Using Poppers: Or how to feel the rush & not end up in the ER.

So this is the first real P.S.A. I’ve ever written - but after a few messages over the past few months, I decided it was time to do a general intro & such on the use of those ever-potent little brown bottles that us Cardiophiles love to play with… POPPERS! 

So for the neophytes, what are these special chemicals that make us go wild? And for that matter, what good are they? Let’s take a brief look back in time for a bit on them.

Poppers - the chemical aromas found in such varities as “RUSH” “Jungle Juice” “Amsterdam” and many others have their origins in history as a derivative of Amyl Nitrite. Amyl Nitrite is a potent vasodialator which has been used in cardiovascular research & treatment of some conditions for decades. The actual process is this: Upon inhalation and contact with the bloodstream, Amyl Nitrite releases through chemical properties a crapload of nitric acid. Nitric acid in turn causes smooth muscle (including the arteries) to open and dilate. As the nitric acid swirls through the bloodstream, it passes through the heart, and opens the coronary arteries, dropping blood pressure around the heart. The heart senses this, and begins to pump not only faster but with more intensity, trying to balance the blood pressure not only around it - but also through the rest of the body. This drop in BP is also what gives the heady rush feeling just prior to your heart pumping in an incredible, intense manner. 

In the USA, as it is in some countries, Amyl Nitrite isn’t available without a prescription. Other chemical compounds have since made themselves widely available - Isobutyl Nitrite, Isopentyl Nitrite & Butyl Nitrite being the three most common. Usually you’ll find these in your local “adult’ store under various brands, often naming the use as “VCR Head Cleaner” “room aroma” among others. Many Leather stores sell wide varieties of these, all with similar chemicals in them to get your blood pumping and your heart pounding. 

So let’s now go into your first time - and what to expect. 

Chances are, if you’re using these bottles of potent vapor, you’re already pretty hard-core cardiophile, complete with stethoscope & most likely your microphone for posterity recordings. So here’s a basic timeline of what will happen on that first inhale:

0:10 - you feel a bit dizzy, and a bit tingly. 
0:15 - your skin tingles a bit more, and begins to ‘flush’ red- often starting in the head, down your neck, and across your chest. 
0:25-0:30 - your heart begins to pump with tremendous force, and your heart rate begins to accelerate.
0:35-0:45 - breathing becomes deeper and much more rapid; full intensity of the nitrites in your body; your heart is not reaching the higest level of impact from the first inhale
1:00-1:30 - the rush dissipates, and the heart begins to restore normal BP; it feels like your heart is pounding in your skull
1:30-3:00 - The heart begins to pump normally, and the rate returns to normal. 

As far as the physical effects, they do vary - but in my own course of research, I’ve noted these happening:

Strong & hard plunge in BP - in one instance, as my heart rate passed 160, my BP dropped to 90/40. 
More pronounced valve sounds - notably at tricuspid & mitral positions - as the heart dilates to pump more blood, the valve sounds become accentuated and the sound is incredible. Systolic murmurs can appear at the Aortic & pulmonic positions. 
Thundering heart- Exactly as it sounds, it feels as if your heart is trying to pump out of your ribs. 

Now mind you, that’s just one hit. Many of us (myself included) go for extended runs - poppering up if you will - to prolong the intensity of the effects on the heart. And you can, with experience & practice, do the same for yourself. But there are a few things that can make or break the experience:

1.) Straight-breathing the vapors will kill the effect after about four minutes - you’ll lose the rush, and the intensity of the pleasure. It is better to pace the hits out on a regular time basis and keep the intensity - and the pumping of your heart - at the maximum level.  In my own work (and my work with other ‘subjects’) I have found that hits every 35-45 seconds works good for a 9-12 minute cycle. 

2.) Your body type, size, etc. do play a role on how they impact your heart - as well as other things. For example: A heavy, burly man like myself requires longer and more deep hits for the right impact on my heart; a thin, younger man’s heart. 

3.) Smoking: The nitrites are VERY flammable - if you use tobacco products, do not mix the two together. You’ll end up in the burn ward.  

4.) Prolonged exposure can cause some temporary effects you don’t necessarily want. If you’re new, don’t do repeat hits until after you’ve experienced what poppers do to your body & your heart. 

Popper no-nos:

I have seen, experimented & tried many methods of working my heart over to get it to beat like I want it - and I’ve learned quite a bit on myself and my ‘subjects’ Here’s a list of warnings & such that you might be wary of:

1.) Your erection may fall flat: As BP drops hard, so will your shaft. It is a natural course to happen, so you may have to edge yourself up a bit. 
2.) Notable irregular beats: I’ve had this happen to me on numerous occasions - and on a few subjects. During an intense popper session, I began to have dropped beats - that wonderful ‘pause’ that lasts a little too long followed by a powerful contraction of the ventricles.  More commonly though, they begin to appear at the end of a poppers session - and can be not only a lot more frequent, but last for several minutes. (My ‘record’ was 2:30 of irregular beats.)
3.) Poppers & stimulants: You might think this will heighten the effects on your heart… but it doesn’t. While both make your heart race & your blood surge, both act differently on the heart. Stimulants force the heart to pump faster & harder by raising blood pressure, poppers do the same by lowering blood pressure. Poppers & stimulants end up counteracting each other, and really ruin the ‘rush’ of poppers - and of stimulants. Best recommendation: Do one, or the other, but not both. 
3.) Poppers & Viagra/Cialis/Levitra/Quickerdickeruppers (Both prescription & OTC). DON’T EVER DO THIS. I mean that. I have experimented on a gentleman who took a Cialis, and wanted a poppering session without telling me of his Cialis. Three minutes in, his heart rate passed 190, and his BP dropped to unmeasurable levels - followed by his passing out. And then a trip to the ER and some very awkward questions followed. Cialis, etc. are potent vasodilators in their own right, and do similar effects on the heart as do poppers. Combining the two could lead to a death certificate as the heart becomes hypoxic - with no oxygen reaching the heart muscle, ventricular fibrilation & cardiac arrest could follow.  Remember: Don’t mix the two - ever. 
4.) Other illegal drugs: I’m not advocating these drugs at all - as mild or as wild as they may be. I can say this: Poppers interact with everything- and will screw your heart up good when combined with illegal drugs. 


So there you have it, my fellow cardiophiles. If you choose to go the poppers route, welcome - play safe & play careful. Know your body, know your heart, and have fun. 

This week, David J Roth compares the Lakers to LA, fights on Bravo reality shows, the US Senate, Ocean’s 11 crossed with a Lars von Trier film, and the way we live now. He also points out that Kobe possesses the eyes of a psychotic teddy bear and Steve Nash would rather be listening to Wolf Parade. All that, plus jokes about Cialis packs and Anthony Keidis wearing a dumb hat!

Unknown Facts about Cialis

Discovery of Cialis

Cialis, the most well known brand name of the drug Tadalafil was developed in an unusual way. Tadalafil was first known as compound “IC351” an experimental heart condition treatment. During the trial and testing phases of compound IC351, men in the heart condition study began to report erections as a side effect of the drug. This eventually led towards a study for use of Tadalafil as an erectile dysfunction medication. Soon after a patent was issued to compound IC351 and it was renamed as the generic Tadalafil and the Brand Cialis once the new drug application was approved by the FDA.
Aside from the usage of Cialis as an erectile dysfunction treatment option, it has been approved for two fairly beneficial usage options:

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH)

This is a condition in which the blood pressure is high within the blood vessels such as arteries, arterioles, veins and capillaries located in the lungs. This condition impedes the ability of the lungs to function correctly when receiving oxygen with the increased blood pressure.
The symptoms of PAH will usually be shortness of breath (even while resting), dizziness, tiredness, non-productive cough, swelling of the ankles, fainting and blood expectorated through coughing. The condition can actually cause exercise to be an exceedingly difficult task.
Cialis, when given at a 40 mg dose (two of the 20 mg pills) once daily can reduce symptoms of PAH and improve the ability to exercise by lowering blood pressure throughout the body, relieving some of the strain from the pulmonary blood vessels.

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

This is a condition which affects males, causing the prostate gland to enlarge (not caused by cancer or tumor growth). This enlargement causes extraneous pressure on the urethra which could obstruct the flow of urine (as well as seminal fluid).
The symptoms of BPH can include and are not limited to sudden urination urgency, hesitation in urine flow, weak urine stream/pressure and more frequent feelings of urination during resting hours. The blockage can also block semen flow or cause a retrograde ejaculation (semen travels backwards into bladder).
The usage of Cialis for BPH is prescribed in daily 5mg tablet dosage for treatment of symptoms only. The 5mg daily tablet may also be used for erectile dysfunction.