Chinese-Premier

The [2009 Copenhagen climate change] summit had developed into another grudge match between the developed and developing worlds. China, India, and Brazil were refusing to sign an agreement that would commit them to even incremental steps to curb emissions. Diplomats from 193 countries wandered the bright hallways of the Bella Center in a state of fretful energy.

With failure looming, [Secretary of State Hillary] Clinton telephoned [President] Obama and urged him to fly to Copenhagen to try to break the deadlock. His political advisers were opposed, not wanting to pull the boss away from a crowded domestic agenda for a diplomatic caper that looked as if it was going to end badly. Obama, though, had promised, like Clinton, to get serious about climate change. He trusted her diagnosis: that only the American President could broker a compromise. So on the evening of December 3, 2009, he ordered Air Force One fueled up for a flight to Denmark.

Twenty-four hours later, he was being briefed by an exasperated Clinton inside a small coffee bar in a shopping mall adjacent to the conference center that had been closed for the meeting. When it became clear that the Chinese delegation was trying to water down any agreement, holing up in a conference room with windows taped over to conceal their dealings from the Americans, Obama and Clinton decided to take matters into their own hands. They set off to confront the Chinese in person, fast-walking down a hallway and up a flight of stairs, panicked aides in chase, before they ran into a Chinese official in the doorway, waving his arms and shouting, “Not ready yet.”

Confusion swirled as Clinton and Obama tried to find out who was in the room with the Chinese. An advance person told them it was the Indians, the Brazilians, and the South Africans. Now Clinton was mad: The Indians had told American officials they had already left for the airport. A major developing country was lying to avoid dealing with the United States on climate change? She and Obama looked at each other in disbelief. “C’mon, let’s just do this,” he said to Clinton. She moved first, ducking under the outstretched arm of a Chinese security guard and barging into the room, which drew a collective gasp from the leaders huddled around a conference table. Obama was right behind her. “Hi, everybody!” he bellowed, like a dad coming home early to find his teenage kids throwing a keg party in the backyard. “Mr. Prime Minister, are you ready to see me now?” he said, turning to face the nonplussed Chinese premier, Wen Jiabao, who was anything but.

– Mark Landler, Alter Egos: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and the Twilight Struggle Over American Power (BOOK | KINDLE).

This story about President Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton teaming up like they were in a buddy-cop movie and crashing a meeting at the Copenhagen climate change summit is one of my favorite anecdotes from the Obama Administration.

5

For the Chinese premiere of the film in Shanghai, Emma Watson pulled out her most arresting look yet . In a beaded and jeweled champagne Elie Saab Couture gown with a lengthy cape that trailed behind her, Watson looked like she’d stepped out of a fairy tale.

The dramatic dress made for an appealing photo op and provided a nice contrast to costar Dan Stevens’s periwinkle blue suit, but as always, Watson’s interest in luxury is informed by her concern for the environment. Created from surplus fabric—layers of tulle and crepe georgette silk—from a previous collection, the gown is an upcycled variation on couture. Watson and her stylist, Rebecca Corbin-Murray, have been smart about incorporating eco-fashion into the actress’s wardrobe, and with this latest look they offer another take on glamour.

youtube

Great video with all the arrivals and the press conference (with a long of waiting time in between, but hang in there, it is worth it to get to the press conference) from Wonder Woman’s Chinese premiere in Shanghai on May 15th, 2017. 

Big thank you to whomever posted it! 

For lots of material from this premiere check out the following: 

http://pinefinemine.tumblr.com/

http://pine-farr.tumblr.com/

https://twitter.com/tracking_ontrek

reuters.com
EU and China to hold summit on June 2, focus on climate
The European Union and China will hold a summit in Brussels on June 2, four EU officials said, the first since the election of U.S. President Donald Trump that has united the two economic powers against global warming and trade protectionism.

Notice who’s missing from this summit meeting.

Excerpt:

The European Union and China will hold a summit in Brussels on June 2, four EU officials said, the first since the election of U.S. President Donald Trump that has united the two economic powers against global warming and trade protectionism.

China’s premier and the heads of the European Union’s main institutions will aim to deliver a strong statement in support of the Paris climate deal that Trump has threatened to withdraw from, the officials said.

China asked that the annual the summit, normally held in mid-July, be brought forward to press home President Xi Jinping’s defense of open trade at the World Economic Forum in Davos in January, in response to Trump’s protective stance.

While the date has not formally been announced, EU officials said it had been agreed with Beijing. The EU’s top diplomat Federica Mogherini met Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in mid-April and said afterwards that she had discussed the summit.

“The EU and China will send a very, very clear message that we will stick to the Paris climate agreement regardless of what the United States does,” said one EU official. “Climate is a big part of the summit … It is very high on the agenda.”

Pirates of the Caribbean 5 World Premiere, Shanghai

Last week, the world premiere of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales was held here in China at the Shanghai Disneyland Resort!

Fans lined up from early morning for the red carpet event…

Two of my favorite cosplayers from Japan even in flew in and did their best Jack Sparrow impersonations hoping to get Johnny Depp’s attention…

Johnny Depp, Javier Bardem, Geoffrey Rush, Orlando Bloom and Brenton Thwaites were all in attendance at the event…

So why am I posting this on Eataku, you may ask? What’s it got to do with food? Well, you see, at the after party, they served special chocolates molded into the shape of Captain Jack’s iconic compass, which plays a big part in this fifth Pirates film…

(Picture by Lisa Huang)

But I’m not going to spoil it for you!

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales open May 26th!

The speech by Premier Zhou Enlai was focused primarily on the situation in Czechoslovakia. He said that the Soviet Union committed ‘a violent crime against the Czechoslovak people,’ that this type of behavior is 'the most shameless, typical example of behavior by a fascist power,’ and that the Chinese government and Chinese people 'condemn this crime of aggression’ and are behind the Czechoslovak people. Comparing what was happening in Czechoslovakia with what Hitler did in that country, and what the US did in Vietnam, Premier Zhou Enlai stressed that 'Soviet revisionism degenerated into Social[ist]- Imperialism and Social[ist]-Fascism,’ and that the US and the Soviet Union are trying to divide the world [among themselves].
— 

Excerpt from A series of three telegrams reporting on a reception held at the Romanian Embassy in Beijing on August 23, 1968. Premier Zhou Enlai attended the event and gave a speech condemning the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia.

Text available via the Wilson Center Archives.

___________________

I got a request to cover some of the “Cold War” era as it happened in Asia (outside the U.S.) Americans are often taught the Cold War through a rather binary lens, in a strictly East-West/Soviet-U.S./Communist-Capitalist divide.

Of course, things are more nuanced than that. This is a snippet of a telegram report from 1968 which sheds light on the ups and downs of international diplomacy.

Here, Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai criticizes the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia which had happened three days earlier on August 20, 1968. The Soviet Union had led Warsaw Pact troops into Prague, with the intent to crack down on reformist trends. These troops had been gathered from the Soviet Union, Poland, Hungary, East Germany, and Bulgaria under the guise of Warsaw Pact military exercises. Instead of exercises, however, the Warsaw Pact troops overtook Prague.

Soviet invasion in Czechoslovakia was quick, and Soviet leaders justified the action under the “Brezhnev Doctrine” - claiming the Moscow could invoke the right to intervene wherever a country’s Communist government had been threatened. These actions furthered what is known at the Sino-Soviet split, a conflict developed over diverging USSR and PRC (China) interests and interpretations of communism.

The introduction of the Brezhnev doctrine in this way sparked concerns in Beijing that with time, the USSR would use it as a way to justify either interfering in Chinese communist affairs or invading China.