Charles Beaudelaire

Voici venir les temps où vibrant sur sa tige
Chaque fleur s'évapore ainsi qu'un encensoir ;
Les sons et les parfums tournent dans l'air du soir ;
Valse mélancolique et langoureux vertige !

Chaque fleur s'évapore ainsi qu'un encensoir ;
Le violon frémit comme un coeur qu'on afflige ;
Valse mélancolique et langoureux vertige !
Le ciel est triste et beau comme un grand reposoir.

Le violon frémit comme un coeur qu'on afflige,
Un coeur tendre, qui hait le néant vaste et noir !
Le ciel est triste et beau comme un grand reposoir ;
Le soleil s'est noyé dans son sang qui se fige.

Un coeur tendre, qui hait le néant vaste et noir,
Du passé lumineux recueille tout vestige !
Le soleil s'est noyé dans son sang qui se fige…
Ton souvenir en moi luit comme un ostensoir !

—  Harmonie du soir, Charles Beaudelaire (in Les Fleurs du Mal)
L'Etranger

- Qui aimes-tu le mieux, homme enigmatique, dis? ton père, ta mère, ta soeur ou ton frère?
- Je n'ai ni père, ni mère, ni soeur, ni frère.
- Tes amis?
-Vous vous servez là d'une parole dont le sens m'est resté jusqu'à ce jour inconnu.
- Ta patrie?
- J'ignore sous quelle latitude elle est située.
- La beauté?
- Je l'aimerais volontiers, déesse et immortelle.
- L'or?
- Je le hais comme vous haïssez Dieu.
- Eh! qu'aimes-tu donc, extraordinaire étranger?

- J'aime les nuages… les nuages qui passent… là-bas… là-bas… les merveilleux nuages!

 

“Petits poèmes en prose”, Charles Beaudelaire

 Man and the Sea

Free man, you will always cherish the sea!
The sea is your mirror; you contemplate your soul
In the infinite unrolling of its billows;
Your mind is an abyss that is no less bitter.

You like to plunge into the bosom of your image;
You embrace it with eyes and arms, and your heart
Is distracted at times from its own clamoring
By the sound of this plaint, wild and untamable.

Both of you are gloomy and reticent:
Man, no one has sounded the depths of your being;
O Sea, no person knows your most hidden riches,
So zealously do you keep your secrets!

Yet for countless ages you have fought each other
Without pity, without remorse,
So fiercely do you love carnage and death,
O eternal fighters, implacable brothers! 

Charles Baudelaire

One thing (among many) I love about One Piece is how different and interesting most antagonists are. They have deep and rich personalities, sometimes a cool backstory too, great strength, funny laughters (!), great character designs, etc. But there’s one antagonist we scarcely talk about, and in my (humble) opinion it counts as one of the most - if not THE most - important of them all : the Sea.

If you think about it, One Piece is all about crossing the most unpredictable and dangerous oceans in the world to find a treasure. No Sea, no pirates. No pirates, no One Piece. No One Piece, no fun. Isn’t sailing the perilous Grand Line the first real (and expected) challenge to take up in order to become the Pirate King?

The Sea is the first antagonist Luffy ever met. Shanks used to make fun of him as a child for not being able to swim! Then Luffy became a rubberman, thus making the Sea a mortal enemy. Poor boy doesn’t even know how to navigate on his own! With Nami’s help, he could make it so far to the New World with everyone safe, but how many times have they thought they were gonna die in a storm, swallowed by the Sea’s watery mouth, how often have they feared she would steal them all, take them in her furious arms, bring them against her abyssal womb and cradle them goodbye? How many sea creatures have they faced? How many terribly dangerous phenomenons have they witnessed when the Sea got so angry and violent?

“Wild and untamable" The Sea’s unpredictable, destructive, hazardous. The Sea doesn’t care which side you’re in, won’t consider your position, age, rank, sex, family or friends. Not matter how strong you are, if you ate a Devil’s Fruit or can use haki, the Sea does what she wants. The Sea is brutal yet fascinating and mysterious, moody, bitter and cold as death but also full of life; she’s a restless graveyard (Merry *sobs*), infinitely beautiful, forever untamed, eternally FREE.
Luffy once stated: ”I don’t want to conquer anything. I just think the guy with the most freedom in this whole ocean is the Pirate King!“. I also see it that way: you only get freedom if you can, somehow, understand the Sea. Make it your friend, your ally, your family. Sail with it, not against it. Learn to respect it.

O eternal fighters, implacable brothers!“ Because the Sea isn’t just one antagonist. It’s also the path to everyone’s dreams, the salty string that brought the Strawhats together, their everyday home. It’s the nest of the world! Just like our Blue Planet… just look at the maps to see how vast the Sea is in the OP universe. Even the Wold Government’s flag depicts it: the four dots don’t symbolize different countries or organizations, but the four Oceans: North Blue, South Blue, East Blue and West Blue. And we’re not even talking about All Blue! We’re all children of the Sea… as stated by Whitebeard. The Sea carries everyone’s hopes and dreams, but she can also crush them all in a heartbeat.

"The sea is your mirror; you contemplate your soul" And eventually… the Sea’ll be there at the end of the Strawhats’s journey. She’ll be the last obstacle to the One Piece, I’m sure of it. And once Luffy finds it, once he reaches his dream and gets the Great Treasure, he’ll finally be… as free as the Sea itself. Her equal, her brother.

Free man, you will always cherish the Sea.

Lasciami respirare a lungo, a lungo, l’odore dei tuoi capelli. affondarvi tutta la faccia, come un assetato nell’acqua di una sorgente, e agitarli con la mano come un fazzoletto odoroso, per scuotere dei ricordi nell’aria.
Se tu sapessi tutto quello che vedo! tutto quello che sento! tutto quello che intendo nei tuoi capelli! La mia anima viaggia sul profumo come l'anima degli altri viaggia sulla musica.
I tuoi capelli contengono tutto un sogno, pieno di vele e di alberature: contengono grandi mari, i cui monsoni mi portano verso climi incantevoli, dove lo spazio è più bello e più profondo, dove l’atmosfera è profumata dai frutti. dalle foglie e dalla pelle umana.
Nell’oceano della tua capigliatura, intravedo un porto brulicante di canti malinconici, di uomini vigorosi di ogni nazione e di navi di ogni forma, che intagliano le loro architetture fini e complicate su ün cielo immenso dove si abbandona il calore eterno.
Nelle carezze della tua capigliatura, io ritrovo i languori delle lunghe ore passate su un divano, nella camera di una bella nave, cullate dal rullio impercettibile del porto, tra i vasi da fiori e gli orcioli che rinfrescano.
Nell’ardente focolare della tua capigliatura, respiro l’odore del tabacco, confuso a quello dell’oppio e dello zucchero: nella notte della tua capigliatura, vedo risplendere l’infinito dell'azzurro tropicale; sulle rive lanuginose della tua capigliatura, mi inebrio degli odori combinati del catrame, del muschio e dell’olio di cocco.
Lasciami mordere a lungo le tue trecce pesanti e nere. Quando mordicchio i tuoi capelli elastici e ribelli, mi sembra di mangiare dei ricordi.
—  Charles Pierre Baudelaire.

Moi aussi j'ai envie de mettre de la poésie tiens !

L'albatros

Souvent, pour s'amuser, les hommes d'équipage
Prennent des albatros, vastes oiseaux des mers,
Qui suivent, indolents compagnons de voyage,
Le navire glissant sur les gouffres amers.

A peine les ont-ils déposés sur les planches,
Que ces rois de l'azur, maladroits et honteux,
Laissent piteusement leurs grandes ailes blanches
Comme des avirons traîner à côté d'eux.

Ce voyageur ailé, comme il est gauche et veule !
Lui, naguère si beau, qu'il est comique et laid !
L'un agace son bec avec un brûle-gueule,
L'autre mime, en boitant, l'infirme qui volait !

Le Poète est semblable au prince des nuées 
Qui hante la tempête et se rit de l'archer ;
Exilé sur le sol au milieu des huées,
Ses ailes de géant l'empêchent de marcher.

Viens sur mon cœur, âme cruelle et sourde,
Tigre adoré, monstre aux airs indolents;
Je veux longtemps plonger mes doigts tremblants
Dans l'épaisseur de ta crinière lourde
—  Charles Beaudelaire, “Les Fleurs du Mal”