Childrens-Television

The LEGO Movie was my favorite movie of 2014, but it strikes me that the main character was male, because I feel like in our current culture, he HAD to be. The whole point of Emmett is that he’s the most boring average person in the world. It’s impossible to imagine a female character playing that role, because according to our pop culture, if she’s female she’s already SOMEthing, because she’s not male. The baseline is male. The average person is male.

You can see this all over but it’s weirdly prevalent in children’s entertainment. Why are almost all of the muppets dudes, except for Miss Piggy, who’s a parody of femininity? Why do all of the Despicable Me minions, genderless blobs, have boy names? I love the story (which I read on Wikipedia) that when the director of The Brave Little Toaster cast a woman to play the toaster, one of the guys on the crew was so mad he stormed out of the room. Because he thought the toaster was a man. A TOASTER. The character is a toaster.

I try to think about that when writing new characters— is there anything inherently gendered about what this character is doing? Or is it a toaster?

—  Bojack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg commenting on how weird gendered defaults in entertainment are, and why we should think twice about them. Excerpted from this longer original post.

because stupid humans. 

Human: tsk… of all the stupid things this idiot could do… look, they picked up a blue ringed octopus! 

Human 2: is it dangerous? 

Human: it’s australian, golden with bright blue circles. of course it’s deadly. 

Human 2: oh dear, how can one be so stupid to pick up random animals in australia??? 

Alien: what’s with australia? 

Human: well, everyone knows that australian animals are ten times more deadly than everywhere else. you don’t go picking up animals in australia, unless it’s a quokka. pretty much everything else is venomous, highly aggressive, or brings diseases. a combination of the three is possible.

Human 2: I remember that they had to censor an episode of a children tv show because it taught not to be afraid of spiders… in australia you MUST be afraid of spiders. 

Alien: so… let me get this straight. you come from what we define as a Death World, and yet on your death world there is a place even more dangerous??

Human: well… yes.

Guys if you never read the Roman Mysteries series you missed out they are some of the greatest kids books ever i swear to god i mean it’s four kids gallivanting about the roman empire solving mysteries, it’s so historically accurate it hurts and the story manages to get the characters involved in most of the big events in roman history it a way that totally works, and did you say representation bcus holy shit are these books full of it - from the beautiful, kind, gentle, slave girl Nubia to a family of Jews (whose stories are greatly affected by the persecution of jews in the roman era, including the sacking of Jerusalem) to a mute homeless boy who is an incredible artist, I mean these are kids books, which are hardly known for having great representation in them. They have platonic friendships between boys and girls, they have exiting storylines, they have DOGS, they have pirates and prophets and emperors and gladiators, seriously there isn’t one problem with these books they are genius.

OH and it was a pretty incredible TV show. Yeah. Its fucking amazing.

For the first time in a decade, the classic children’s television show Sesame Street will introduce a new Muppet on the air.

Her name is Julia. She’s a shy and winsome 4-year-old, with striking red hair and green eyes. Julia likes to paint and pick flowers. When Julia speaks, she often echoes what she’s just heard her friends Abby and Elmo say. Julia has autism.

Julia, A Muppet With Autism, Joins The Cast Of ‘Sesame Street’

Photo via Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop

to be honest playhouse disney from back in the day does not get the recognition it deserves…. rollie pollie ollie?? bear in the big blue house??? out of the box???? this is some peak children’s television people show some goddamn respect 

pointless headcanon: the unicorn glade isn’t ‘in’ Gravity Falls in any sense, it’s just that henges serve as gateways to the Otherworld with the right activation chant. the chant is Druidic because most henges are in the British Isles, but one of them somehow turned up in Gravity Falls because of course it did.

as an interesting aside, if you try doing the chant at Carhenge, Ford shows up and yells at you. 

The Secret of the White Lion

Alternatively Titled: Local Girl Ignores Responsibilities in Favor of Overanalyzing Children’s TV Show

Alright so ever since we were shown this mural, which depicts Voltron fully assembled and a lion off to the side, some people have started discussing the possibility of there being a sixth lion. And since I have nothing better to do with my time (besides my midterms next week whaaaat), I thought I’d try to answer the question: if there is a White Lion, who would pilot it?

Now I don’t want to get too into the whole idea of “how likely is it that this is going to happen” because like? That’s hard to tell. But, I’d say that it at least makes narrative sense for there to be a sixth lion.

What Alfor faces throughout Zarkon’s fall is the very real possibility that the leader of their magic robot lion fighting team could easily end up crossing some sort of line and going too far. Alfor begins to doubt Zarkon’s leadership, and has several arguments with him about his judgment and his and Honerva’s hunger for power. It’s not that big a stretch for Alfor to go from “this dude could try to use Voltron for evil / go rogue / etc.” to “I need to have a back up in case he pulls some shit.”

And a hypothetical sixth lion could logically be that back up. If Alfor built one, the idea was probably for the lion to either be an alternative head for Voltron or just an alternative lion in general, in case any of the other lions were unavailable, so that they could still create Voltron even if someone went missing / ran off / turned evil. 

And there’s a pre-existing precedent for a physical white lion, too:

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I started [acting] when I was really young. My mom’s a children’s television writer, so I was involved and around from a very young age. When I was eight I did my first film with Rachel Ward and Bryan Brown, who are a quite well-respected Australian producer-director duo, and that just changed my whole perspective on what I could do in life and be. From there, I just kept doing it. And during my last year of school, I decided I was going to go overseas to try it.