CCSS

Common Core isn’t the problem here.
The problem is all the parents who immediately dismiss better, more effective ways of teaching math because it’s “different” from what they learned.
If Herrmann doesn’t understand what his son is doing, then they should sit down together and work through it. Read the textbook. Go to Google. Ask the teacher for help. Any of those things would have helped and none of them would have taken very long.
Instead, Herrmann wasted everyone’s time by writing a useless check and putting it on Facebook.
Because, to people like him, ignorance is hilarious. He’d rather see his son learn math the old-fashioned way, putting him in danger of struggling in his math career as he gets older, instead of course-correcting early in his education when everything is still fresh.
To answer the obvious rebuttal, yes, a lot of adults are able to get through the day just fine even though they were never very good at math. But why wouldn’t they want their children to aim higher, understand things better, and think more critically?
I’m not a shill for Common Core. I’m just someone who understands what it is, unlike Doug Herrmann, who couldn’t explain it to you if he tried.

Eu prometi que não iria me afastar de você, que não iria te deixar, muito menos te abandonar. Ironia não? Fico me perguntando o que foi que aconteceu para que terminasse dessa maneira. Sinceramente, sinto sua falta, cada segundo que passa, cada minuto, sem você para poder conversar, sem você para poder brigar, sem você para me fazer sorrir. Estou perdida, sem rumo, sem saber para onde ir. Apenas vivendo, na esperança - sim esperança de que a qualquer momento você apareça e diga que foi tudo um engano e que não deveria ter desistido, muito menos ter permitido que eu me afastasse.

▬ 9º dia sem ele

9

What We Have Become

Three years ago, we didn't even know each other.
Today, we're far more than comrades.
Perhaps... even more than friends.

(Art credit: episode 13 end card drawn by ノ村優)

Note: This is supposed to be a CCSS present, but for some reason I just couldn’t submit the photoset. Or maybe I’m just too dumb. LOL. Anyway - hope you like it nympshandcheese.

Tudo que você me disse foi sincero? Eu só queria ter essa certeza! Porque sinceramente eu não consigo entender a maneira como essa amizade acabou. Assim, como um dia de sol. E de repente vem a tempestade. Tempestade essa que me fez desmoronar, me fazendo perder o rumo. Me tirando a visão. Me fazendo ficar cega. Porque é assim que eu me sinto. Tentando encontrar respostas. Respostas essas que talvez eu nunca vá encontrar. E será tudo em vão? Não quero. Eu não posso me permitir. Eu tenho que arrumar uma maneira, um jeito de fazer com que essa tempestade desapareça. Eu preciso encontrar um dia de sol, belo, quente, aconchegante e que nunca me deixe em dúvida de uma próxima tempestade!

▬ 27º dias sem ele

washingtonpost.com
7 facts you should know about new Common Core tests

How much will these standardized tests really change public education?

  1. Myth: Common Core tests will be much better than current exams, with many items measuring higher-order skills. Reality: The new tests will largely consist of the same old multiple-choice questions.
  2. Myth: Adoption of Common Core exams will end No Child Left Behind testing overkill. Reality: Under Common Core, there will be many more tests and the same misuses.
  3. Myth: New multi-state assessments will save taxpayers money. Reality: Test costs will increase for most states. Schools will spend even more for computer infrastructure upgrades.
  4. Myth: New assessment consortia will actually design the tests rather than well-known test manufacturers who have made mistakes in the past. Reality: The same profit-driven companies,  including Pearson, Educational Testing Service and CTB/McGraw-Hill, are producing the tests.
  5. Myth: Common Core assessments are designed to meet the needs of all students. Reality: Not yet. The new tests could put students with disabilities and English-language learners at risk.
  6. Myth: Common Core “proficiency” is an objective measure of college- and career-readiness. Reality: Proficiency levels on Common Core tests are subjective, like all performance levels.
  7. Myth: States have to implement the Common Core assessments.
    Reality: No, they don’t. 

The Crimson Cravat is officially inviting you to be a part of the Crimson Cravat Secret Santa or CCSS!!

Secret Santa: an exchange of gifts with an anonymous name. :)

So here’s how it’s going to work:

-Reblog this post.

-Any URL that reblogs this will have their name put into the drawing. Each person will be assigned another person to give their gift to.

-Make a post on your own blog with your likes and dislikes pertaining to RivaMika. (This will make it easier to the person giving the gift.) Tag this post with ccss so that the person giving you a gift can find the post on your blog easily. Givers, just add /tagged/ccss to the end of their blog URL to find the likes/dislikes list.

-ALL REBLOGS MUST BE BEFORE DECEMBER 5TH OR YOUR NAME WILL NOT BE INCLUDED IN THE DRAWING.

-Gift delivery will be during the week of Christmas (Sunday December 22 - Saturday December 28th)

-Make sure your submit box is open so that we can deliver the gifts at the end of December. Submit under your own name so that you can tell your person that you were their Secret Santa!

-Follow the Crimson Cravat Secret Santa for more updates!


Everything is really appreciated. Don’t be afraid to spoil your person! Ideas for the presents can include edits, fanfiction, fanart, playlists, etc. Also, sending little anonymous messages to your person is a great little idea that you can do on top of the present. Go crazy. It’s up to your imagination as to what to give your person. :)

If there are any questions, either message this blog or me for answers.

The person you are giving the gift to should be messaged/fanmailed to you around the first weekend of December.

Gif Credit {X}

Merry Cravatmas!!

Educators say they were told last year that the new test would be more rigorous. But some say they weren’t prepared for the new assessments to take three times as long as the former test. The Journal Review reported that testing schedules distributed by the state anticipate it will take third-grade students nine hours and 25 minutes to complete the test. Fourth-graders can expect 10 hours and 40 minutes of testing, while fifth-graders will face 10 hours and 30 minutes of testing, the newspaper reported.

Sabe o que realmente me machucou? Não foi você se afastar, não foi você me tratar com indiferença, não foi você fingir não sentir. Foi simplesmente você dizer que tanto faz. Tanto faz? Tanto faz o que? Tanto faz sentir e não dizer? Tanto faz querer e não tentar? Tanto faz fingir que está tudo bem, mesmo sabendo que não está? Se pra você tanto faz cura a dor, faz esquecer, faz diminuir o sentimento. Se pra você eu me tornei um tanto faz realmente tudo em que eu acreditava, tudo em que você me fez acreditar não passa de um tanto faz. 

▬ 6º dia sem ele

ltusdbridgetoccss.org
6-8 Unpacked ELA Standards
This page contains the unpacked 6-8 Unpacked ELA Standards. You can click the links to download the files.

File under “stuff you probably already knew about” but in my quest for a SBG classroom I was looking for a resource that really broke each standard down into manageable pieces for my various assignments and assessments. 

Behold, this website, chock-full of various educational goodies and resources. Hope it helps, edchums!

How the Common Core State Standards Will Transform English Language Arts Instruction

These standards will likely lead to the greatest changes in reading instruction seen for generations. One of the biggest transformations will be to reading lessons, involving changes that will upset traditional approaches that have been in place for decades. These communal reading lessons have gone by many names (e.g., directed reading lessons, guided reading), but all variations include a group of students reading a text together under the supervision of a teacher, and it is that daily event that will change most.

A Rivamika Playlist for the Crimson Cravat Secret Santa.

“Glory and gore go hand in hand.”

{Listen} {Artist}

(i hope you like this mix, dear! merry christmas and more presents are on the way!)

Eu disse adeus na insignificativa esperança de ouvir de volta um fica. E por mais que tenha sido doloroso ver você me respondendo de volta com um adeus, por mais que tenha me machucado, acabado comigo eu não parei de sentir. Por mais que houvessem brigas, desentendimentos, ciumes, dramas eu acreditei em cada palavra que você disse. E foi nessa esperança que eu permaneci aqui, por mim e por você. E mesmo tendo vontade de me afastar, desistir eu não o fiz. Mesmo que tudo tenha sido em vão, eu te amei, eu te amo de verdade. E o que eu sinto por você será carregado comigo, por onde quer que eu vá. 

▬ 3º dia sem ele

educationnext.org
Is Common Core Too Hard for Kindergarten?

A report last month from a pair of advocacy organizations, the Alliance for Childhood and Defending the Early Years, argued that “there is a widespread belief that teaching children to read early will help them be better readers in the long-run,” but that there is “no scientific evidence that this is so.” The Washington Post and its Common Core-averse education blogger, Valerie Strauss, have been particularly aggressive in highlighting this report and running pieces from both parents and teachers arguing that “forcing some kids to read before they are ready could be harmful.”

The report, titled Reading in Kindergarten: Little to Gain and Much to Lose sounds an alarm over a perceived shift “from play-based, experiential approaches to more academic approaches” in early-childhood classrooms starting in the 1980s. “Under the Common Core State Standards (CCSS),” the authors claim, “the snowball has escalated into an avalanche which threatens to destroy appropriate and effective approaches to early education.”

The authors make much of the fact that no one involved with writing the standards was a K–3 teacher or early-childhood professional. The more important issue, however, isn’t who wrote it, but whether Common Core is beyond the abilities of five-year-olds or the expectations we should have for them. The short answer, I think, is “no.” But let’s look at some of the report’s specific complaints.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!!!!

I’m really sorry for the long silence but here is a rivamika+yukata pic I hope you like ^.^

your CCSS

THIS IS FOR ME????? Okay let me now attempt to articulate how much I LOVE LOVE LOVE (loooove) this where do I begin. Umm this is BEAUTIFUL it’s exactly what I wanted thank you so much!! I MEAN LOOK AT THEIR YUKATAS AND THEY’RE FACING AWAY FROM EACH OTHER and okay I failed at staying calm :D You are the best secret santa don’t you even worry and Merry Christmas!