Career-Fair

anonymous asked:

They have a career fair at school. The little lads dressing as doctors and firefighters, and staying far away from the cops

Jeremy dresses like a lawyer. Gavin is a doctor. Michael starts out as a firefighter, but he keeps scowling at the cops. So he talks Kerry into trading costumes with him and he comes sprinting out as a cop and just spend the entire time making fun of the LSPD. They think he’s kidding; he’s not.

Potter. Am I to assume you are here for our beginner class, or is this an official visit?“

“Official…?” Potter blinked at him and then shook his head. “Oh. No! I’m not an Auror anymore. I’m here for the class. You’re actually teaching a photography class? I didn’t know you could… I mean, I didn’t know.”

“What you don’t know about me could fill Battelle’s World Wizarding Museum in Manchester six times over,” Draco said dryly.

Potter frowned. “There is a World Wizarding Museum?
Things I learned in my first year of college

This is more for my reference than anything else, but if you find this info helpful then cool. The ones with *** are the one I found most important or didn’t find on the internet when I was looking for tips. 

  • ***Your feet will hurt from walking around so much. Don’t bother getting new shoes to cope because by the time you break those in you’ll be used to walking around. Save that money for food. 
  • ***Go to career fair. You’ll probably not get the internship or job your first year, but at least you’ll know how to dress yourself, research companies, and present yourself. 
  • Go to club meeting where a company rep is present. Company reps have insane memory. They’ll remember you. Especially if you go see them every time. Helpful for when you’re applying.
  • Get a foam mattress topper
  • Don’t have a crush. You’ll waste so much time thinking about it it’s not even funny. 
  • Make friends. Make connections. Have fun. Get lit (safely).
  • Always plan your safe ride home or you’ll spend $56.50 on an uber at 3 am. 
  • Use the free bus rides you get with your tuition. 
  • Always ask for student discounts. 
  • ***Don’t just do academics. Having a 4.0 is cool and all, but no company or grad school wants you if that’s the ONLY thing you did. 
  • ***Be busy. When you’re busy, you manage your time better and be more productive instead of procrastinating because “oh that test is in like a week and I have nothing to do besides that so I’ll do it later.” 
  • ***Know your limits. You can’t handle being actively involved in 5 clubs and school. You’ll kill yourself in the process. Limit yourself to 3 clubs because it only gets harder from here.
  • Join clubs. Find something besides just academics that peaks your interests. It’ll make you a better student and expand your views. 
    • Join one fun club like a sorority and one serious club like business council. 
  • Work out. You’ll gain weight if you don’t. Set a routine in the summer so you can follow during the year when things get busy. 
  • Be safe. Let’s be real, it’s college and there’s drugs and alcohol everywhere. If you choose to do it, be safe about it. Here’s some safety tips. 
    • Always use a condom. Get them free from your university health center. 
    • If you’re gonna drink for the first time, do it at home or somewhere that you are comfortable and know 
    • If you’re gonna do drugs, again do it at home or a safe environment 
    • Don’t ever leave your open drink unattended. Get a new one if you do. 
    • You know when someone is sleazy or creepy. Stay away. If they’re persistent, give a fake name or number, get some random girls to let you (Oh jessica we’re leaving lets go), or straight up get away 
    • Never go somewhere alone at night. Even if you have pepper spray. 
  • Visit your family at least twice a semester if you can. They miss you and do a lot for you. Go visit them. I visited mine once a month because empty nest syndrome is real. 
  • Don’t study where your friends are. You’ll get distracted because when it’s 3 am and your getting sick of studying, procrastinating with friends seems super fun. 
  • ***Study with a group. Sounds counter intuitive considering my last tip, but for things like ochem, engineering classes, business projects, or whatever, the classes are designed that if you don’t work in groups you will fail. Find a group of people/friends that are actually productive for studying and stick with it. Form a study squad. Join with other squads from time to time. 
  • Don’t eat out a lot. You’ll get fat and broke.
  • Drink lots of water. Refillable water bottles ftw. 
  • Get off your phone in class. No you can’t pay attention and listen at the same time. 
  • Email your professors. Go to extra review sessions. When you’re .04 off from getting an A this will help you. 
  • ***ONLY go to TA sessions if they grade the work and/or actually help you learn. Some TA’s are garbage because they’re required to do it for grad school. But they grade your stuff and if you’re one the few people who’s name they know, that’ll definitely help you. If you learn nothing from them and they don’t grade your stuff, don’t waste your time. 
  • Sleep. That all nighter is worse for you than not knowing anything. Cram the best you can and at least get 3 hours. 
  • Save your notes. You’ll never know when you’ll need it, if your friend needs it, or sell it. 
  • ***Use a notebook. Don’t write notes on loose leaf paper. You’ll lose track of it. If you take notes on a laptop, use onenote or something idk I have math and science notes, I can’t take that on a laptop. 
  • If you’re business or something along the line of that, look nice to class. Everyone else is too. Don’t have a professor notice you for your scrubbiness. Comb your hair, throw on some mascara, and wear whatever makes you feel good to class. 
  • ***If you’re stem or something like that, don’t worry to much about looking nice. Unlike business, the professor is probably dressed scrubbier than you. If you look nice, cool, you’ll get noticed for not being scrubby like everyone else. 
  • ***Have desk space. You’re gonna have your laptop, a million papers, and studying utensils out. Have the space for it so you don’t go crazy trying to look for stuff. 
  • ***Have a planner. The most important one. Whether it is hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, or whatever, have one. You have a lot of stuff to do, and you can’t remember it all. Buy one, print one, use google calender, doesn’t matter just have it.

This might not work for everyone, because some of you are these highly motivated studious students that has their life together, which is awesome please teach me your ways, but if you’re a mess like me, these are some tips I wish I found on a studyblr or college tips. 

H/D Career Fair 2017

H/D Career Fair is Back! This is the fourth time H/D Career Fair will be running!

(banner by Heathen)

The following professions are not allowed in this year’s H/D Career Fair:
Harry: Auror, Professor, Healer, Curse-breaker, Quidditch Player
Draco: Auror, Professor, Healer, Unspeakable, Potions Master

Fest Timeline:
Prompting: June 5 (Draco’s birthday) – June 19
Claiming: June 24 – July 14
Submissions due: September 9
Posting starts: October 1
Big Reveal: November 4

Check out our previous fair here!

We’ll post more detailed Rules & Guidelines this Sunday.

vimeo

my updated demo reel is here! check it out if you wanna see some of the neat stuff i’ve been working on lately c:

so i finished my first year of college last month and thought i’d share things i learned and advice on entering and starting your first year 

  • keep a planner
  • take advantage of student id discounts
  • try to go to class as much as possible
  • in cases that you don’t go, make sure you have a friend, or at least someone who will fill you in and give you notes, in each class
  • network as soon as you can and as often as you can
  • wait a week or two until you purchase your textbooks, people aren’t lying to you, they’re expensive as fuuuccckkk, you’ll want to wait for multiple reasons because in some cases you never even end up using the book, or your library has it and you can just borrow it for free
  • wear flip flops in the shower if you don’t have your own bathroom
  • speaking of, go to the bathroom before class
  • set multiple alarms
  • take advantage of as many opportunities that come your way as possible
  • MAKE CONNECTIONS
  • have a very, very open mind
  • watch your drink
  • watch your friend’s drinks too
  • never, ever, ever, ever, ever, under ANY circumstances, drive while intoxicated or get into a car with a driver who is 
  • get to know your professors
  • do the extra credit, it’s rare
  • back up your files
  • if you take your laptop with you somewhere bring your charger as well
  • take the stairs, seriously, a little goes a long way
  • 99.9999% of people don’t give a shit about what you were in high school
  • try to plan and work ahead
  • never travel alone late at night
  • don’t hesitate to ask for help—material that took a week to learn in high school can be taught in one lecture in a college class, no one will slow down for you or help you unless you speak up
  • participate in class
  • again, talk to your professors, it’s good to in general, and you never know how they can help you outside of class
  • if you have a problem with your roommate, if you’re not getting along with them, or it’s not working, do something about it ASAP
  • keep in touch with those you care about, don’t burn bridges
  • it’s ok if you don’t make friends immediately, it took me awhile to find people i could truly be satisfied with, sometimes it happens when you’re not looking
  • take this to heart: do things you wouldn’t ordinarily do before. the best things i did this past school year were things i never tried in high school, going on trips with people i didn’t know, who i now call some of the closest friends i have, and going on service work trips out of state
  • build up your gpa in the beginning by taking classes that are not as tough in your first semester, a gpa is harder to bring up than to knock down, tldr; start strong, start easy
  • grades matter, BUT, don’t sacrifice your health and well being for them
  • get enough sleep, you can, i did
  • don’t base your decisions off what other people would think but if something goes against your morals, stick with your morals
  • take care of yourself and your body, just because it’s free does not mean you have to eat it, college is the perfect time to make your physical health crash and burn but it is also the perfect time to start having a healthier one
  • take the time to check over assignments you’re submitting
  • ratemyprofessor.com is your bff, use it and reference it
  • sign up for a variety of activities and test out the water to see what you like most
  • early classes are not that bad
  • attend campus events
  • know what’s going on on campus, don’t be clueless in your own environment
  • get involved in clubs and groups that are associated with your major…but also stuff that isn’t
  • and if a group/organization that’s associated with your major, like for me PRSSA, has a membership fee, it’s probably worth it
  • explore your city, campus, downtown….
  • try to get an internship before it’s required
  • get a LinkedIn account
  • always keep an umbrella and a phone charger on hand
  • make friends with as many people as you can, but don’t “collect” friends, ya know?
  • go to job fairs/career fairs
  • it’s ok to stay in sometimes and just j chill
  • decorate and personalize your room
  • when preparing to register for classes, make a mock schedule first
  • find a mentor(s)
  • first impressions are a big fucking deal
  • you don’t have to put on a ball gown, but put an effort into the way you represent yourself
  • make a budget 
It’s not… I don’t mind it, being on my own. I have my—“

“Yes.” Harry had his, too. Ghosts and plants and job and friends.

“But I wouldn’t mind this, either,” Malfoy said. “At times it can get…”

A little lonely, Harry thought. I know. “So it might be good.”

“And if it’s not?”

“We revert to childish hexes, of course.
Things learned about the SCAD Career Fair from the eyes of a student volunteer.

Have a Demo Reel.

Don’t wait in line with friends.

Invest in a suit.

Don’t show any PDA, it’s very unprofessional.

Have a satchel or a small bag, don’t have a large back back, and especially don’t use a plastic bag (believe me, I saw one).

Make appointments ASAP.

Bring food.

Bring headphones.

Stay fit, you will be standing for hours.

Wear comfortable shoes.

Don’t party the night before.

Bring an Ipad or a Laptop.

Find a way to stand out.

Know all computer programs.

Know what the company is offering and what you want from them.

Don’t sell yourself short.

Don’t walk with swagger, walk with confidence.

Join Facebook groups, it’ll get your name out there.

When turning in a resume and business card, use paperclips!

Get some good paper for your resumes, don’t use cheap printer paper.

Have an interesting way to present your work, keep it classy.

Keep good posture.

Don’t chew gum.

Bring a water bottle.

Do it your Junior year first.  Come back Senior year and revisit the same companies.

Don’t use too many hand gestures.

Make sure your hands aren’t too full.

Show work relevant to your major.

Make sure your clothes fit, don’t wear anything that’s too baggy.

SMILE!

Write your name and major fairly large on your name tag. Make it legible!

No tee shirts of any kind!

No denim!

Have knowledge of traditional and digital mediums, not just one or the other.

Have more than enough resumes and business cards.

Seriously guys, listen to these tips.

engineering school gothic
  • you are in three classes that use bernoulli’s equation. none of the equations are the same. your teachers do not know who bernoulli is. did bernoulli even exist?
  • there is a problem set. it is not on the syllabus. the first question is a blank page. you look through the whole set. it is all blank, except for the last page. you think it says “run”. you do not know. it is not written in binary.
  • this is an ethics class. you are not sure why you are here. you do not need ethics. you have never needed ethics. “it’s a joke class,” whispers an upperclassman. you do not understand why it is funny.
  • abet. the name echoes through the halls of the mechanical engineering building. no one knows what it means.
  • you are studying the tacoma narrows bridge for the fifth time. your differential equations professor tells you it is not an example of resonance. your engineering professor tells you it is. you are not sure who to trust.
  • there are six bernoullis. only four of them are related. they all look the same.
  • the environmental science majors have to take a class to learn excel. you do not understand. you have always known excel, haven’t you? you do not remember learning it.
  • you solve a triple integral and stop, confused. it has become a ricotti equation. you have forgotten ohm’s law.
  • euler has done everything. there is a portrait of euler in the english building. when you look into its eyes, something disturbs you on a visceral level.
  • you know so many languages: java, javascript, doubt, python, c++, R, matlab, uncertainty, ruby, html, confusion, terror,
  • your professor cancels class. you suspect a trick. when you arrive to the classroom, your entire class is there, watching the empty space where the professor should be. no one speaks. no one leaves.
  • the problem set is optional. the problem set is not optional. the problem set is about schrodinger’s law.
  • three different people have explained mechatronics to you. nobody knows what it is.
  • your friend says they have essays to write. essays? you cannot remember what a word document looks like. you have not written a paragraph in two years. words are abstract concepts without meaning.
  • “you’re an engineer?” someone asks. “you must be smart.” you begin to laugh. you have them all fooled. you cannot stop laughing.
  • no one is sure what systems engineering is. the lights in the systems building are always on. you have never seen someone come out.
  • your professors all do research. there are bloodstains on their lecture notes. you do not ask what they research. the last person to ask vanished at the start of the semester. your computer science professor hasn’t stopped smiling since.
  • when you attend career fairs, you are surrounded by students you have never seen and companies you have never heard of. “we’re an innovative start-up,” someone says. “we’re an innovative start-up,” you hear echoed down the hall three weeks later. the words have not stopped. you cannot sleep. you are an innovative start-up. 
A-Level Advice From A Newbie

So I’m (almost) done with my final AS exams, and having at last completed my first year of college, I feel like I’ve picked up on a lot. I know that there are a LOT of GCSE students on here - particularly in Years 10/11 - who are planning to start their AS Levels in September, so I thought I’d make a post of things I’ve learned (both through success and a lot of failure) that might be helpful!

1. MAKE SURE THAT YOU KNOW WHAT YOU’RE SIGNING UP FOR

This definitely sounds pretty basic, but you would not believe the amount of people who either switch their subjects around or drop A Levels entirely within the first month or so. As much as the change is definitely okay and it’s great to switch to what works for you, if you make these changes after a week or two, you’re going to have a LOT of work to catch up on regardless of what course or subject you move to. In regards to A Levels as a whole, here are some aspects that could be helpful to consider based on how you work:

  • AS moves fast; content is covered extremely quickly and although you’ll be eased in gently, you’re expected to keep up.
  • There’s a lot of content. I struggled more revising three AS subjects than 11 GCSEs.
  • They’re very academic; although some subjects have coursework, a lot of this is written (essays, investigations, etc), and there’s a big reliance on exams.
  • It’s much stricter on homework. In my college, if we don’t keep up with work, there’s a pretty high chance we can be kicked off the course.

In terms of individual subjects, I feel like there’s a big misconception that all of your subjects should relate to one another, which isn’t true at all! If you have a specific career plan in mind, sometimes similar subjects can be helpful (for example I know people taking chemsitry/physics/biology or drama/media/film), but having a backup plan is always nice! A couple of things to consider with subject choice are:

  • How will you be assessed? This is a pretty important one; if you don’t like writing, but take three subjects which evaluate you on your essay writing ability, you’re going to struggle.
  • What’s the content of the course? You may think a subject sounds great, but not the actual curriculum and topics!
  • Do you like the teacher? This is an iffy one, but if you meet the teacher and absolutely 1000% can’t get along with them, it’s going to damage your motivation. Just make sure you can tolerate their class.

2. USE  A L L  OF YOUR INDEPENDENT STUDY TIME

I am telling you now that you will be told this by every single adult you meet in college. every. single. one. And you’ll probably argue that you don’t have enough work to fill all of the time, or that you’re too tired, or, you know, something that seems reasonable at the time but regrettable three months later.

At my college, we’re expected to put in five hours of study per subject per week, not including homework or in-class time. For most people, this’ll mean around 15 hours a week, which doesn’t seem much, but whEN YOU DON’T USE IT, IT IS SO MUCH TIME LOST. I don’t know anybody who puts in 15hrs/week, but now that it’s exam season we’re all regretting it real hard.

Get your homework done, and find a way to revise your work. Flashcards. Posters. Past papers. If you don’t have any new content to learn, put in the time every week to study the stuff you do have, and I promise you it will pay off.

3. BE NICE TO YOUR TEACHERS

Honestly this shouldn’t even have to be something that I have to remind people, but here we are.

In sixth form and particularly college, there’s much less of a power imbalance between students and teachers than there is in school; we’re on the same grounds, we’re both pretty independent, and we’re both there doing what we’re doing because we want to be. So have some respect.

A lot of the time at colleges, teachers have actually had experience in the field that they’re teaching and they’re so genuinely excited about the topics; one of the best things I’ve found at my college is how enthusiastic the teachers are, and how much interest they have in anything you have to say, especially if it’s relevant to the subject.

Also, when you show respect to teachers, they show respect to you. Many a time I’ve been given a short but extended deadline on a piece of work just because I’ve dropped a teacher an email or spoken to them before/after class, and in the words of one teacher, ‘the fact that you’re concerned enough to ask is enough proof that you’re putting effort in’.

But yeah. Talk to your teachers. Let them know if you’re missing a class. They’re human beings; don’t be a dick.

4. GO TO ALL VISITS / EVENTS / WORK EXPERIENCE

Not all places do a lot of these, but I know my college has done a few bits. What I mean by this is things such as higher education/career fairs, work exploration,  and visits from people in specific careers. Even if you think that it isn’t relevant to you at all, you could learn or come across something that could be beneficial or helpful to your future, a qualification, or even just enjoy an hour or so.

I did an afternoon at the StonePillow Homeless Shelter in my town; I didn’t change my mind about my career, I didn’t gain any qualifications from it, but I definitely found it interesting and it certainly had an impact on my worldview.

On the same note, join a club. Not only is this something which can be later used on CVs and personal statements, but you can learn a lot of skills which can help you in your actual subjects.

5. REMEMBER THAT YOU ARE NOT SUPERIOR

Not exactly a tip, but something that I really think A Level students need to keep in mind.

There’s a big thing that I keep seeing of A Level students joking about being better than people doing other courses (BTEC, apprenticeships, vocational, etc), and it’s not true at all. Everybody is working equally hard to get the qualifications that THEY need to get to where THEY want to go.

If you’re thinking like this, just stop.



I really hope this was helpful to anybody considering A Levels - best of luck to anybody currently sitting exams!

10.04.17 April!

1. what do you have going on this month?

I really like the prompts in @littlestudyblrblog​‘s april study challenge, so I’ll be doing a few of them even though I’m starting on a different day! 

I finished my internal rotation (thank god), have a work dinner, and a careers fair! Then I’ll be observing ophthalmologists do eye surgery! :D do you like my molang sticker? i thought it was fitting :3


MY STUDY TIPS

Please see my #optomstudies tag or my study tips directory (web only) for the full list of study tips + see my kpop vocab lists + stationery + bujo spreads! ^_^

WHAT I WISH I’D KNOWN BEFORE UNIVERSITY STUDY TIPS SERIES
0 Choosing a Degree , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10-1 , 10-2 Saving Money 11 Adapting to Uni Study , 12 Study From Textbooks in Uni new

10 Things They Don’t Tell You about Finding Your First Teaching Position

Congratulations on graduating you teacher/educator! Wrapping up your student teaching and walking across that stage is a validation of four long years of work. Now all that’s left is to find your first teaching job.

1.) You will not have a job in May. Breathe.

Especially if you’re not math, science, or SPED expect not to have a job in May. This can be an incredibly scary and daunting position to be headed towards, but it is also completely normal. Schools do not even start thinking about the next school year until late June/early July. This isn’t to say you shouldn’t even start your search until then, but don’t panic until August 1st. Perhaps you’re a self-driven “go-getter” who just knows in your heart you’re going to be one of the few with a job. That’s great, be determined, but know that the system you’re headed towards does not really reward go-getters, and often you’ll feel like you’re constantly speeding up to a red light. The people who are graduating with a job are either: student teaching at a school that has an opening, their CT is head of the department, or they return to the high school they themselves attended. There is nothing wrong with using connections, but if you’re not in the one of the above three categories, it is a tough process to get your foot in the door. Thousands of teachers just like you go through this process every year. Breathe, and you will be fine.

2.) There will be peaks and valleys

There will be days that you are nailing it; there will be days where you are wallowing in self-pity on the carpet blubbering about how you’re un-hirable (and maybe un-lovable) and should crawl under a rock and die. As with any job search, the journey is a long one and is filled with peaks and valleys. This is something that your education prep courses notoriously under-prepared you for. To start with, they do not give you a real scope of just how much time the search itself is going to take you and the courses, (no matter how many resume building classes you attend) can’t prepare you for how personal it feels when you never get a call back, or a reply email. The valleys are so long and so deep and the peaks are so short that you may accidentally trip over one on the way to another valley. You present the best version of yourself for so long and seem to still face rejection at every corner. There will be days where you get that email or a principal will leave a voicemail and you will feel as if you have vanquished a monster every time. Those are glorious times in the kingdom. Know this: it is not personal, there is nothing wrong with you, keep up the good fight.

3.) Take Sundays for you

Obviously being determined is important and you want to start early and have your application materials (resume, letters of rec…etc) as soon as you can get them together. However, nothing ever gets accomplished on a Sunday. It’s rare for any principals to be in their office, district offices certainly aren’t open, and everything shuts down on a Sunday. In the mad, stressful search that is finding your first teaching position, take Sundays for you. Go to the movies, hang out with friends, go swimming. Whatever the case may be you will never get anything accomplished on a Sunday, so you might as well take the day to unwind and enjoy what little of a summer you have. A lot of your search is going to be about balance and not stressing yourself out into a panic. Taking one day a week is a very manageable way to organize your time and make sure you’re not going to get burned out too early.

4.) Everyone’s a critic

Teaching is a unique profession in the sense that everyone around you, teachers or not, will think they know how to do it and will give you advice on your job search. Random people will ask “well, did you call any principals yet?” and you’re supposed to act shocked at this revelation that is going to single-handedly turn your career around. Your friends and family will mean well, which it makes it very difficult to get upset with them when they turn to you in May wondering why you haven’t found work. You have done your research; you know when districts start hiring or when they have career fairs…etc, just hold your head up high. It’s difficult when you feel you’re doing every little thing you can to find a job and your family and friends are breathing down your neck and offering patronizing advice like “make sure you have extra copies of your resume.” Extra copies? WHAT? Slow down, let me get a pen, I want to get all of this written down! The best advice is to smile and nod and don’t let their ignorance of our profession get under your skin.

 5.) Learn to love the hoops

Contrary to what movies (and your family) will tell you, teaching is not a one “30-minute-interview-handshake” sort of thing anymore (see #2). A very plausible scenario: you to attend a career fair and give a 5-minute meet and greet, to which they will schedule another follow-up interview (usually lasting about 30-40 minutes) after that interview you would make it to the second round, which is a 20 minute teaching demonstration lesson, followed by an hour-long debrief on your lesson’s strengths and weaknesses. Finally they’d narrow it down to two candidates, and you would have to interview an additional time for the position, then wait a week and a half while the principal/admin team makes their decision for which you have a 50/50 shot at. That is roughly 4-5 hoops to jump through. Urban districts, rural districts, and every district in between have a lengthy screening process that, (unless you’re in one of the three categories mentioned in #1) will take some time to complete. There is no way around this process, and the only way to win the game is to play it. You will have to love the process, because if you don’t life will become a meaningless abyss and you’ll end up like one of those teaching majors who take some desk job somewhere and convince themselves they’re happier not being in a classroom. Stick with it! It is what everyone else is doing and you will make it out alive.

6.) There aren’t always right answers

So congrats, you landed the interview! That is a feat in and of itself because principals and assistant principals have to sort through so many different resumes and qualified applications that making the cut that first time is a success. When looking for your first teaching job out of college, it is hard to get out of that “right/wrong, black/white, yes/no” mentality. In your education classes there were right or wrong answers. However, in interviews with principals (especially the earlier ones) they are just looking for how you think or how you shape your ideas/philosophy over time. Answer the questions as succinctly and honestly as you can. Sometimes they may ask a question you know nothing about, such as a specific theory or score-reporting software. In these cases, just admit you’re unfamiliar with whatever concept they are asking you about, but are willing to do some independent research. Hundreds of applicants will be b.s.-ing answers all day to their faces, and most principals will thank you for your honesty. Get out of that “right/wrong” dichotomy because it’s going to put a lot more stress on you when speaking with the principal. There is, of course, the possibility that whomever is interviewing you will hate all your answers, and that’s fine (see #7) that just means it’s somewhere you don’t want to be, or wouldn’t “gel” well with the rest of the staff.

7.) Go to every interview

This sounds like common sense, and the angry skeptic might read this point as “oh yeah, let me turn down all the NOTHING I’m getting offered.” Hold tight. After working your way through May and June and maybe even early July you will finally start to get some traction. Schools will start calling you back slowly, but surely. Think of it as the first snowflake of an avalanche, or the first drop in a rainstorm, or whatever various “more will come” metaphor you’d prefer. You start to hack your way through the jungle of hoops and a few schools tell you you’re being “highly considered” or “you’re the favorite candidate for this position.” That is great news! However, be wary of ever assuming you’ve got a job in the bag. There may be a point where you’re so sure one school wants to hire you, and then you’ll get another call. Go to that interview. Until your signature is ink on paper, keep jumping through the hoops. Sometimes the best school will contact you later in the year and might be the best thing for you. The universe is a random and chaotic thing, so keep as many options open as possible and be careful about shutting doors too quickly.  

8.) Don’t kid yourself on where you want to be

In line with #6, be honest about what kind of environment, and what kind of student body you want to teach. Some of your peers will opt for the more rural areas where you have to drive 30 minutes to get to a Wal-Mart; the class sizes are smaller and the kids have a lot of parental involvement. However, some of your peers will opt for more urban areas, some of your peers will opt for a suburb area or a private school; they all have pros and cons. At any rate, make sure you know what kind of area you want to be in, and make those a top priority in your search for a job. Spending a year in an environment you hate will drive you nuts and, frankly, it will rub off on your students and will be a bad situation all around. When you feel like you’re drowning, you might be quick to accept “any port in a storm,” and this is entirely natural. However, fight this urge. Your students will sense it, your administration will sense it, and that’s bad news. You may be waiting a bit longer, and other jobs might pass you up in the meantime, but it is better to wait for a position you could really see yourself in rather than taking the first offer that comes along.

 9.) Your resume will never matter as much as your personality

Over the years you may have added many fellow education majors to Facebook (through classes, for projects, whatever.) You will have seen these peers teach in classes, and through four years you’ll have a rough idea of how these men and women are in a classroom. These peers will forget to turn on projectors, refuse to accept any criticisms of their lesson plans, or speak so softly they couldn’t command an army of ants let alone a classroom. Every other day you will see someone post a status announcing their new position of gainful employment. Some of these people you will remark “oh, good for them!” and for others your jaw will drop in disbelief that some district out there in the world gave that person a job. It’s rude, it’s petty, but you will think it. Bottom line: be prepared to see bad teachers get jobs before you. That’s because they met with a principal who, more than likely, just felt like that applicant would be a “good fit” for their building. Often they are correct. Your resume is incredibly important to getting your foot in the door, but at the end of the day that personality has to shine through because that is what’s going to clinch you the job.

10.) We are all on the same ship

There are some who believe that finding your first teaching job is a zero-sum game. (Your loss is their win.) These people will commonly say things like “I’m not sharing any of my resources!” or “Why would I tell people about openings I know about? Then someone else could get them!” Do not, under any circumstances, choose to be one of those people. Teaching is a profession built on collaboration and the people who respond to the stress of searching for a job by lashing out and treating everyone like the enemy make this process practically unbearable. Sometimes a friend will get a call from an urban school, and she’ll pass your name along to them instead because she’d prefer something more rural. Sometimes it is just that easy. We, as educators, have enough to deal with trying to find that first job without worrying about our peers stabbing us in the back.  We are all passengers on the same ship just trying to get into classrooms to inspire and foster students. Rest assured you will get into a classroom, and all the effort will be worth it. Once you finally secure that job, do you really want to turn around and see that no one’s behind you because you were more interested in stepping on necks than helping people out?

One day your grandkids will ask “what was the best day of your life?” and having kids and grandkids and winning the lottery and solving the world’s problems will pale in comparison to the day a principal calls you to offer you the position. That moment is coming; be prepared and try to relax.

Kale massaged with lemon juice and garlic salt topped with basmati rice, chili cumin chickpeas, corn, avocado, cherry tomatoes, and chipotle tahini sauce 💕🌷

I went to a career fair today and had a really great talk with a potential employer. She wants to talk with me next week so fingers crossed!

Here are some page ideas to help you get started with the new school year! 

  • goals for the school year
  • snack recipes 
  • outfit ideas (with a collage!)
  • motivational quotes
  • songs to blast on your way home from school
  • new people you’ve met (+ their phone numbers!)
  • things you want to learn this year
  • pen swatches (with all your new school supplies)
  • birthdays to remember!! 
  • important dates (such as finals, due dates, holidays, etc.) 
  • formulas you can’t remember (write them down and memorize them!)
  • ‘I’m in school because…’
  • a page dedicated to your college/grad school/career goals
  • interesting words you learned (+ their definitions) 
  • a page to stick receipts/tickets from all the cool things you did during the school year
  • have your friends write you a letter that you can’t open until the end of the school year! 
  • grade trackers 
  • a page for cool stickers you got (from assignments/events/college or career fairs) 
  • a page to write down every single thing that’s stressing you out
  • a solution page to try and get rid of that stress 
  • a letter to your future self (something you can’t read til graduation!) 

I hope these inspired you as much as they inspired me. Best of luck in the upcoming school year, and if you’ve already started, kick this school year in the ass!