California Environmental Protection Agency

CALIFORNIA CITY WILL FINE COUPLE $500 FOR NOT WATERING BROWN LAWN, STATE WILL FINE’EM $500 IF THEY DO

When you’re in a steady relationship, communication is clear. Because when mom says to do one thing, and dad says another, the kids get really confused. Such is the case in California, where the state has issued rules for homeowners to conserve water in the midst of extreme drought, with fines of $500 per day or violating those guidelines, but one city is threatening to fine a couple $500 —…

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Moratorium on fracking OK'd by LA City Council committee

Moratorium on fracking OK’d by LA City Council committee

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Protestors hold signs against fracking during a demonstration outside of the California Environmental Protection Agency headquarters in Sacramento.

A Los Angeles City Council committee recommended a moratorium on fracking Tuesday, citing the state’s drought, residents’ health concerns and what the practice could mean for the city in the event of an earthquake.

T…

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DWR Releases Report on Groundwater Basins With Potential Shortages, Monitoring, Gaps

SACRAMENTO– The Department of Water Resources (DWR) today released a report on groundwater showing that throughout California groundwater resources are at historically low levels. Directed by Governor Edmund G Brown Jr.’s emergency drought declaration in January, the report details basins with potential water shortages and gaps in groundwater monitoring. This report will form the basis for future…

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California withholds findings on oilfield contamination

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – California oil-and-gas regulators have refused for nearly a year to release findings of what they termed a “highest-priority” investigation of possible oilfield contamination into the water aquifers that serve millions of people in and around Los Angeles.

Concerns about the safety of oilfield injection wells in the region are among many dogging state oil and gas regulators.

California is under orders from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to do more to protect drinking-water aquifers from contamination by the oil and gas industry. California is the country’s No. 3 oil-producing state.

Home to more than 18 million people, the Los Angeles basin is also the scene of a more than century-oil oil industry that peaked in the 1930s but continues today.

A separate, state-commissioned report by the California Council on Science and Technology and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory this month on the safety of the process known as fracking noted that a half-million Los Angeles-area residents live, work or go to school within a mile of an oil well that is being created by the intensive method of hydraulic fracturing.

The state’s main oilfield regulating office, the Department of Conservation’s Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources, notified the U.S. EPA last year that it had reviewed the safety of more than 2,000 injection wells pumping oilfield wastewater and other material into water aquifers in and around the Los Angeles area.

Specifically, state oil and gas regulators said they looked at whether regulators currently and in the 1930s and 1940s properly evaluated any risk of contamination from oilfield injection wells. Inspectors examined whether old and recent injection wells could be leaking contaminating fluids into drinking-water reserves, oilfield inspectors wrote.

The state completed its draft report on that investigation by August, the state told the EPA in a letter that month.

The next month, however, California oilfield regulators refused an Associated Press request for the findings on the safety review of the Los Angeles-area oilfield injection wells.

At the time, spokesman Ed Wilson wrote to the AP that the results of the state’s investigation into the Los Angeles-area oilfield injection wells “is expected to inform policy deliberations upon its completion.” The state would release the findings only in a joint report with the policy recommendations, Wilson said.

On Thursday, 10 months later, state oil and gas supervisor Steve Bohlen said the state now expected to release the findings within weeks.

The analysis “will inform the public process on new regulations governing underground injection, and will be fully available to the public when it is complete,” Bohlen said.

An environmental group called for immediate release of the findings.

“State oil officials need to come clean about this dirty threat to L.A.’s water supplies,” Hollin Kretzmann, an attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement.

“It makes no sense to sit on information that’s so vital to the public health,” Kretzmann said. “The results should be made public immediately.”

California withholds findings on oilfield contamination

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – California oil-and-gas regulators have refused for nearly a year to release findings of what they termed a “highest-priority” investigation of possible oilfield contamination into the water aquifers that serve millions of people in and around Los Angeles.

Concerns about the safety of oilfield injection wells in the region are among many dogging state oil and gas regulators.

California is under orders from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to do more to protect drinking-water aquifers from contamination by the oil and gas industry. California is the country’s No. 3 oil-producing state.

Home to more than 18 million people, the Los Angeles basin is also the scene of a more than century-oil oil industry that peaked in the 1930s but continues today.

A separate, state-commissioned report by the California Council on Science and Technology and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory this month on the safety of the process known as fracking noted that a half-million Los Angeles-area residents live, work or go to school within a mile of an oil well that is being created by the intensive method of hydraulic fracturing.

The state’s main oilfield regulating office, the Department of Conservation’s Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources, notified the U.S. EPA last year that it had reviewed the safety of more than 2,000 injection wells pumping oilfield wastewater and other material into water aquifers in and around the Los Angeles area.

Specifically, state oil and gas regulators said they looked at whether regulators currently and in the 1930s and 1940s properly evaluated any risk of contamination from oilfield injection wells. Inspectors examined whether old and recent injection wells could be leaking contaminating fluids into drinking-water reserves, oilfield inspectors wrote.

The state completed its draft report on that investigation by August, the state told the EPA in a letter that month.

The next month, however, California oilfield regulators refused an Associated Press request for the findings on the safety review of the Los Angeles-area oilfield injection wells.

At the time, spokesman Ed Wilson wrote to the AP that the results of the state’s investigation into the Los Angeles-area oilfield injection wells “is expected to inform policy deliberations upon its completion.” The state would release the findings only in a joint report with the policy recommendations, Wilson said.

On Thursday, 10 months later, state oil and gas supervisor Steve Bohlen said the state now expected to release the findings within weeks.

The analysis “will inform the public process on new regulations governing underground injection, and will be fully available to the public when it is complete,” Bohlen said.

An environmental group called for immediate release of the findings.

“State oil officials need to come clean about this dirty threat to L.A.’s water supplies,” Hollin Kretzmann, an attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement.

“It makes no sense to sit on information that’s so vital to the public health,” Kretzmann said. “The results should be made public immediately.”

TechWaste Recycling, LLC. Gets Certified as Responsible Recycler (R2)

SANTA ANA, Calif., July 20, 2015 /PRNewswire/ – Southern California based TechWaste Recycling, LLC., electronics recycler providing electronics recycling, secure data destruction, and IT asset disposition services has recently received Responsible Recycling Practices Standard (R2), ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001 certifications recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its Southern California facility.

Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150717/237979

Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150717/237980LOGO

TechWaste Recycling, LLC. is a progressive electronics waste management company that helps businesses and organizations incorporate and maintain various electronics recycling management and IT asset disposition programs.

We’ve made many important improvements to our infrastructure, system, and processes to provide our clients with increased value and assurance when handling and processing material, wiping data from hard drives and other media, and setting up the right enterprise solution for IT professionals,” says Mario Rojas, VP and Environmental, Health, and Safety Officer for TechWaste Recycling, LLC.

With these new certifications, TechWaste Recycling, LLC. will continue its commitment to provide electronic waste and recycling services with focus on environmental sustainability. TechWaste Recycling employs effective reuse methods to minimize the amount of electronic waste being accumulated in landfills while protecting customer data and processing equipment to the highest health, safety, and environmental standards.

ABOUT TECHWASTE RECYCLING 
Santa Ana, California-based TechWaste Recycling is a progressive electronics recycling company focused on providing businesses with responsible electronics recycling, secure data destruction, and IT asset disposition services designed to meet short and long-term corporate and environmental goals. TechWaste Recycling specializes in the collection, sorting, dismantling and recycling of all electronics and electronic components. It is the goal of TechWaste Recycling to provide excellent customer service and uphold the highest ethical and environmental stewardship standards. Their commitments are to forge long-term efficacious business relationships with their customers and provide unparalleled and innovative electronics recycling management solutions. TechWaste Recycling is a licensed ISO 14001:2004/OHSAS 18001:2007/Responsible Recycling© (R2) Rev. 7/2013/Low Risk Standard, #C2015-00966 company which is also registered with the Department of Toxic Substance Control, DTSC #CAL000374913, and Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, CEWID #115306.

PUBLIC RELATIONS CONTACT: 
Mario Rojas, TechWaste Recycling, Email, (657) 600-4832

To learn more about TechWaste Recycling, please contact Corporate Office:

Mario Rojas 
TechWaste Recycling 
1940 E. Occidental Street, Santa Ana, CA 92705 
Email 
https://www.techwasterecycling.com

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/techwaste-recycling-llc-gets-certified-as-responsible-recycler-r2-300115219.html

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