Bureau of Land Management

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The superbloom has migrated north to California’s Central Valley, and the show is simply indescribable at Carrizo Plain National Monument. The Valley floor has endless expanses of yellows and purples from coreopsis, tidy tips and phacelia, with smaller patches of dozens of other species. Not to be outdone, the Temblor Range is painted with swaths of wildlflowers in oranges yellow and purple like something out of a storybook. Visitors are flocking to the area to see this explosion of color, and travelers should be prepared with a full tank of gas as there are no services in the monument. Photos by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

mashable.com
Interior Dept. agency changes website from family visiting park to a giant pile of coal
Get out and enjoy that giant coal seam this weekend!
By Andrew Freedman

This is ridiculous. Within the past 24 hours, several major national and regional media sources reported that the BLM (Bureau of Land Management) had changed the photo on its home page from this:

To this, showing a seam of coal:

So, the BLM is telling the world that it’s in the business of extraction and making the industries that want to exploit, dig, mine, trash and ruin our public lands rich and richer and richest, and fuck the rest of us.

So, I just went to the web site, and obviously somebody said “WTF……?” and changed it to this:

Another example, adding to the pile of hundreds and thousands of examples, of how totally fucked up, rudderless, clueless and dysfunctional the trump administration is, in particular the Department of the Interior. 

anonymous asked:

This is going to sound like a stupid question, but it seems like most of your campsites are literally just in the middle of no where, not like at a legit camping ground. Is that necessarily legal? Asking because I'm real inspired to try something like this myself

This is not a dumb question at all - and perfectly relevant to our current fight to protect our public lands.  I can legally camp in the middle of nowhere because I do so on public lands - lands owned by all American Citizens.  This is land set aside for public use - be it camping, hunting, fishing, biking, climbing, hiking, etc…  Public Lands are owned and supported by tax payers and also sometimes referred to as Federal Land (most research shows public land costs about $4 dollars per tax payer a year).  Restrictions depend on the agency that manages the area - most BLM (Bureau of Land Management) land has very few restrictions and allows for camping almost anywhere (without the need for a campground).  However, I strongly encourage Leave No Trace ethics when camping in wilderness and if you are going to camp on our public lands please go to the following link and read the 7 Leave No Trace Principles:

 https://lnt.org/learn/7-principles 

I prefer to camp in the wild - to leave the city behind and experience the outdoors as a refuge from human impact - and in order to continue to experience it as such we need to keep it looking as if we were never there.  I am a climber, a hunter, a mountaineer, a fisher, a hiker, a biker, and most importantly I was lucky enough to be born in the USA which gives me access to public wilderness as if I had the money to own a cabin in the mountains.  However, I don’t have the money to own a cabin and so when the weekend rolls around I throw a few things in the back of the Land Cruiser and head for public lands… I find a spot that is my own, that feels as if I am one of the few lucky enough to sit on this rock and watch the sun go down - and I am lucky.  

Watch the video link below:  4 minute bipartisan history of how the USA came to have so much public federal land, specifically in the west.  This video educated me on how almost all federal land has always been federal land - and is not land that was taken from the states:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rC_mnRu-4gA

It is my opinion that there is falsehood in state legislator’s desire to want public lands to be taken from the federal government and given to the state for the resident’s interests and stats seem to support this.  Federal land is held in a trust for the use of the American people -  and that’s it, that’s all, it is there for our future generations - so that I can teach my kid to ethically hunt and camp in the mountains just as my grandfather and father taught me.  Some states do a great job with land they manage for public access, but the problem is that the land is no longer explicitly a trust and if the wrong individuals become elected, or are already are elected, that land can now be sold to private entities and will no longer be accessible to the public. In FACT 156 MILLION acres of Federal Public Land has been transferred to states and of that land 70% has been sold to private entities - that is 110 MILLION acres that we don’t have shared access to use anymore.  I would rather not risk the possibility of my land being sold off so that I can not use it.  Historically this has occurred when a state’s budget isn’t balanced because it is pretty easy to sell of a chunk of land to compensate for debt. 

Please read the Field and Stream article in the Link below it is easy and incredibly informative:

http://www.fieldandstream.com/keep-public-lands-in-public-hands#page-3

Please vote to protect our public lands! 

Public lands for our use and what agency manages them can be seen in the map below: 


Today we’re celebrating our national bird, the bald eagle, for American Eagle Day. On June 20, 1782, the bald eagle was placed at the center of the Great Seal of the United States and remains a symbol of our proud country. After a dramatic recovery, bald eagles are found in every state but Hawaii, soaring high and inspiring the nation. Photo from the Gulkana Wild and Scenic River in Alaska by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

A Bureau of Land Management worker posted this video on their facebook page saying that they “captured this strange ‘thing’ swimming in the Chena River in Fairbanks”. The ‘creature’ in this video was soon named the Alaska Ice Monster and spread like wildfire. Theories started flying about what this was. An Alaskan Nessie? Some kind of arctic crocodile? A giant fish? 

It boils down to something much simpler: frazil ice stuck to a rope that is attached to a nearby pier. Frazil ice is soft ice that cannot completely freeze due to turbulent water. While the ‘creature’ seems to be moving in the water, a rope is merely swaying in the current.

No, this isn’t another planet. It’s Skyline Rim, near Factory Butte in eastern Utah. Massive wrinkles in the rugged landscape give this place an otherworldly appearance, especially in the fading light of dusk. Photo courtesy of Brock Slinger.

The Owyhee River flows through the 1,000-foot deep “Grand Canyon” of Oregon. Named for a trio of Hawaiian trappers exploring the uncharted river, the word Owyhee is derived from an earlier version of “Hawaii.” Today this river is well-known by rafters for its remote beauty and technically challenging rapids. It’s also a protected Wild & Scenic River to ensure its millions of years of history and archaeological value will be preserved for future generations. Photo by Bureau of Land Management.

For beauty off the beaten path, venture two hours southwest of Albuquerque, New Mexico to the Sierra Ladrones Wilderness Study Area. There are no trails through the area’s diverse landscapes of high mountain peaks, isolated canyons and badlands. Hiking to the top of Ladrones Mountain – pictured here during a storm – rewards visitors with stunning panoramic views of the area’s mesa grasslands and piñon-juniper woodland. Photo by Julie Aguirre, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

Check out this peaceful scene at Table Rock Wilderness in Oregon for International Day of Forests. See old growth Douglas fir and western hemlock along four terrific trails as you hike up to the “fortress” of Table Rock. Breathe in the rich, forest air and remember the poem by Robert Frost, “The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep. And miles to go before I sleep. And miles to go before I sleep.” Photo by Bureau of Land Management, @mypubliclands.

A true oasis in the desert of southwest New Mexico, Gila Lower Box Canyon Wilderness Study Area is a lush thicket of cottonwood, willows and wildflowers. The area provides excellent birding with one of the highest bird diversities in the state. Spring and summer visitors also enjoy river recreation including tubing and fishing. Photo by Mike Howard, Bureau of Land Management.