Broken-treaties

10

Aaron Huey’s photographs show a deep historical wound.

With fearless sensitivity, he tells the story of manifest destiny through the eyes of the Lakota Indians. His haunting photos reveal how devastating that legacy still is today. “The suffering of indigenous peoples is not a simple issue to fix,” he says in his TEDTalk. But he offers a way forward, asking us all to learn the real history and honor the broken treaties. 

Watch the talk here >>

REST IN POWER, ANNA MAE PICTOU AQUASH!
This month marks 40-years since the murder/death of the Mi'kmaq activist/warrior! Anna Mae would have been 70 years old.

About Anna Mae Pictou Aquash (March 27, 1945 – mid-December 1975):

Annie Mae PictouAquash (Mi’kmaq name Naguset Eask) was a Mi’kmaq activist from Nova Scotia, Canada, who became a member of the American Indian Movement, on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, United States during the mid-1970s.
Aquash participated in the 1972 Trail of Broken Treaties and occupation of the Department of Interior headquarters in Washington, DC; the Wounded Knee Incident in 1973; and armed occupations in Canada and Wisconsin in following years. On February 24, 1976, her body was found on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota; she was initially determined to have died from exposure but was found to have been executed by gunshot. Aquash was thirty years old at the time of her death.

Controversy on Leonard Peltier & the death of Anna Mae Pictou Aquash:

“On Feb. 24th, 1976, the badly decomposed body of a woman was discovered by Rancher Roger Amiotte, while mending fences. On or about Dec.12th, 1975 in the early hours just before dawn broke, the light of a sister who came from the land of the dawn was snuffed out by AIM members. Treated like an animal, she was kidnapped, beaten, raped, interrogated, shot and then callously dumped over a ravine to rot in the badlands. Her name was Annie Mae Pictou Aquash. Betrayed she laid in the snow and watched the sun rise thinking of her family and beloved land of the dawn as she drifted off into death. She left behind a legacy of truth and empowerment that many use to this day to see them thru struggles in everyday life but sadly, few know the domestic torture and violence she suffered in her last few days of life. Very few know who Annie Mae was and what she stood for. She was a quiet humble person who loved to laugh yet would not think twice to step between a dueling couple to protect her sisters. She was a staunch advocate for women’s rights and often spoke the uncomfortable truth within her own group and they silenced her for that. She was betrayed and died a vicious cruel death while “AIM warriors” looked on. To this day those “warriors” including Leonard Peltier continue to hold their tongues and support her murderers publically. Remember Annie Mae today; she walked her talk.“

- Denise Pictou Maloney
https://www.facebook.com/AnnieMaePictouAquash

R.I.S.E.:
RADICAL
INDIGENOUS
SURVIVANCE &
EMPOWERMENT

http://burymyart.tumblr.com
http://facebook.com/RISEindigenous

_______________________.

Hot clean water
wash away
the clumsy kisses
of the night before

wash away
the overflowing ashtrays and flirtations
the growling stomach

wash away
the insatiable appetite
for broken treaties
and trespassed boundaries

Morning shower
wash away
the man I want to be
so I can live with
the one I am

— 

Max Mundan, Ashtrays and Flirtations

© David Rutter 2015

Purchase my book, “JUNKIES DIE ALONE” on Amazon or iTunes.

Here's a thought:

Why aren’t we teaching the unbiased view of history?

The genocides and broken treaties, the medical experiments on prisoners, every single war?

The vaccines, the massive technological advancements, the long standing foreign aid?

Seriously folks, if we want to raise a generation of kids who have a functioning concept of how the world works, we need to show them everything.

The fact that each country teaches it’s kids a watered down and one sided view of history is bullshit.

I cannot express my respect for the standing rock reservation protesters in deep enough terms. Native Americans face huge amounts of violence from police, from broken treaties and systemic constant racism, from all sides, from being talked about as if their communities no longer exist– I hope that in ten years, or twenty, when fresh clean water is a scarce resource, we remember who was fighting the good fight.

Bodies Under the Falls
  • Bodies Under the Falls
  • Panopticon
  • Kentucky
Play

As the water passes over the rock bed, so gentle and quiet,
You can hear their cries in the crashing water.
Bodies dashed against the rocks below where ghosts at the galls roam.
The blood stained soil, their ancestral forest…
Where only trees now know of the horrors seen here.
Forgotten.
A nation left to weep, like spilling water over the falls.
The water passes over stone, falling so far below.
Split blood and splintered bone where Cherokee ghosts roam.
Pale faces in the mist, demons who claim the mountains,
treading beneath looming cliff.
The cool, still air permeating your skin.
The rhythm of the water pounding the forest floor whispers to us with the voices of proud warriors overcome.
The treaty was broken, the land has been stolen.
The forest is haunted!

Hot clean water
wash away
the clumsy kisses
of the night before

wash away
the overflowing ashtrays and flirtations
the growling stomach


wash away
wash away


wash away
the insatiable appetite
for broken treaties
and trespassed boundaries


Morning shower
wash away
the man I want to be
so I can live with
the one I am

— 

Max Mundan, Ashtrays and Flirtations

© David Rutter 2016

Get my new book, “Five Words That Can Cripple a Man” by clicking right  HERE!