Center for Disease Control

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Shepard Smith: ‘Do Not Listen To The Hysterical Voices’ In The Media About Ebola

“Someday there may be a real panic,” said Shepard Smith. “Someday, something may start spreading that they can’t control. And then, do you know what we’re gonna have to do? We’re gonna have to relax and listen to leaders. We’re not gonna panic when we’re supposed to and we’re certainly not gonna panic now. We have to stop it.” Watch his full speech on Ebola here. 

shape.com
Gonorrhea Might Soon Be Untreatable
~ Condoms ~ Condoms ~ Condoms ~

OK people, we have a really important thing to say about this. OK. Ready?

If you get antibiotics to treat an STD YOU REALLY GOTTA TAKE ALL OF THEM AS DIRECTED. Even if you feel a bit better, or a sore heals up, or whatever. Seriously. When you do not take all of your meds you may not actually clear up your infection. And what happens then? THIS:

Health officials have been warning us about the threat of “super gonorrhea"—a strain of the sexually transmitted disease that is resistant to all known antibiotics—for over a year. But the superbug is here, much faster than previously anticipated. On Wednesday the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced a cluster of gonorrhea infections that shows both decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone and very high-level resistance to azithromycin. It’s the first time this superbug has been found in the U.S.

5 Ways You Definitely Won’t Get Ebola

Ebola has infected an estimated 7,470 people and claimed the lives of 3,431, mostly in West Africa. These numbers, as well as the death of Thomas Eric Duncan in Dallas, Texas on Wednesday, are a fearsome testament to how rapidly the virus can decimate a community. So find out in detail the five ways you won’t contract the virus. 

so the new HHS is not only after Obamacare but also Hillary’s CHIP

As HHS secretary, Price would not only oversee Obamacare as it currently exists, but also run the government’s largest social programs, including Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. He would also have authority over the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health and other major health agencies.

HHS employs nearly 80,000 people and is the largest source of funding for medical research in the world.

Politically, Price is conservative. He opposes abortion rights, receiving a 2016 rating of 0 by Planned Parenthood and 100 percent by National Right to Life. He has voted against legislation aimed at prohibiting job discrimination based on sexual orientation; for a constitutional amendment to define marriage as between one man and one woman; and against the bill that would’ve ended the don’t-ask-don’t-tell policy regarding disclosure of sexual orientation in the military.

He has also voted against: federal funding for abortion; funding for groups like Planned Parenthood; a law that now requires the FDA to regulate tobacco as a drug; and a bill that would have provided four weeks of parental leave for federal employees.

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The graying of AIDS – Stories from an aging pandemic

Wherever people have access to lifesaving treatment, what was once thought impossible has become increasingly common: people with HIV/AIDS are living into their 50s, 60s, and beyond. As of 2015, half of all people living with HIV in the United States are age 50 or older, and by 2020 that percentage is expected to rise to 70%. More than 3 million people age 50+ are thought to be living positive in Sub-Saharan Africa alone, a number that could triple by 2040.

Ageist beliefs about who is at risk for HIV regularly get in the way of potentially life-saving information being shared with so-called “older adults.” (When tracking HIV/AIDS statistics, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines people over age 50 as “older adults.”) Here in the U.S., people age 50 and older are more likely to be diagnosed with HIV later in their disease progression towards AIDS than their younger counterparts; as a result, older adults often start treatment late and regularly suffer from more HIV-related health problems. Again, ageism plays a role: whether because of lack of training or cultural taboos and social discomfort, health care providers are less likely to ask their older patients about their sex lives or substance use, and are less likely to test those patients for HIV.

Around the world, HIV/AIDS data collection often stops at age 49, so the numbers we have are often estimates based on projections grounded in data gathered on younger positive adults. What we know with certainty is that the need for aging-related HIV/AIDS services will continue to grow as future generations have the opportunity to age with the virus. But there are a lot of questions that need answers: What new medical challenges will arise from decades of living with HIV/AIDS, prolonged use of antiviral medications, and aging itself? What kind of support will HIV-positive older adults need in the long-term? What are we doing to prevent new HIV transmissions among adults later in life? And how can we best take advantage of the wealth of experience, passion, and insights this pioneering generation has to share?

______________________

The Graying of AIDS is a collaborative documentary project created by visual journalist Katja Heinemann and health educator Naomi Schegloff. For five years the team has worked to create media stories, multimedia art installations, innovative public health awareness campaigns with NGO partners, and educational materials that engage diverse audiences. The on-going “Stories from an Aging Pandemic” project is a participatory documentary installation and online archive. The Graying of AIDS team works with HIV-positive adults aged 50+ in a pop-up photo studio and interview station, creating a collective portrait of the first generation of adults able to grow “old” with HIV/AIDS. Thus far, more than 100 people representing 17 countries and 4 indigenous nations have participated in the project at the last two biennial International AIDS Conferences in the U.S. and Australia; the team hopes to travel to the next conference in South Africa in 2016 to complete the series for the 20th anniversary of HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), the multi-drug antiretroviral therapy that made aging with HIV a possibility for so many.

Photography by Katja Heinemann/Interviews by Naomi Schegloff

See more images from The graying of AIDS and our other slideshows on Yahoo News!

CDC.. this on the fucking CDC website WTF

Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse

Categories: General

May 16th, 2011 11:48 am ET  -  Ali S. Khan

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There are all kinds of emergencies out there that we can prepare for. Take a zombie apocalypse for example. That’s right, I said z-o-m-b-i-e a-p-o-c-a-l-y-p-s-e. You may laugh now, but when it happens you’ll be happy you read this, and hey, maybe you’ll even learn a thing or two about how to prepare for a real emergency.

A Brief History of Zombies
We’ve all seen at least one movie about flesh-eating zombies taking over (my personal favorite is Resident Evil

), but where do zombies come from and why do they love eating brains so much? The word zombie comes from Haitian and New Orleans voodoo origins. Although its meaning has changed slightly over the years, it refers to a human corpse mysteriously reanimated to serve the undead. Through ancient voodoo and folk-lore traditions, shows like the Walking Dead were born.

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A couple dressed as zombies - Danny Zucco and Sandy Olsson from the movie Grease walking in the annual Toronto Zombie Walk.

In movies, shows, and literature, zombies are often depicted as being created by an infectious virus, which is passed on via bites and contact with bodily fluids. Harvard psychiatrist Steven Schlozman wrote a (fictional) medical paper on the zombies presented in Night of the Living Dead

and refers to the condition as Ataxic Neurodegenerative Satiety Deficiency Syndrome caused by an infectious agent. The Zombie Survival Guide
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identifies the cause of zombies as a virus called solanum. Other zombie origins shown in films include radiation from a destroyed NASA
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Venus
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probe (as in Night of the Living Dead
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), as well as mutations of existing conditions such as prions
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, mad-cow disease
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, measles
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and rabies
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.

The rise of zombies in pop culture has given credence to the idea that a zombie apocalypse could happen. In such a scenario zombies would take over entire countries, roaming city streets eating anything living that got in their way. The proliferation of this idea has led many people to wonder “How do I prepare for a zombie apocalypse?”

Well, we’re here to answer that question for you, and hopefully share a few tips about preparing for real emergencies too!

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Some of the supplies for your emergency kit

Better Safe than Sorry

So what do you need to do before zombies…or hurricanes or pandemics for example, actually happen? First of all, you should have an emergency kit in your house. This includes things like water, food, and other supplies to get you through the first couple of days before you can locate a zombie-free refugee camp (or in the event of a natural disaster, it will buy you some time until you are able to make your way to an evacuation shelter or utility lines are restored). Below are a few items you should include in your kit, for a full list visit the CDC Emergency page.

  • Water (1 gallon per person per day)
  • Food (stock up on non-perishable items that you eat regularly)
  • Medications (this includes prescription and non-prescription meds)
  • Tools and Supplies (utility knife, duct tape, battery powered radio, etc.)
  • Sanitation and Hygiene (household bleach, soap, towels, etc.)
  • Clothing and Bedding (a change of clothes for each family member and blankets)
  • Important documents (copies of your driver’s license, passport, and birth certificate to name a few)
  • First Aid supplies (although you’re a goner if a zombie bites you, you can use these supplies to treat basic cuts and lacerations that you might get during a tornado or hurricane)

Once you’ve made your emergency kit, you should sit down with your family and come up with an emergency plan. This includes where you would go and who you would call if zombies started appearing outside your door step. You can also implement this plan if there is a flood, earthquake, or other emergency.

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Family members meeting by their mailbox. You should pick two meeting places, one close to your home and farther away

  1. Identify the types of emergencies that are possible in your area. Besides a zombie apocalypse, this may include floods, tornadoes, or earthquakes. If you are unsure contact your local Red Cross chapter for more information.
  2. Pick a meeting place for your family to regroup in case zombies invade your home…or your town evacuates because of a hurricane. Pick one place right outside your home for sudden emergencies and one place outside of your neighborhood in case you are unable to return home right away.
  3. Identify your emergency contacts. Make a list of local contacts like the police, fire department, and your local zombie response team. Also identify an out-of-state contact that you can call during an emergency to let the rest of your family know you are ok.
  4. Plan your evacuation route. When zombies are hungry they won’t stop until they get food (i.e., brains), which means you need to get out of town fast! Plan where you would go and multiple routes you would take ahead of time so that the flesh eaters don’t have a chance! This is also helpful when natural disasters strike and you have to take shelter fast.

Never Fear – CDC is Ready

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Get a Kit, Make a Plan, Be Prepared

If zombies did start roaming the streets, CDC would conduct an investigation much like any other disease outbreak. CDC would provide technical assistance to cities, states, or international partners dealing with a zombie infestation. This assistance might include consultation, lab testing and analysis, patient management and care, tracking of contacts, and infection control (including isolation and quarantine). It’s likely that an investigation of this scenario would seek to accomplish several goals: determine the cause of the illness, the source of the infection/virus/toxin, learn how it is transmitted and how readily it is spread, how to break the cycle of transmission and thus prevent further cases, and how patients can best be treated. Not only would scientists be working to identify the cause and cure of the zombie outbreak, but CDC and other federal agencies would send medical teams and first responders to help those in affected areas (I will be volunteering the young nameless disease detectives for the field work).

To learn more about what CDC does to prepare for and respond to emergencies of all kinds, visit: http://emergency.cdc.gov/cdc/orgs_progs.asp

To learn more about how you can prepare for and stay safe during an emergency visit: http://emergency.cdc.gov/

Join the CDC Zombie Task Force! The CDC Foundation
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, a non-profit partner of CDC is offering Zombie Task Force t-shirts (click on the picture to find out more).  Proceeds go to benefit disaster relief efforts and other important health programs. Get yours before they’re gone…

Are you prepared? Tell us…

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Have you begun preparing for a zombie apocalypse? Or maybe you have been preparing for a more realistic threat like hurricanes or the next flu season? Tell us about what you are doing to prepare! Enter our video contest here: http://prepare.challenge.gov
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so just messing around with the CDCs (center for disease control and prevention) BMI calculator, if you’re extremely underweight (in BMI standards) with a BMI of 13 it says: “Talk to your healthcare provider and see IF you need to gain weight.” if you’re slightly “overweight” (in BMI standards) with a BMI of 25.1 it says “you should try to lose weight.” lmao. It doesn’t say “talk to your healthcare provider to see if you need to lose weight.” it just fuckin’ says lose weight. lmaao. all right. just take that in.

OOPS! The CDC gave nurse permission to travel by plane even after she informed them of her fever

As we reported earlier, the nurse who recently tested positive for Ebola rode on a flight from Cleveland to Dallas even though she already had a fever. After news broke, many (including myself) were questioning her decision to board a flight (or travel extensively at all) under the circumstances. As it turns out, it was the CDC who gave her the green light.

From WFAA Channel 8:

The second Dallas nurse diagnosed with Ebola shouldn’t have traveled on a commercial flight due to her exposure to the virus prior to her diagnosis, said Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But the CDC has now confirmed that it gave Amber Vinson permission to return to Dallas by air after making a trip to Ohio.

Vinson, 29, was identified by a family member as the nurse diagnosed with the virus. Like 26-year-old Nina Pham, who was diagnosed before her, Vinson was among those who had frequent contact with Duncan during his treatment at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas.

Frieden called the first days of Duncan’s diagnosis and isolation at the hospital the highest risk moments. He pinpointed those days between September 28 through September 30.

Read the Rest

Let’s recap a statement by the director of the CDC:

…if you are sick and you may have Ebola, should you get on a bus? And the answer to that is also no. You might become ill, you might have a problem that exposes someone around you

The CDC continues to contradict itself. 

Health Officials Say Up To 100 People May Have Been Exposed To Texas Ebola Patient

DALLAS, Oct 2 (Reuters) - Up to 100 people may have had direct or indirect contact with the first person to be diagnosed with the deadly Ebola virus in the United States, and four of his relatives have been quarantined in their homes as a precaution, health officials said Thursday.

For more details go here.

Because Walgreens does a variety of testing there is no stigma basically associated with coming here. You could be getting a cholesterol test or an HIV test - it’s the same clinic room for all of our testing and immunizations. It’s very private.
—  Washington D.C.-area Walgreens manager Bethany Kuechenmeister • Discussing the CDC’s new HIV-testing pilot program, which debuted in the Foggy Bottom location she manages last month, and the benefits that the program offers for those who worry about the social implications of getting tested. In honor of National HIV Testing Day, the company is offering free HIV tests, from 3pm-7pm until this Friday, at locations in 20 major cities across the country. source (viafollow)

BREAKING: First Diagnosed Case of Ebola in the U.S.

Reporting From CNN: A patient being treated at a Dallas, Texas, hospital is the first case of Ebola virus diagnosed in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday. Several other Americans were diagnosed in West Africa and then brought to the United States for treatment. The CDC is expected to provide more details on the case in a press conference at 5:30 p.m.

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What is Zika Virus?

Zika virus is spread to people through mosquito bites. The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

In May 2015, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) issued an alert regarding the first confirmed Zika virus infection in Brazil. The outbreak in Brazil led to reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome and pregnant women giving birth to babies with birth defects and poor pregnancy outcomes.

Read more about Zika Virus at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Infographic by VisualBest (Santosh Kushwaha)

It’s not the salt shakers on our tables that explain why Americans consume way too much sodium. It’s the processed foods we buy in grocery stores.

A new analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that 70 percent of the pizzas, pastas and meat dishes (think frozen entrees) we purchase in chain grocery stores exceed the Food and Drug Administration’s “healthy” labeling standards for salt. Americans also get a lot of sodium from soups, cold cuts and bread.

So, who’s getting the most salt from packaged foods?

Researchers had a hunch that shoppers in Southern states might be filling their carts with more salty foods. Their reasoning? The prevalence of high-blood pressure (aka hypertension) — which is linked to sodium consumption — is higher in the South. (And, hey, the South has a reputation for foods like fried chicken and salty biscuits.)

Sodium Sleuths: Do Southerners Eat More Salt Than The Rest Of Us?

Photos: iStockphoto; Deborah Austin/Flickr; Beckman’s Bakery/Flickr; iStockphoto; The Pizza Review/Flickr