don’t touch cyberpunk if you don’t get it.

don’t act like you’re on some holy crusade when you make a video game with neon and rain and the look of cyberpunk but then throw in stuff like how women’s rights and basic income are the backbone of a dystopia

don’t make a movie with scarlett johansson playing a poor send-up to motoko kusanagi and then lack the spine to even mention the socio-political points of why the character prefers a caucasian chassis in the first place (spoiler alert: it makes incredibly unkind point about western women). especially don’t call it feminist when the themes and narrative are stripped away in favor of a generic revenge tale. don’t retell akira and put it within and about the culture that dropped those nukes in the first place. the teenage edgelord connoisseurs can just go watch these anime and film in the first place

don’t copyright the word ‘cyberpunk’ no matter how noble your intentions are. you have no real way of guaranteeing that your successors at your place of work will share your sentiments.

don’t tell another faux-deep story that cosplays badly as Blade Runner about a hacker or a detective or an android and his manpain 

don’t give me more cool-looking stuff that either lacks the teeth to get political or has the fundamental politics of the genre contorted and perverted so that spoiled Gen X dudes never have to challenge themselves or their way of life. 

just…don’t, okay?

In a few “fan fiction” episodes, the show changes from the adventures of Finn and Jake to those of Fionna and Cake, where every character is a different gender. But it’s essentially just a cosmetic change. Every character retains their original personality, especially Fionna, who just like Finn is brave, strong, and a bit of a dork.

None of that went away when her balls migrated inwards because, and this is important, your genitals don’t have to dictate how you live your life. Except for Deathray-Dick Johnny but I like to think he’s the exception that proves the rule. Always in our hearts, Deathray-Dick.

Feminism started out as a fight for basic civil rights for women, then equal rights, and today, it’s essentially about the freedom of choice, and Fionna is the perfect example of that.

She wears dresses. When she wants. She doesn’t need a boyfriend now. But she’s open to the idea in the future. She kicks ass. But the show doesn’t call her a tomboy for that, nor does she make it a cornerstone of her whole personality. On its own, that wouldn’t mean all that much. But because Fionna exists solely as the female version of a male character, her non-stereotypical characterization becomes a powerful feminist message, namely: You do you, no matter what’s between your legs.

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