Chinese Mask

Chinese Mask
Many colors are used in any given Chinese mask, but the dominant colors impart specific characteristics. 

Black means that the character is neutral. It also indicates impartiality and integrity.

White face indicates that the character is evil and hypocritical. 

Red used on mask indicates a positive character, intelligence and bravery. It can also mean prosperity, loyalty, courage and heroism.

Purple is sometimes used as a substitute for red and in its own right, it represents justice and sophistication.

Green shows that the character is violent, impulsive and lacks restraint.

Blue masks are an indication of neutrality, stubbornness, astuteness and fierceness. 

Gold and silver show that the character is a god or demon. It may also indicate that the character is a ghost or spirit. These two colors also symbolize mystery.

Yellow mask indicates that the character is cruel, evil, hypocritical, ambitious or sly.

Chinese Mask
Many colors are used in any given Chinese mask, but the dominant colors impart specific characteristics. 

Black means that the character is neutral. It also indicates impartiality and integrity.

White face indicates that the character is evil and hypocritical. 

Red used on mask indicates a positive character, intelligence and bravery. It can also mean prosperity, loyalty, courage and heroism.

Purple is sometimes used as a substitute for red and in its own right, it represents justice and sophistication.

Green shows that the character is violent, impulsive and lacks restraint.

Blue masks are an indication of neutrality, stubbornness, astuteness and fierceness. 

Gold and silver show that the character is a god or demon. It may also indicate that the character is a ghost or spirit. These two colors also symbolize mystery.

Yellow mask indicates that the character is cruel, evil, hypocritical, ambitious or sly.

Ladybug, at last! Again, true to the actual character, Ladybug’s design was the last one I could come up with. The inspiration was “cheongsam” and the parasol an absolute MUST, but the rest was up to me! I’ve seen a lot of really talented designers and artists do their take on Ladybug alternate designs, but I didn’t want her spots to be straight-up solid black dots. Then I found this Chinese brocade online that was red with black symbols and gold borders all over it and Reyna just about DIED with delight. Unfortunately, we didn’t think to change the symbol on the illustrated fabric to the one pictured here in red, which means “Luck.” D’oh! So use your imagination, yeah? The black design on the red swath goes on the parasol and should be familiar to you Miraculous folks. ;D

Her mask was also an interesting creative exercise. Partially inspired by traditional Chinese masks, but only a little bit. Go on and Google them to see what I mean. But Tikki is represented with the black Yin, so I kinda springboarded off of that. And Reyna suggested antenna, which I thought was cute, so there we are!

Can you spot Marinette’s signature? ;) I don’t blame you if you can’t, it’s not written very clearly; my brush got a little shaky on me, though rest assured she did it better on the real deal. :D

Please do not repost. Do not remove my signature. Do not take credit for all my hard work. This is traditionally drawn and painted, folks, mistakes and all, with only the Luck symbol being digitally added after it was finished. I don’t do digital art, so this took way longer than you might think.

One Hundred Peking Opera Characters. Qing Dynasty 1600s-1911, China late 1800s, artist unknown. In the opera boom of the late 19th century, albums were turned to a new purpose: documenting the variety and vibrancy of stage culture in all its multicolored splendor. This album records in detail the makeup&costume of 100 characters drawn from nine plays/operas shown in Peking. Each character is identified w/an inscription&the plays are named@the top right of nine of the leaves in slightly larger script.

Antique Chilcat mask with Chinese coins set in as eyes.

Handbook of Aboriginal American Antiquities

William Henry Holmes
Washington: Government Printing Office, 1919.

‘A good example of an art transfer which lies somewhere near the border between the historic and the pre-European invasion of the Pacific and is thus under the ban of modernity is exemplified by an old Chilcat mask having bronze Chinese coins set in the eye sockets (fig. 18). This specimen, which is described by Lieut. Bolles, was obtained from the grave of an old “medicine man who had flourished more than two hundred years ago, six successors having filled this office; each one living to a good old age.” The Indians were entirely ignorant of the origin and significance of the coins forming the eyes of the specimen. This and many other occurrences are regarded as suggestive of indefinitely early intercourse between the New World and the Old World across the Pacific, but are not decisive.’