“Oya: Rise of the Orishas”- African Superhero Movie (Trailer)

The film resurrects mythical deities from African (Yoruba) folklore, known as Orishas, into modern-day superheroes in Britain. The film will be presented In a visually unique style drawing inspiration from related genres, including sci-fi, action and martial arts and presenting a truly phenomenal spectacle in the art of film. According to the Yoruba religion of Nigeria Orishas are a collective of charismatic deities with specialised supernatural gifts, powers and responsibilities.  Tradition has it that these supernatural beings once walked the earth with humanity. We will tell a story that has not been heard before and discover worlds that have not yet been explored in Black British Cinema. These rich worlds and stories have been carried in peoples’ minds for millennia and told mostly orally. Amazingly, this culture has not been visualised on the British silver screen, until now.

So excited for this project! For more check out their links below:

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Nollywood touches African lives across the continent

“In Nollywood, you don’t waste time,” he said. “It’s not the technical depth that has made our films so popular. It’s because of the story. We tell African stories.”

The stories told by Nigeria’s booming film industry, known as Nollywood, have emerged as a cultural phenomenon across Africa, the vanguard of the country’s growing influence across the continent in music, comedy, fashion and even religion.

Nollywood generates about 2,500 movies a year, making it the second-biggest producer after Bollywood in India, and its films have displaced U.S., Indian and Chinese ones on the televisions that are ubiquitous in bars, hair salons, airport lounges and homes across Africa.

The industry employs 1 million people — second only to farming — in Nigeria, pumping $600 million annually into the national economy, according to a 2014 report by the U.S. International Trade Commission. In 2002, it made 400 movies and $45 million.

Nollywood resonates across Africa with its stories of a precolonial past and of a present caught between village life and urban modernity. The movies explore the tensions between the individual and extended families, between the draw of urban life and the pull of the village, between Christianity and traditional beliefs. For countless people, in a place long shaped by outsiders, Nollywood is redefining the African experience.

African tastes

“I doubt that a white person, a European or American, can appreciate Nollywood movies the way an African can,” said Katsuva Ngoloma, a linguist at the University of Lubumbashi in the Democratic Republic of Congo who has written about Nollywood’s significance. “But Africans — the rich, the poor, everyone — will see themselves in those movies in one way or another.”

In Yeoville, a neighborhood in Johannesburg that is a melting pot for migrants, a seamstress from Ghana took orders one recent morning for the latest fashions seen in Nollywood movies. Hairstylists from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Mozambique and Zimbabwe, working in salons or on the street, offered hair weaves following the styles favored by Nollywood actresses.

“Nigerian movies express how we live as Africans, what we experience in our everyday lives, things like witchcraft, things like fighting between mother-in-laws and daughter-in-laws,” said Patience Moyo, 34, a Zimbabwean hair-braider. “When you watch the movies, you feel it is really happening. One way or another, it will touch your life somewhere.”


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Nollywood trailer: Okon Lagos

“Okon Lagos” - produced by Uduak Oguamanam and directed by Desmond Elliot, tells the story of Okon, a down-on-his luck hunter from the backwoods of Akwa Ibom, who comes to Lagos in search of glory and wealth. Soon, he finds that his crude ways have no place in the city. Will Okon, like a true hunter, survive in the concrete jungle that Lagos is or be lost in the wilds forever?

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Watch the 12-minute short film (live action) starring Ethosheia Hylton as Oya, Prince Shoyelu, Jayde Stedford, Quincy Okpokpor, Luiana Bonfim and Orwi Imanuel Ameh. 

It’s been almost two years since we first reported on Nigerian writer, director and producer Nosa Igbinedion‘s superhero film Oya: Rise of the Orishas, which reimagines the Orishas (folkloric deities of West African origin with mythical powers) as a band of crusaders fighting against evil forces. Since then, Igbinedion’s short film has scored its creator the Rising Talent Award at the 2015 Screen Nation Awards in London and enjoyed successful screenings at festivals in Nigeria, Brazil, the US and across Europe.

Igbinedion’s production company Igodo Films recently shared Oya: Rise of The Orishas in full online. They also revealed that the Oya project has been adapted for the silver screen with principal photography on the feature-length film version scheduled to begin later this year in Brazil. The London-based filmmaker shared in a recent interview that he made the short film in order to prove that there is a market for sci-fi films revolving around African characters and storylines. In this regard, Oya joins Ethiopian post-apocalyptic flick Crumbs in forging a path for future film projects from the continent within the realm of speculative fiction. In addition to the full-length project, Oya‘s creators have also confirmed plans for a comic book adaptation of the film, which is currently available for pre-order.


Dal 5 all'8 giugno Nollywood conquista Parigi con il Nollywoodweek Paris Film Festival, durante il quale verranno proiettate otto pellicole della seconda più grande industria cinematografica mondiale. 

Nella foto una scena di “Mother Of George”, film di chiusura del Festival, diretto dal regista nigeriano Andrew Dosunmu.


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