Black-actress

A movie about Viola Davis because her life deserves to be known

The only picture I have of my childhood is the picture of me in kindergarten, I have this expression on my face — it’s not a smile, it’s not a frown. I swear to you, that’s the girl who wakes up in the morning and who looks around her house and her life saying, ‘I cannot believe how God has blessed me.’ “ 

“I would jump in trash bins with maggots looking for food, and I would steal from the corner store because I was hungry, I never had any kids come to my house because my house was a condemned building, it was boarded up, it was infested with rats. I was one of those kids who were poor and knew it.” 

“I was the kind of poor where I knew right away I had less than everyone around me. We had nothing, I cannot believe my life, I just can’t, I’m so blessed. I would jump in trash bins with maggots looking for food, and I would steal from the corner store because I was hungry, I never had any kids come to my house because my house was a condemned building, it was boarded up, it was infested with rats. I was one of those kids who were poor and knew it.”

“It became a motivation as opposed to something else — the thing about poverty is that it starts affecting your mind and your spirit because people don’t see you, I chose from a very young age that I didn’t want that for my life. And it very much has helped me appreciate and value the things that are in my life now because I never had it. A yard, a house, great plumbing, a full refrigerator, things that people take for granted, I don’t.”

I first envisioned myself as an actor after I watched Cicely Tyson in The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman when I was a child.”

“It wasn’t until then that I had a visual manifestation of the target I wanted to hit, It also gave me hope for the future and a different life for myself, she helped me have a very specific drive of how I was going to crawl, walk, run from that environment.”

“I became an artist, and thank God I did, because we are the only profession that celebrates what it means to live a life,” 

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“I think that as a black woman, my beingness is a form of activism in and of itself. The fact that I am on a show called Black-ish, that I’m playing a woman who is both a wife and a doctor, a mother and a person, a partner and an individual, and that I am playing a joyful black woman on television who is not just surviving but thriving is by definition a form of activism. If I take that and ripple it out further in an amplified way, I can’t help, from my beingness, to not be a form of activism, because that is who I am.” - Tracee Ellis Ross, Good Housekeeping Magazine

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“When you’re comfortable in what you’re wearing you feel the most powerful. You radiate the most. People can sense that immediately. I’m not necessarily drawn to one particular style, but to people who know how to take their insecurities, spin them on their axes and present them to the world through their clothing.” - Amandla Stenberg, InStyle

Source

Hey Elizabeth! Don’t you have some racist AF, rape culture promoting, homophobic POS movie to make? 

1. Racist AF: the Asian character in both “Pitch Perfect” movies is literally a human joke with no real dialogue, just “weirdo” surreal one-liners. The Latina character in the 2nd movie is the same, and the jokes involve how little her life is worth because she’s Latina. And Banks directed that one! 

2. Rape Culture promoting: see this post - Rape Culture 101: “No Means Yes”

3. Homophobic: the black character’s lesbianism is literally joked about in the first movie and treated with a “hush hush wink wink” vibe from the other girls throughout both. The “Bellas” all treat it as something embarrassing and it’s only treated as normal the one time in each movie that the character shares an anecdote about herself.

To be clear:

1. I’m not saying that Spielberg shouldn’t make more movies with women leads, far from it!

2. I AM saying that it’s peak white feminism when you read through Spielberg’s Wiki or IMDB filmography, see The Color Purple, and not know that movie STARRED OPRAH WINFREY AND WHOOPI GOLDBERG. 

Millennials and young people, you have an excuse - Banks doesn’t. She is 43 and was 11 when the movie came out in 1985. The movie and actresses were nominated for Oscars in ‘86 and Goldberg won the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress. This was not some college film that Spielberg made, it was nominated for 10 Oscars.

3. I am ALSO saying that “Pitch Perfect 2″ directed by Banks was one of the most offensive movies I’ve watched in years (yeah I know there are worst movies, I don’t seek out shit), especially the “throwaway life / who cares if I die” joke line on the Latina character. 

Elizabeth Banks - work on your own shit, hire women of color as writers, and watch The Color Purple for f*cks sake