2

OAKLAND, CA

SUN JUL 31 - 10:00 AM

Southside Flea Market

#MLKSitInOAK

We will gather at a booth in the historic Berkeley Flea Market at 10am.

Look for the people wearing white!

We will have family friendly activities, such as face painting and a glitter playdoh area. Providing a healing space is the spirit of the event. Knowing that healing takes many forms, we will have a place for participants to create signs to be caarried. A few lesser known empowering quotes from Dr. Martin Luther King will be provided, if needed.

At 1pm, we will join in with thousands across the country and the globe and recite, in unison, a passage from Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech. We will then march southbound on MLK Way from Berkeley to Frank Oagawa Plaza in Oakland, CA.

All bodies are wellcome to march!

We will be dressed in white to convey Peace, Love and Freedom.

Address: 3100 Adeline St, Berkeley, CA 94703

This event is part of the National #MLKSitIn Day of Action
A national gathering of everyday people in an occupational protest on every single street named for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in America on Sunday July 31st

2

LOS ANGELES, CA

SUN JUL 31 - 11:00 AM

King Blvd & Crenshaw

#MLKSitInLA

Please join us and represent Los Angeles with this Community gathering, occupying MLK spaces across the nation. Bring your children, your family and friends, all are welcome.

We will be occupying King Blvd & Crenshaw Blvd and show resistance through our JOY, to LOVE despite the pain, to continue our fight for PEACE.

Please join us:
if you believe that America must put an end to the racist treatment of Black people…
If you believe that America must be proactive in the fight against police brutality…
If you believe that America owes tremendous gratitude to the millions of people who built this nation from the ground up…
If you believe that America must dismantle systemic poverty…
If you believe that America must end its terrorist wars against its Black citizens…
If you believe that America must abide by its laws and honor the civil and human rights of its Black citizens…
If you believe that America must acknowledge, respect, and carve out time and space for Black joy to flourish…

This is the event for YOU!

anonymous asked:

Hello! I have a question for you guys. It's very important. I'm a transman and I'm getting married very soon to my beautiful wife to be. She's Japanese and I'm white and American. We met while we were both studying in England (during our international student orientation, actually). For one of our weddings (yes, we are holding 2 ceremonies because 1. We can't be legitimately married in Japan, where she wants it held. And 2. My parents won't get on a plane since 9/11), my fiancé (1/?)

wants me to a traditional Japanese kimono. This is for the ceremony that will be held in Japan (but won’t be legitimate) for her parents, family, and friends. I don’t know if this would be cultural appropriation. I’ve asked her and she says it’s totally fine because it’s our wedding. She won’t budge on it. I know that we are having a wedding in the U.S. for my family and for legitimacy a few months after the Japanese ceremony where she’s going to wear my mother’s wedding dress ( (2/?) She asked my mother when my mother showed her her old beautiful wedding pictures.) So, we could just hold the same ceremony with the same clothing in both places. I just don’t want to be offensive. She can wear her wedding kimono to the Japanese event and then my mother’s dress to the American event if she wants, but since I’m white, would it be inappropriate to wear the wedding kimono she has picked out for me? Thanks so much!! (3/3)

Hi friend!

So, first off, congrats on getting married! :DDD

That being said, I’m not Japanese, so I don’t want to speak on Japanese issues, however, when it comes to cultural appropriation the general rule (across multiple cultures) is that if you’re invited to participate by someone of that culture, that’s fine for that event. Using that logic, if your Japanese wife to be wants you to wear a Kimono for the wedding, that’s totally cool and fine, because she’s inviting you to partake. What wouldn’t be okay, is if you were to start wearing a Kimono to work every day, because why not? Or if your fiance was white and thought it would be cool, or whatever, but since your wife to be is Japanese, then you should be good.

Although, I would like to point out that it’s kinda weird, that you thought to come to a prochoice blog where none of the mods are Japanese to ask this. I mean, I appreciate that yall value our opinions, but please in the future listen to your wife, when she is speaking on her culture. If, in the future you want to get more opinions then hers (say, because maybe you don’t want her to feel tokenized, or put her in a situation where she’s expected to represent all Japanese people ever) you should then consult other Japanese people, because I promise you that no one will know Japanese culture better than Japanese people. 

In either case, I wish yall a happy marriage, and fun weddings! 

~River

2

SAN JOSÉ, CA

SUN JUL 31 - 12:00 PM

Dr. MLK Jr Library
150 E San Fernando Street

#MLKSitInSanJosé

We have the blessing of the library to congregate on the paved area in front of the entrance plaza. We’re providing chalk for children (of all ages) to make sidewalk art, as well as a story time with MLK Jr. and social justice themed kids books. We’ll be providing water, a few snacks, and kids supplies like sunscreen, diapers, and squeezie food packets. We’re folks ot bring food or snacks to share, and, in honor of our city’s MLK Jr. memorial being our largest, central library, a free library where people can bring and take books that inspire them (books by authors of color and/or about social justice encouraged). We’re hoping to organize some community music as well, and we’ll be having the everyone come together to contribute to a banner with art and words from the community, which we will then donate to the MLK Jr. Library at the end of the event.

This event is part of the National #MLKSitIn Day of Action
A national gathering of everyday people in an occupational protest on every single street named for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in America on Sunday July 31st