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International Workers’ Day, also known as Labour Day in some places, is a celebration of laborers and the working classes that is promoted by the international labor movement, anarchists, socialists, and communists and occurs every year on May Day, 1 May, an ancient European spring holiday. The date was chosen for International Workers’ Day by the Second International to commemorate the Haymarket affair, which occurred in Chicago on 4 May 1886. This Day has its origins in the labour union movement, specifically the eight-hour day movement, which advocated eight hours for work, eight hours for recreation, and eight hours for rest.

Being a traditional European spring celebration, May Day is a national public holiday in many countries, but in only some of those countries is it celebrated specifically as “Labour Day” or “International Workers’ Day”. Some countries celebrate a Labour Day on other dates significant to them, such as the United States which celebrates Labor Day on the first Monday of September.

History

Beginning in the late 19th Century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, a variety of days were chosen by trade unionists as a day to celebrate labor. In the United States and Canada, a September holiday, called Labor or Labour Day, was first proposed in the 1880s. In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed a Labor Day holiday while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union (CLU)) of New York. Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882, after witnessing the annual labour festival held in Toronto, Canada. In 1887, Oregon was the first state of the United States to make it an official public holiday. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty U.S. states officially celebrated Labor Day. Thus by 1887 in North America, Labor Day was an established, official holiday but in September, not on 1 May.

1 May was chosen to be International Workers’ Day in order to commemorate the 4 May, 1886 Haymarket affair in Chicago. The police were trying to disperse a public assembly during a general strike for the eight-hour workday, when an unidentified person threw a bomb at the police. The police responded by firing on the workers, killing four demonstrators.

In 1889, a meeting in Paris was held by the first congress of the Second International, following a proposal by Raymond Lavigne which called for international demonstrations on the 1890 anniversary of the Chicago protests. May Day was formally recognized as an annual event at the International’s second congress in 1891. Subsequently, the May Day Riots of 1894 occurred. In 1904, the International Socialist Conference meeting in Amsterdam called on “all Social Democratic Party organizations and trade unions of all countries to demonstrate energetically on the First of May for the legal establishment of the 8-hour day, for the class demands of the proletariat, and for universal peace.” The congress made it “mandatory upon the proletarian organizations of all countries to stop work on 1 May, wherever it is possible without injury to the workers.” Across the globe, labor activists sought to make May Day an official holiday to honor labor and many countries have done so.

May Day has long been a focal point for demonstrations by various socialist, communist and anarchist groups. May Day has been an important official holiday in countries such as the People’s Republic of China, North Korea, Cubaand the former Soviet Union. May Day celebrations typically feature elaborate popular and military parades in these countries

In 1955, the Catholic Church dedicated 1 May to “Saint Joseph The Worker”. Saint Joseph is for the Church the patron saint of workers and craftsmen (among others).

During the Cold War, May Day became the occasional for large military parades in Red Square by the Soviet Union and attended by the top leaders of the Kremlin, especially the Politburo, atop Lenin’s Tomb. It became an enduring symbol of that period.

United States

In the United States, efforts to switch Labor Day from September to 1 May have not been successful. In 1921, following the Russian Revolution of 1917, 1 May was promoted as “Americanization Day” by the Veterans of Foreign Wars and other groups in opposition to communism. It became an annual event, sometimes featuring large rallies. In 1949, Americanization Day was renamed to Loyalty Day. In 1958, the U.S. Congress declared Loyalty Day, the U.S. recognition of 1 May, a national holiday; that same year, U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower proclaimed 1 May Law Day as well.

Unions and union locals in the United States — especially in urban areas with strong support for organised labour — have maintained a connection with labour traditions through their own unofficial observances on 1 May. Some of the largest examples of this occurred during the Great Depression of the 1930s, when hundreds of thousands of workers marched in May Day parades in New York’s Union Square. Radical organisations including anarchist groups and socialist and communist parties have kept the May Day tradition alive with rallies and demonstrations in such cities as New York, Chicago and Seattle, often with major union backing.

In 2006, 1 May was chosen by mostly Latino immigrant groups in the United States as the day for the Great American Boycott, a general strike of undocumented immigrant workers and supporters to protest H.R. 4437, immigration reform legislation which they felt was draconian. From 10 April to 1 May of that year, millions of immigrant families in the U.S. called for immigrant rights, workers rights and amnesty for undocumented workers. They were joined by socialist and other leftist organizations on 1 May. On 1 May, 2007, a mostly peaceful demonstration in Los Angeles in support of undocumented immigrant workers ended with a widely televised dispersal by police officers. In March 2008, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union announced that dockworkers will move no cargo at any West Coast ports on 1 May, 2008, as a protest against the continuation of the Iraq War and the diversion of resources from domestic needs. For May Day 2010, marches were being planned in many cities uniting immigrant and native workers including New York, San Francisco, Boston, Albany Chicago and Los Angeles most of whom protested against the Arizona Senate Bill 1070

On 1 May, 2012, members of Occupy Wall Street and labour unions held protests together in a number of cities in the United States and Canada to commemorate May Day and to protest the state of the economy and economic inequality.

Labour Day is being celebrated May 1 around the world and Google is marking the holiday with a Google Doodle.

The holiday is synonymous with International Workers’ Day and May Day in many countries.

Here’s what you need to know:

1. The Holiday Celebrates the Achievements of Workers

The holiday celebrates the achievements of workers around the world. It is celebrated on May 1 in most countries around the world.

The day has also been used by labor unions, socialists and other radicals to call attention to workers’ rights and call for change.

May Day 2015: All the Memes You Need to See

May 1, 2015 is May Day and also International Workers’ Day. This holiday was once a pagan celebration of flowers and later became designated to worker’s rights.

May 1, 2015 is May Day and also International Workers’ Day. This holiday was once a pagan celebration of flowers called Floralia, for the Roman goddess of flowers. It later became designated to worker’s rights by socialist and communist groups, commemorating the Haymarket affair in Chicago in 1886, in which police shot and killed protesters who were picketing for an 8-hour work day.

2. It Is Closely Linked to Labor Unions & Was First Celebrated in the 1880s

The holiday was first celebrated in the 1880s, according to a history of Labour Day posted on the Industrial Workers of the World website.

It is on May 1 to commemorate the May 1886 Haymarket Affair, which occurred in Chicago.

From May 1st to May 3rd 1886, 250,000 Chicago-area workers hit the streets to protest long working hours and call for factories to limit days to 8 hours. On May 3, police fired on the peaceful crowd and killed two workers. The rally was held the next day to protest police brutality. At about 10:30 a.m., a police line moved toward the rally and someone threw a bomb at the police, killing one and wounding six others. Police then opened fire and killed four workers, injuring several others.

The IWW says about why the holiday is celebrated:

Truly, history has a lot to teach us about the roots of our radicalism. When we remember that people were shot so we could have the 8-hour day; if we acknowledge that homes with families in them were burned to the ground so we could have Saturday as part of the weekend; when we recall 8-year old victims of industrial accidents who marched in the streets protesting working conditions and child labor only to be beat down by the police and company thugs, we understand that our current condition cannot be taken for granted – people fought for the rights and dignities we enjoy today, and there is still a lot more to fight for. The sacrifices of so many people can not be forgotten or we’ll end up fighting for those same gains all over again. This is why we celebrate May Day.

3. The Holiday Is Celebrated With Parades & Rallies

Labour Day has historically been a day for parades, rallies and other celebrations of workers.

Published on Apr 30, 2015

The workers celebrated international labor day with the marching band

International Workers’ Day, also known as Labour Day in some places, is a celebration of laborers and the working classes that is promoted by the international labor movement, anarchists, socialists, and communists and occurs every year on May Day, 1 May, an ancient European spring holiday.[1][2] The date was chosen for International Workers’ Day by the Second International to commemorate the Haymarket affair, which occurred in Chicago on 4 May 1886.[2] This Day has its origins in the labour union movement, specifically the eight-hour day movement, which advocated eight hours for work, eight hours for recreation, and eight hours for rest.[3]

Being a traditional European spring celebration, May Day is a national public holiday in many countries, but in only some of those countries is it celebrated specifically as “Labour Day” or “International Workers’ Day”. Some countries celebrate a Labour Day on other dates significant to them, such as the United States which celebrates Labor Day on the first Monday of September.

4. Unions & Other Labor Groups Plan to Use the Holiday to Fight For Workers’ Rights

Activists from the Indian Federation of Trade Unions, Communist trade union workers and factory workers hold placards during a protest against state and central government policies that they say negatively impact workers on International Labour Day in New Delhi on May 1, 2014. (Getty)

Many labor groups plan to rally on May 1 to call for worker rights, including better wages and conditions for workers.

Countries like Turkey were bracing for protests on May 1 after clashes between workers and security forces erupted in 2014,according to Al Arabiya. The country has a history of violence on May 1. In 1977, dozens of people were killed during protests at Taksim Square.

Protests are also expected in the United States, which also has a history of clashes between police and demonstrators on May Day. Demonstrations are scheduled in Seattle, Portland and Oakland, and protesters are expected to also continue calls for an end to police violence in the wake of Freddie Gray’s death and several police killings, according to CNN.

5. Labour Day Is Celebrated on Other Dates in the United States & Other Countries

In the United States and Canada, Labour Day is known as Labor Day and is celebrated on the first Monday of September, despite the fact that the original Labour Day originated in Chicago. It traditionally marks the end of summer, along with celebrating workers.

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1. Businesses have created more than 8.5 million private sector jobs in the past 47 months. Learn more … 2. After nearly collapsing, the U.S. auto industry has added nearly 250,000 jobs — the fastest pace of job growth in more than a decade. Learn more … 3. American manufacturers have added more than 500,000 jobs since January 2012, the strongest period of job growth since 1989. President Obama wants to boost that trend. Learn more … 4. Since 2009, the Small Business Administration has helped distribute more than $93 billion in loans for 166,000 small businesses. Learn More … 5. President Obama’s middle-class tax cuts, first signed into law in December 2010, are providing tax relief for 160 million workers to help jumpstart the economy. For the typical family, that’s $40 extra with each pay check. Learn more …

Raising the Minimum Wage to $10.10. As he said in his State of the Union speech on January 28th, President Obama will continue to call on Congress to pass the Harkin-Miller plan to raise the Federal minimum wage for working Americans in stages to $10.10 and index it to inflation thereafter, while also raising the minimum wage for tipped workers for the first time in over 20 years. The President knows this is important for workers and good for business.

4/30/14 The Senate GOP blocks the Minimum Wage Boost

Did You Know That Women Are Still Paid Less Than Men?

On average, full-time working women earn just 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. This substantial gap is more than a statistic — it has real life consequences. When women, who make up nearly half the workforce, bring home less money each day, it means they have less for the everyday needs of their families, and over a lifetime of work, far less savings for retirement.

President Obama supports passage of the Paycheck Fairness Act, a comprehensive and commonsense bill that updates and strengthens the Equal Pay Act of 1963, which made it illegal for employers to pay unequal wages to men and women who perform substantially equal work.

On April 11, 2013 the House GOP blocked the Paycheck Fairness Act from getting a vote.

On April 9, 2014 the Senate GOP blocked the Paycheck Fairness Act from getting a vote.

The Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) is legislation proposed in the United States Congress that would prohibit discrimination in hiring and employment on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity by civilian, nonreligious employers with at least 15 employees.

ENDA has been introduced in every Congress since 1994 except the 109th. Similar legislation has been introduced without passage since 1974. The bill gained its best chance at passing after the Democratic Party broke twelve years of Republican Congressional rule in the 2006 midterm elections.In 2007, gender identity protections were added to the legislation for the first time. Some sponsors believed that even with a Democratic majority, ENDA did not have enough votes to pass the House of Representatives with transgender inclusion and dropped it from the bill, which passed the House and then died in the Senate. President  George W. Bush threatened to veto the measure. LGBT advocacy organizations and the LGBT community were divided over support of the modified bill.

In 2009, following Democratic gains in the 2008 elections, and after the divisiveness of the 2007 debate, Rep. Barney Frank introduced a transgender-inclusive version of ENDA. He introduced it again in 2011, and Sen. Jeff Merkley introduced it in the Senate. President Barack Obama supports the bill’s passage.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Employment_Non-Discrimination_Act

Statement by the President on Senate Passage of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act of 2013

November 07, 2013

For more than two centuries, the story of our nation has been the story of more citizens realizing the rights and freedoms that are our birthright as Americans. Today, a bipartisan majority in the Senate took another important step in this journey by passing the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which would help end the injustice of our fellow Americans being denied a job or fired just because they are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. Just as no one in the United States can lose their job simply because of their race, gender, religion or a disability, no one should ever lose their job simply because of who they are or who they love.

Today’s victory is a tribute to all those who fought for this progress ever since a similar bill was introduced after the Stonewall riots more than three decades ago. In particular, I thank Majority Leader Reid, Chairman Harkin, Senators Merkley and Collins for their leadership, and Senator Kirk for speaking so eloquently in support of this legislation. Now it’s up to the House of Representatives. This bill has the overwhelming support of the American people, including a majority of Republican voters, as well as many corporations, small businesses and faith communities. They recognize that our country will be more just and more prosperous when we harness the God-given talents of every individual.

One party in one house of Congress should not stand in the way of millions of Americans who want to go to work each day and simply be judged by the job they do. Now is the time to end this kind of discrimination in the workplace, not enable it. I urge the House Republican leadership to bring this bill to the floor for a vote and send it to my desk so I can sign it into law. On that day, our nation will take another historic step toward fulfilling the founding ideals that define us as Americans.

Thank you PRO PRESIDENT OBAMA BLOG for contributing information.

New Google Doodle Celebrates International Labour Day

The holiday has its origins in the 19th century labor movement

It may have a different date in the U.S., but many countries around the world will be taking a public holiday Friday to celebrate the international Labour Day, and Google is marking the event with a new Doodle

Labour Day, also called International Workers’ Day or May Day, has its origins in the late 19th century labor movement. One of the most significant contributors to Labour Day was the Haymarket Massacre.

On May 4, 1886, a Chicago, Ill., bombing killed seven police officers along with four civilians. The dynamite blast was a response to the killings of peaceful demonstrators by police the day before. After the bombing, eight anarchists were convicted of conspiracy and sentenced to death. The case created international headlines because the evidence suggested none of those eight men actually threw the bomb.

Three years later, a French socialist party created an international day to honor the labor movement and marked May 1 in commemoration of the Haymarket Massacre.

The Google Doodle honors the Labor Day origins with graphics showing traditional manual labor tools such as a wrench and tape measure.

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Educational documentary on your friendly neighborhood FBI, circa the 1970s. Made available courtesy of the Department of Defense, the National Technical Information Service, and the National Archives and Records Administration.

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Post office boxes at the US Post Office in Chicago’s Federal Center, designed by Mies van der Rohe.

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O Summit reuniu líderes governamentais e especialistas da indústria financeira de todo o mundo, incluindo Thomaz E. Perez, Secretário do Trabalho dos Estados Unidos, além de ONG´s, com o objetivo de discutir a inclusão financeira dos Millennials, por meio de tecnologias móveis. Segundo especialistas que participaram das palestras, o maior desafio nos dias de hoje é criar soluções para melhorar a educação financeira para este público.

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NY Fed moves to Chicago due to threat of possible Natural Disaster | FLOW OF WISDOM

Screenshot: Reuters.com

This is the first segment of the first hour of my broadcast on April 19, 2015.

I discuss the Reuters report on the NY federal reserve moving to Chicago due to EMP threat or natural disaster. I also touch on some other interesting facts to add to the puzzle of the shift that’s taking place in corporate business, the Government and Military.

Here is the link to the article:

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Website of the Week - Money Smart Week

Want to impress your friends? Of course you do, and what better way than by showing them all the new financial tips and strategies you learned during Money Smart Week. It’s also our Website of the Week - if you had any doubt. ;)

An initiative to help consumers with and without disabilities better manage their personal finances, Money Smart Week (April 18-25) helps people like YOU not only see where their money goes, but how to better save, plan for retirement, dig out from debt and/or buy a home.

Impress your friends and family, and maybe teach them a lesson or two with our Website of the Week. They’ll thank you, and we will too!

Talk about giving new meaning to the phrase, “green with envy.” lol

Happy Money Smart Week. 

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