Cast Iron Pans

Black Salt

Black Salt is used for cursing, protection, banishing, cleansing, breaking spells or hexes, and repelling negative energy. Black salt is made by combining either activated charcoal or ashes from burned herbs or incense with sea salt. 

Using activated charcoal will actually make your salt a dark black color, whereas using ashes will turn it into a lighter grey color. 

Depending on what you plan to use black salt for, you can add different types of ash or other ingredients that correspond with your intent.

Ashes from various herbs and incenses for black salt: 

  • Basil - banishing, protection, spell-breaking
  • Cedarwood - cleansing, protection
  • Cypress - protection
  • Dragon’s blood - cleansing, protection, cursing, banishing
  • Frankincense - cleansing, protection, spell-breaking
  • Mullein - protection (especially for acts of magick involving spirit work)
  • Rosemary - cleansing, banishing
  • Rue - banishing, cursing, protection, spell-breaking
  • Sage - cleansing, protection, banishing
  • Sandalwood - cleansing, protection
  • Thyme - cleansing, banishing
  • Tobacco - banishing, cursing
  • Valerian - protection
  • Wormwood - cursing, protection, spell-breaking

Other ingredients you can add to black salt: 

  • Black pepper - cleansing, banishing, cursing, protection
  • Cayenne pepper - banishing, cursing, protection
  • Chili powder - banishing, cursing, spell-breaking
  • Garlic salt - banishing, cleansing, spell-breaking
  • Iron shavings (like from the bottom of your cauldron or a cast-iron pot or pan) - protection
  • Nutmeg - protection, spell-breaking
  • Onion salt - banishing, spell-breaking

Making black salt: 

  • Combine the ingredients and grind together using a mortar and pestle, coffee grinder, or herb grinder

Using black salt:

  • Add to spell jars or sachets
  • Sprinkle in areas around your home to create a barrier
  • Create a circle of protection before performing spells
  • Keep a container of black salt under your bed or pillow to prevent nightmares or bad dreams
  • Add to a jar to create a Negativity Trap
  • If using skin-safe components and ingredients, make a facial scrub or mask for cleansing
  • Anoint objects with black salt
  • Add to a container of War Water (especially if your black salt contains iron shavings)
  • Sprinkle a small amount on a neighbor’s lawn to make them want to move
  • Add some to a hollow pendant and wear to deflect negativity 
  • Sprinkle on items that hold bad or negative memories to cleanse them
  • Add a line of black salt in front of doorways and windows to keep out negative energy and spirits or entities 
  • Add a pinch to homemade floor washes for cleansing
  • Use to symbolize the waning, new, and dark moon; or Saturn and Pluto
🌞💯🌡

About this sensitive content stuff… I requested a review from the Tumblr staff for at least ten posts in the last two weeks - got a response for one (not the first I reported), so this looks like a slow process (no wonder since more and more blogs get the undeserved NSFW tag lately, I don’t know what’s happening.)

Anyway, you don’t have to message me anymore about that; I’ll check it out in the app (since it’s not visible on the web ffs) now and then - and request reviews. Thank you for your help 😘


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snowbell55  asked:

Thanks so much! I really appreciate it (especially the College Student's Cookbook), but I'm not so much looking for recipes as I am the processes and what things do, ie, how to cut up a chicken into pieces, what paprika does, how to fry things, which knife to use when you want to do "x", the difference between sauteing and frying, etc. Not so much "what to put together if you want to make X" but "if you do this then this will happen because of that". Do you have any resources for that?

Whoops, sorry I didn’t understand. I don’t have any resources for that, so I threw one together for you! My boyfriend has been a line cook for about seven years now, and he’s taught me so much about food. There are lots of simple things you can do to make food taste better- but let’s start with the basics.

College Cooking 101

Materials

Here is a list of materials that I believe are absolutely necessary to creating a quality product. Feel free to substitute anything based on your own personal preferences.

Cooking supplies:

  • Non-stick frying pan (cast iron pans are much more difficult to clean)
  • Pot (I would recommend a small pot that you can use to cook for just yourself, and a larger pot for cooking portions or for company)
  • Lid for said pot
  • Rubber spatula (much better than wooden spoons)
  • Tongs
  • Sheet tray
  • Strainer
  • Scissors (kitchen scissors)
  • A cutting board (I recommend plastic because they’re easier to wash)
  • Cutting knife
  • Bread knife (both knives should be sharpened every six months at least, you can take them to your local kitchen supplies shop)

Spices:

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Dried chives (or real chives if you can swing them. Throw them in your ramen, your tuna salad, sprinkle them on top of pasta, etc)
  • Thyme (dried or fresh… dried is 3x as potent, use to season soups or pastas)
  • Rosemary (dried or fresh, use to season meats and starches)
  • Cumin (use this spice to rub meat)
  • Cinnamon
  • Sugar
  • Garlic powder or onion powder (used for meat rubs and seasoning soups or sauces)
  • Paprika (I would recommend avoiding smoked paprika, it’s got a super aggressive flavor… use this in small amounts sprinkled over things like you would the chives)

Basic produce:

  • Parmesan cheese (for sprinkling over pastas, you can get it pre-grated)
  • Cheddar cheese (for making sandwiches and mac and cheese)
  • Tomatoes (whole, crushed, paste, whatever… just have some sort of tomato product in your pantry at all times)
  • Potatoes (you can’t buy them pre-cut because the oxidize and turn gray if not used immediately… you can still eat them, but they don’t look pretty)
  • Onions (you can get them pre-cut)
  • Garlic (use to make sauce or soup bases)
  • Romaine hearts (lettuce has a short shelf life, but romaine hearts literally last forever and are healthier than eating iceberg lettuce)
  • Protein of some sort (whatever you like- steak, chicken, tofu, etc)
  • Something salty (like pickles, black olives, anchovies, etc)
  • Your favorite veggies (I like carrots and squashes the best)
  • Pasta (whatever is cheapest or on sale at your store)
  • Bread (freeze half a loaf and leave the rest in your fridge)
  • Eggs (egg beaters or whole eggs, whatever you like)
  • Butter (or a butter substitute)
  • Oil (olive oil is the most expensive)
  • Chicken stock (or vegetable stock, in a carton or cubed)


Techniques

Basic (super duper duper basic) instructions on how to cook various items. I am not a trained professional- the information I’m providing is based off of personal experience only.

Meat

  • Steak (skirt steak or cube steak are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside of the steak should be grey. The inside should be light pink.
    • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want.
    • Pair with: Starches or veggies.
  • Chicken (skinless and precut are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside should be white and dry.
    • Seasoning: Salt and pepper work best. You can also coat chicken in panko bread crumbs.
    • Pair with: Starches, veggies, fruits, or pasta.
  • Pork (pork chops are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with butter or oil. Outside should be starting to crisp. Inside should be the same color as the outside, and should feel very dry and hard.
    • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want. Meat should be completely coated in the spice rub, or it won’t taste like anything but the oil.
    • Pair with: Starches, veggies, or fruits.

Starches

  • Potatoes (little potatoes are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside fork tender.
    • Seasoning: Rub (literally rub the potatoes with your hands) salt, pepper, oil and rosemary all over the potatoes.
  • Pasta (shapes are easiest)
    • Cooking: Boil water with a teaspoon of salt. Wait until the water is visibly boiling to add your pasta. I like my pasta al dente, so I always cook it for the shortest amount of time listed on the box.
    • Seasoning: Thoroughly coat pasta with whatever sauce you’re using, or it will taste dry. Good prepared sauce brands: Newman’s Own, Classico, and Barilla.
  • Orzo/Cous Cous/Pastina
    • Cooking: Cook in chicken or vegetable stock following package instructions. Stir every so often, and add additional stock as it is absorbed into the pasta.
    • Seasoning: I like to add dried herbs to the sauce as it reduces to add flavor. You can also add veggies early on and let them cook in the sauce.

Veggies

  • Carrots/parsnips/beets (chopped are easiest)
    • Cooking: These can be pan fried in oil, boiled, cooked in a sauce/stew, or put on a sheet tray to roast in the oven. The easiest way to cook them is to add them to a sauce that you are heating up, and allow them to soften until they can be pierced by a fork.
    • Seasoning: Rub the veggies with salt before cooking, unless you are adding them to a sauce or stew.
  • Green beans/asparagus/brussels sprouts
    • Cooking: These are best pan fried with butter. Cook them until they are slightly crisped and fork tender. If you want to be fancy you can blanch them before hand. How to blanch: Boil water, and throw the veggies in for literally thirty seconds. Pour them into a strainer and douse them immediately with cold water from your sink tap until they are cool to the touch.
    • Seasoning: Salt works best before cooking. Butter after cooking.
  • Squash/eggplant/sweet potato (chopped are easiest)
    • Yes I know that sweet potato is a starch, but it fits better here.
    • Cooking: These veggies are best roasted until fork tender. Time varies. These veggies should be cooked with their skin left on.
    • Seasoning: Rub these veggies with salt and cook in a little oil. Top with butter after they are cooked.


Resources

- My Pasta Sauce Post. Click here.

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)


I hope this helps!

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for using seasonings when cooking? Or tips to help cook in general for some one new to it.

College Cooking 101

Materials

Here is a list of materials that I believe are absolutely necessary to creating a quality product. Feel free to substitute anything based on your own personal preferences.

Cooking supplies:

  • Non-stick frying pan (cast iron pans are much more difficult to clean)
  • Pot (I would recommend a small pot that you can use to cook for just yourself, and a larger pot for cooking portions or for company)
  • Lid for said pot
  • Rubber spatula (much better than wooden spoons)
  • Tongs
  • Sheet tray
  • Strainer
  • Scissors (kitchen scissors)
  • A cutting board (I recommend plastic because they’re easier to wash)
  • Cutting knife
  • Bread knife (both knives should be sharpened every six months at least, you can take them to your local kitchen supplies shop)

Spices:

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Dried chives (or real chives if you can swing them. Throw them in your ramen, your tuna salad, sprinkle them on top of pasta, etc)
  • Thyme (dried or fresh… dried is 3x as potent, use to season soups or pastas)
  • Rosemary (dried or fresh, use to season meats and starches)
  • Cumin (use this spice to rub meat)
  • Cinnamon
  • Sugar
  • Garlic powder or onion powder (used for meat rubs and seasoning soups or sauces)
  • Paprika (I would recommend avoiding smoked paprika, it’s got a super aggressive flavor… use this in small amounts sprinkled over things like you would the chives)

Basic produce:

  • Parmesan cheese (for sprinkling over pastas, you can get it pre-grated)
  • Cheddar cheese (for making sandwiches and mac and cheese)
  • Tomatoes (whole, crushed, paste, whatever… just have some sort of tomato product in your pantry at all times)
  • Potatoes (you can’t buy them pre-cut because the oxidize and turn gray if not used immediately… you can still eat them, but they don’t look pretty)
  • Onions (you can get them pre-cut)
  • Garlic (use to make sauce or soup bases)
  • Romaine hearts (lettuce has a short shelf life, but romaine hearts literally last forever and are healthier than eating iceberg lettuce)
  • Protein of some sort (whatever you like- steak, chicken, tofu, etc)
  • Something salty (like pickles, black olives, anchovies, etc)
  • Your favorite veggies (I like carrots and squashes the best)
  • Pasta (whatever is cheapest or on sale at your store)
  • Bread (freeze half a loaf and leave the rest in your fridge)
  • Eggs (egg beaters or whole eggs, whatever you like)
  • Butter (or a butter substitute)
  • Oil (olive oil is the most expensive)
  • Chicken stock (or vegetable stock, in a carton or cubed)

Techniques

Basic (super duper duper basic) instructions on how to cook various items. I am not a trained professional- the information I’m providing is based off of personal experience only.

Meat

  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside of the steak should be grey. The inside should be light pink.
  • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want.
  • Pair with: Starches or veggies.
  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside should be white and dry.
  • Seasoning: Salt and pepper work best. You can also coat chicken in panko bread crumbs.
  • Pair with: Starches, veggies, fruits, or pasta.
  • Cooking: Cook with butter or oil. Outside should be starting to crisp. Inside should be the same color as the outside, and should feel very dry and hard.
  • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want. Meat should be completely coated in the spice rub, or it won’t taste like anything but the oil.
  • Pair with: Starches, veggies, or fruits.

Starches

  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside fork tender.
  • Seasoning: Rub (literally rub the potatoes with your hands) salt, pepper, oil and rosemary all over the potatoes.
  • Cooking: Boil water with a teaspoon of salt. Wait until the water is visibly boiling to add your pasta. I like my pasta al dente, so I always cook it for the shortest amount of time listed on the box.
  • Seasoning: Thoroughly coat pasta with whatever sauce you’re using, or it will taste dry. Good prepared sauce brands: Newman’s Own, Classico, and Barilla.
  • Cooking: Cook in chicken or vegetable stock following package instructions. Stir every so often, and add additional stock as it is absorbed into the pasta.
  • Seasoning: I like to add dried herbs to the sauce as it reduces to add flavor. You can also add veggies early on and let them cook in the sauce.

Veggies

  • Cooking: These can be pan fried in oil, boiled, cooked in a sauce/stew, or put on a sheet tray to roast in the oven. The easiest way to cook them is to add them to a sauce that you are heating up, and allow them to soften until they can be pierced by a fork.
  • Seasoning: Rub the veggies with salt before cooking, unless you are adding them to a sauce or stew.
  • Cooking: These are best pan fried with butter. Cook them until they are slightly crisped and fork tender. If you want to be fancy you can blanch them before hand. How to blanch: Boil water, and throw the veggies in for literally thirty seconds. Pour them into a strainer and douse them immediately with cold water from your sink tap until they are cool to the touch.
  • Seasoning: Salt works best before cooking. Butter after cooking.
  • Yes I know that sweet potato is a starch, but it fits better here.
  • Cooking: These veggies are best roasted until fork tender. Time varies. These veggies should be cooked with their skin left on.
  • Seasoning: Rub these veggies with salt and cook in a little oil. Top with butter after they are cooked.

Resources

- My Pasta Sauce Post. Click here.

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)

I hope this helps!

The Importance of Iron in Witchcraft

So, I got a lot of really positive feedback about my post about salt in witchcraft, so here’s another one just for you about iron!

Iron, like salt, has been used for many thousands of years as a potent tool in the practices of witchcraft. Iron is one of the most abundant metals in our planet, and is also a really great metal for making into tools. It’s tough, hard, ductile and with a high melting point that makes it ideal for situations in which you might need a tool to work under extremely hot conditions. It’s also one of only three ferromagnetic metals (along with nickel and cobalt), making it an essential part of most magnets and compasses.

In astrophysics, iron is extremely important in the life cycle of stars. Iron is one of the most atomically stable substances in the universe, and it’s also unique because it’s the first element in the periodic table to require more energy to MAKE it than it gives out from atomic fusion. This is important, because when a star gets older and fuses hydrogen to make helium, helium to make beryllium and all the rest, once it starts fusing atoms to make iron, the star begins to die. So, iron is an element that signals the death of stars, and any element that weighs MORE than iron (atomically speaking) can only be made in supernovas - that is, the explosion that takes place when a really BIG star dies.

In biology, iron is one of the most important elements in mammalian, reptilian and avian blood, because it’s the element that we use in the chemical haemoglobin. This is the chemical in our blood cells that binds to oxygen and keeps us alive. Crustaceans like lobsters don’t use iron - they use copper, and instead make haemocyanin, which makes their blood blue! However, just like in stars, iron can mean death for humans as well. If we overdose on iron, we suffer from iron heavy metal poisoning; when we get crushed by a heavy object we can suffer a disease called traumatic rhabdomyolysis or Crush Syndrome, caused by vast amounts of myoglobin (another iron-based compound, found in muscles, which gives them extra oxygen to use) entering our kidneys and killing them, and as a result killing us.

Iron in science is an element of life, death, and of many points in between. But what about its uses in witchcraft?

Witchy Facts about Iron!

  1. Iron is stable. Iron’s stability, both atomically and magickally, makes it a fantastic magickal conductor, and also means that magick doesn’t seem to affect iron very much. Enchantments on iron are never as strong as on other metals, and even the best witches will have difficulty making an enchantment or other spell anchor properly. However, this has the advantage that iron doesn’t pick up negative magick from background sources, and it’s extremely unlikely that there will be issues with ritual or altar tools made from iron. Keeping your magickal supplies inside an iron or steel box, or a box that’s been nailed together with iron nails, will prevent them from leaking out and attracting spirits that might cause harm.

  2. Iron is protective. Along with silver and a few other little bits and bobs, negative spirits and fae folk cannot touch iron lest it burn them and cause them pain. Additionally, negative magicks targetted at someone wearing an iron pendant will be attracted into the pendant and then dispelled. This makes it an ideal protective charm for everyday carry or everyday wear.

    This is why horseshoes are considered lucky
    - back in Medieval times, when protection against negative spirits and magick was much more widely practiced, poor families would often be unable to afford much iron. However, a horseshoe is made of iron, and comes with holes already cast into it, which allow you to nail one over your door easily, which keeps out harmful spirits, magick, and fae, who might seek to hurt you or your family.

  3. Iron is inconspicuous. Anyone can carry an iron nail after all, and a little piece of iron wrought and twisted into a small pendant is far from a traditional witch’s item. Those secret witches who perhaps do not live with accepting families or within an accepting community or country can find great solace in the use of iron as a protective charm.

  4. Iron is cheap. Iron nails, iron rods and iron knifes are pretty easy to get hold of and relatively quite cheap. They’re versatile and not especially likely to draw attention to you - after all, nobody’s likely to question why someone has a couple of iron nails twisted into a pendant, and if they do question it, why it’s just an artistic display! And of course, easy to replace with $5 worth of string, iron and a hammer.

  5. Iron is ancient. Iron is one of the oldest protective charms out there, right up with salt and sage. It’s been used for literally thousands of years to protect people against everything from wolves to armies to poltergeists. That’s a pretty impressive history!

  6. Iron is practical! The best cookware I’ve ever used has always been my cast iron cookware set, which makes better food than I’ve ever tasted, and it’s very easy to clean. It’s also extremely hardwearing - I wholly expect to one day be able to pass on my cast iron frying pan and wok to my grandchildren, and it was already been owned by my mother and father before me. Iron knifes are sharper and cut cleaner than almost anything except obsidian, and high-carbon steel (an alloy of iron and carbon) is the best cutting edge known in bushcrafting circles, where all the best knives are made from it

I hope this helps all you lovely witches and magick users out there!

– Juniper

too-music  asked:

Funniest thing ever about emotional abusive parent(s) is when they try to buy gifts and such for you. Like that totally makes up for you being a control freak about my life for some many years.

This is why to this day my mother sends me frying pans in the mail. 

No I’m not kidding. She mails me kitchenware at random, she mails me expensive dresses (usually about 2 sizes too small so when I say to her that it doesn’t fit she is able to make a comment about how I must have gotten fat/let myself go since I left her care which HAhaha 🖕) and little notes that say “miss you baby, come home soon xxx” and while I am always very very careful to tell her thank you and mail her a thank you card, if I don’t sound suitably awed by her (baffling, I mean who the fuck mails a cast iron pan over the ocean???) overwhelming generosity, you can bet your last dollar that I’ll get a phone call the following day telling me I’m an ingrate and I take advantage and how neglected she is and how I don’t love them anymore and blah, blah, blah, blahblahblahblah.

And it’s worse because people who don’t know the situation genuinely just think you’re a meanhearted mother fucker because you’re not gushing over things. Like “wow I wish my mother would send me these things, why are you not more grateful” like yes well Susan, I might be able to enjoy these things if they didn’t come with the unspoken price tag of unconditional forgiveness and a heaping side dish of emotional bullshit, but here we are.

9

Baked Chicken & Zucchini Rigatoni

Ingredients

1 box (1 lb) rigatoni noodles

1 lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized pieces

1 large zucchini, cut into bite-sized cubes

Seasoning blend (for both chicken and zucchini) - ½ tbsp Herbs de Provence, ½ tbsp dried basil, ½ tbsp dried oregano, 1 tsp lemon granules, 1 tsp smoked paprika, 1 tsp kosher salt, 1 tsp ground black pepper, 2 tsp granulated onion, 2 tsp granulated garlic, and a pinch of red pepper flakes.

2 cups pasta sauce of your choice

Olive oil

1 - 1 ½ cups cheese of your choice (I used parmesan)

Directions

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and cook your rigatoni noodles so that they are 2 minutes from being cooked to al dente.

In two small bowls, toss your chicken and your zucchini with olive oil and the seasoning blend

In a pan/skillet, heat a tbsp or two of olive oil over medium heat.

Cook the chicken thighs over medium heat until they are fully cooked.

Remove from pan into a large bowl.

Par-cook/soften the zucchini in a tbsp of olive oil.

Remove from pan into the same large bowl.

Once the pasta is 2 minutes from being al dente, drain and rinse under cold water.

In the same large bowl, combine the pasta with the chicken and zucchini and incorporate the sauce.

NOTE: Use as much or as little sauce as you would like.

In a baking dish or cast iron pan, layer the pasta, layer the cheese, layer the pasta, and finish with a layer of cheese.

Allow the pasta to bake for about 10 minutes at 400 degrees and in the last minute or two, turn your broiler on high and allow the cheese to completely melt.

Remove from oven and let cool for a few minutes before serving.

Garnish with fresh parsley and serve.

Enjoy!

cassonade-en-morceaux  asked:

Elsewhere U promp: Someone's room mate get spirited away on purpose and don't come back (insert your depressing why reason here). The remaining room mate know the why and when. Now they have to deal with the fae who took their buddy's place. At first it's awkward AF but the human room mate want to get the best out of it so they slowly adapt their dorm for the fae. Silver jewelry looked, no iron in the kitchen (or just one for emergency), red apple for the fae to snack on. Basic civilities -1/?

But they never talk about it ‘cause you just don’t. The fae think the human is going to ask for a favor but it never came. A full trimester go on like this until during a conversation the fae “don’t lie” and the human goes “dude that one was a very twisted truth and you know it”. Silence. As the human wait for the worst, the fae simply go “why ?” and the human just say they didn’t want to be a dick to them. You shouldn’t be a dick to your roommate. At this point they build a silence trust. -2/3            

honestly the more i think about this whole world the more i want unlikely friendships between students and weird weird changelings. the cast-iron frying pan is for the food that you Really Don’t Want Stolen. the movie posters are joined by a lot of amateur pictures of trees and a tangle of string lights that make everyone else in the dorm refuse to visit your room.

Also props for the most low-key way to call them out ever, that’s fantastic

(I’ve been looking for 3/3 and can’t find it!!! did it get sent?)

little silly domestic promnis things 

  • taking baths together, complete with back scrubs and hair washing. prompto always blowing bubbles at ignis
  • cooking together, ignis always managing to saddle up behind prompto – head over shoulder, arms circling around to show him how to chop and dice properly 
  • speaking of cooking, ignis halting prompto’s fluttering around to make him taste whatever he’s making ( “ don’t say it needs more salt, i’ve added enough.”  “… um. ” “it needs more salt, doesn’t it?” “ you told me not to say that !” )
  • falling asleep together on the couch. prompto constantly promising that he’s going to stay awake for the entire show/movie but he never does, especially when ignis cards his fingers through his hair
  • mornings spent drinking coffee ( ignis taking his black, prompto taking his with extra cream and three spoons of sugar ) and reading the paper - after ignis’s blinding, prompto picks out sections of interest and reads them aloud to him   
  • going home-goods shopping and prompto wanting to buy more throw pillows that is feasibly reasonable for one man to own ( also having to drag ignis away from the the new sets of cast iron pans ) 
  • speaking of home goods, bickering over why they do or do not need a lava lamp ( “ but it’s neat !”  “ prompto, if we’re getting that then we’re getting the pinch bowls we saw earlier.” “you already have a set!” “ true, but not in black.” )
  • spending a lazy evening ordering out and eating on paper plates ( ignis more aghast that they actually own paper plates rather than the take-out actually being decent )
  • prompto finding out rather early on that ignis may or may not be a bedcover hog, which only enables him to be the big spoon when they sleep. 
  • hand holding during grocery shopping. that’s it.  ( prompto also managing to convince ignis that yes, they do need all those different flavors of cream cheese ). 
Kiss Me

Featuring: Monster Woo

Genre: Fluff

23 .  “ᴡʜᴀᴛ’ꜱ ᴄᴏᴏᴋɪɴ’ ɢᴏᴏᴅ ʟᴏᴏᴋɪɴ’?”   27. “ᴋɪꜱꜱ ᴍᴇ.”


“What’s cookin’ good lookin’?”

You gasped and placed a hand over your heart, startled by a new presence when you assumed you were home alone,“Ah! Youngwoo you scared me.”

He gave you a cheeky smile, “So what’s in the pan?” he wondered as he looked over your shoulder towards the cast iron pan.

“Dak Galbi, are you hungry?”

“When aren’t I?”

“True, I should ask the opposite question. How was your day?” You asked as you continued to add ingredients to the stir fry.

“Pretty good we got most of the new choreography down for Dynamic Duo’s new music video, tomorrow we can probably finish everything and teach the rest of the dancers.”

“That’s great! Now hopefully I get to see you around more often after you guys wrap up filming and all,” you said enthusiastically as you looked back at him and smiled his way.

“Yeah.” He chuckled.

“Why are you laughing?”

“Nothing.” he fibbed as he tried to hold back his laughter.

You put down your spoon on the counter and faced him, “Tell me or I’m gonna be upset.”

He shook his head ‘no’, you playfully slapped his arm, “Tell me.”

“Remember the time I tried to show you how to dance?” he asked before he burst in laughter. You hit his arm once again but this time a bit harsher, you scoffed at him and turned around and continued to stir the stir fry. “And here I thought you actually wanted to get feed.”   

“Aw, come on babe it was funny.”

“No, it was embarrassing. We agreed that that  would never be spoken of again.”  

He wrapped his arms around your waist and nuzzled his face into the crook of your neck, “Come on baby,  don’t be upset. It wasn’t that bad and you insisted on me telling you.”

“Well you shouldn’t have thought about it.” you rebutted as you ignored his advances.

He kissed your earlobe and tugged on it slightly between his lips.

“Cut it out.” You insisted on sulking.

“I know you’re not even mad at me.” He taunted.

“Yes, I am.”

“Turn around and look at me.” He ordered.

You did as told and looked him in the eyes as he grinned, he leaned in closely your nose tips almost touching.

“Kiss Me.” he ordered in a teasing tone as he looked at your lips with mischief.

Despite his large build and his tattoo covered body Monster Woo was nothing more than a  big cuddle Monster and when he started acting up like this you just couldn’t resist… you leaned in gave him a quick peck and quickly turned around before Youngwoo could continue to tease you.


I think we can all agree Monster Woo looks like he could kill you but is actually a cinnamon roll, or just maybe he can accidentally kill you *shrugs* we’ll never know…