man do. You’re trying to drive him into a ghetto and make him the victim of every kind of unjust condition imaginable. Then when he explodes, you want him to explode politely. You want him to explode according to somebody’s ground rules. Why, you’re dealing with the wrong man, and you’re dealing with him at the wrong time in the wrong way.”

~Malcolm X

#BlackLeaders #MalcolmX #BlackNationalist #PanAfrikan

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In America, the black community in which we live is not owned by us. The landlord is white. The merchant is white. In fact, the entire economy of the black community in the States is controlled by someone who doesn’t even live there. The property that we live in is owned by someone else. The store that we trade with is operated by someone else. And these are the people who suck the economic blood of our community. And being in a position to suck the economic blood of our community, they control the radio programs that cater to us, they control the newspapers, the advertising, that cater to us. They control our minds. They end up controlling our civic organizations. They end up controlling us economically, politically, socially, mentally, and every other kind of way. They suck our blood like vultures.

And when you see the Blacks react, since the people who do this aren’t there, they react against their property. The property is the only thing that’s there and they destroy it. And you get the impression over here that because they are destroying the property where they live, that they are destroying their own property. No. They can’t get to the man, so they get at what he owns.

This doesn’t say it’s intelligent. But whoever heard of a sociological explosion that was done intelligently and politely? And this is what you’re trying to make the black man do. You’re trying to drive him into a ghetto and make him the victim of every kind of unjust condition imaginable. Then when he explodes, you want him to explode politely. You want him to explode according to somebody’s ground rules. Why, you’re dealing with the wrong man, and you’re dealing with him at the wrong time in the wrong way.

https://sellfy.com/MalcolmX

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On this day in music history: February 29, 1980 - Buddy Holly’s signature horn rimmed glasses are found in the archives of the Gordo County Sheriffs office in Mason City, IA. Thought to have been lost in the plane crash in February 1959 that claimed Holly’s life, they are discovered in a sealed manila envelope in the Sheriffs office in Mason City, IA. The prescription glasses were originally found on April 7, 1959, two months after the crash buried in a snow drift. Holly originally purchased the glasses from his optometrist Dr. J. Davis Armistead in 1957 for $20, who in turn acquired the Faiosa plastic frames while on vacation in Mexico City. They are returned to Holly’s widow Maria Elena, who keeps them until October 1998. The glasses are purchased from her for $80,000 by the non-profit cultural organization Civic Lubbock in Holly’s hometown of Lubbock, TX, and are on permanent display at the Buddy Holly Center along with numerous other artifacts that were owned by the rock & roll icon.

Yunho named honorary ambassador of National Assembly Library

Hallyu idol star TVXQ’s Yunho was named an honorary ambassador of the National Assembly Library of Korea for “knowledge sharing” on Wednesday.

The library held the appointment ceremony for the singer in its building in Yeouido, giving him a medal and a lifetime license to browse its collections.

Yunho will participate in public communication activities for spreading the “knowledge sharing” project of the National Assembly Library and civic organizations.

“Yunho has been active as Korea’s e-government ambassador and for food for the hungry, being famous for his honest , intelligent image. Hence, his behavior is in accordance with the values we seek through our ‘knowledge sharing project,’” the library said.  

During the war years Spain sought, with considerable success, to divide Cubans along racial lines by portraying itself as the defender of white “civilization” and the rebels as black barbarians pursuing the goal of an Africanized, Haitianized Cuba. Once the rebels had been defeated, Spanish policy changed direction, making an open bid for Afro-Cuban support by gradually repealing the caste laws. Spanish officials did not act spontaneously but, rather, under pressure from a well-organized civil rights movement based in the social clubs, mutual aid societies, and civic organizations of the Afro-Cuban middle class. Under the leadership of journalist and political activist Juan Gaulberto Gomez, in 1887 these organizations formed an islandwide Directorio Central de las Sociedades de la Raza de Color to coordinate the civil rights struggle. Between 1878 and 1893 Afro-Cuban activists obtained government edicts outlawing restrictions on interracial marriage; segregation in public education and public services; and the keeping of official birth, death, and marriage records in volumes separated by race.
— 

Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000

 By George Reid Andrews

from the chapter: The politics of Freedom

I just want to stress that although there wasn’t a mirrored Civil Rights Movement [as it was in the U.S.] in Latin American countries, there has always been Civil Rights MovementS throughout the regions. Afrodescendants have always fought for justice, human rights and right to life, but each country/region had their own historical processes. Very important to be aware of that.