Bicorns

February 28, 1764: 23-year-old Lord Gitwankerprat, fancying himself an explorer, returns from a maiden journey that took him 17 miles outside of London. The young lord regales an amazed London peerage with wild tales of bicorns and nocorns. A more-savvy member of the aristocracy points out that what Gitwankerprat actually saw were bulls and horses, and that the young lord is an idiot, making Gitwankerprat cry.

  • Me:*watching Glee's back-to-back episodes eagerly*
  • Sister:*Suddenly arrives* Hey, let's go swimming. I need a refreshing dip in the pool.
  • Me:*Eyes never leaving the TV screen* I'm allergic to chlorine. I'll break out into allergies.
  • Sister:Then just go with me.
  • Me:And do what?
  • Sister:Watch me swim. Read a book.
  • Me:.... *watches Glee*
  • Sister:Let's go and play tennis then. Let's be productive and healthy.
  • Me:Ya... No thanks.
  • Sister:*starts to get angry* Oh, come on! You're just lying on the couch, doing nothing!
  • Me:Excuse me, I'm watching Glee right now.
  • Sister:Seriously?!
  • Me:... *continues to watch Glee*
  • Sister:Fucking lesbian!
  • Me:Bi-corn. I'm a bi-corn.
  • Sister:You know what, fuck you. *rants on about my being into girls and uses it against me*
  • Me:.... *continues watching Glee*
  • Sister:So, FUCK YOU AND YOUR GIRLFRIEND. I'm telling mom you're into girls, bitch!
  • Me:Is this the part where I'm supposed to break down and cry and beg you not to tell mom?
  • Sister:FUCK YOU. *Storms out and slams bedroom door*
  • Me:... Guess not. *continues watching Glee*

The Jeunésse dorée (F. Gendron)

The jeunesse dorée was a Thermidorian social movement. In the aftermath of Robespierre’s fall, a baroque social type appeared in Paris, of which Carle Venet made a caricature that remained classic: the bicorn hat in the form of a half-moon, the powdered wig, the black collar, the cravate « écrouélique », the tight clothing with wide peaked lapels, the enormous monocle and the leaden staff. To these eccentrics, which feigned to speak by making the R disappear (« Ma pa-ole d'honneu-, c'est ho–ible! »), one gave the names Muscadins, Incroyables, Collets noirs, Army of Fréron and Jeunesse dorée. They were young people of chicanery and of small business —courtauds of boutiques and skip-kennels — most of them rebellious conscripts who had taken refuge in the public administrations, and which the Thermidorians — including Rovère — began to organise in gangs in order to oppose them to the « terrorists ». The Jeunesse dorée soon began to have its leaders: Jullian, Méchin and Martainville ; its rallying point: the Café de Chartres in the Palais-Égalité, today the Grand Véfour ; and its journal: The orator of the people by Fréron, from where it took its orders. Then, it exerted a considerable reactionary pressure on French political life, the first fights supporting on the street which the Thermidorian party, still timid and indecisive, fought in the Convention, and organising the conquest of « public opinion » by moderate ideology. In public places, it hunted down the Jacobins and urged the closing of their club. Later, it intervened in the sections which, one after another, fell into the hands of moderates while the public administrations and weapon manufacturers de-sansculottised themselves. In reaction to the austerity of Year II, the Collets noirs became the pillars of mundane life, fastidious and corrupted, which was reborn in the salons. While new elites appeared, personifying the current values, the symbolism of Year II fell apart: Marat was expelled from the Panthéon, the plays and actors of Year II were banished from the theatre and the festival of Year II, conceived as a republican celebration, turned thoroughly anti-Jacobin. Thus came into being the degradation of the Convention which only freed itself from Jacobin domination in order to fall under the one of the Jeunesse dorée. Through the cheerful debauchery and the shameless luxury which they displayed in front of the eyes of the severe and miserable little people, through the debasement of the currency which they brought forward by speculating frantically on public effects, by their patriotic blasphemies towards popular cults, by their insolent voyoucratie in public places, the young people catalysed the insurrectional dynamism of the popular masses. It was indeed amidst clashes that the popular political conscience ripened and that the mobilisation of the masses was prepared ; at a time where on waited for the process of the « four great culprits », while attempts of reconciliation, as curious as they were utopian, between « workers » and young people failed. On 12 Germinal, while the first famine riot erupted, the Assembly only escaped the wrath of the  « slaughterers » through the — late — intervention of the Jeunesse dorée. On 1 Prairial, stationed like the Praetorian guard of the Convention, it dispersed upon the first assault of the insurgents and only returned much later this day in order to expel the last rioters from the hall. Used as informers on 2 Prairial, the Muscadins were armed on the evening of 3 Germinal, then launched against the Faubourg Antoine on the 4th, from where they returned humiliated and defeated, only having escaped the massacre through a miracle. After all, the Jeunesse dorée had only played a role of provocation in the events of Prairial. It was the troop and the National Guard from Western France which had decided everything. The young people then obtained arrests in fifteen sections and in the military tribunal, and decided several sentences by their noisy cabal. Once the sans-culottes were swept from the political scene, the Jeunesse dorée was not more than a anarchic militia whose cumbersome tutelage the Convention sought to shake. The Café des Chartres was closed and while the deputies, through decrees enforced by a two-thirds majority, established themselves within political feudalism in order to stay in power, the Jeunesse dorée, frustrated in its political ambitions, contested their legislative mandate. This was the insurrection of Vendémiaire, and the army decided in favour of the Assembly. Henceforth, the Muscadins were only a protest of elegance in a guerre en dentelles. In total, the Jeunesse dorée, wherein one can see the political and social antithesis of sans-culotterie, initially appeared as a political tool used by the Thermidorians in order to advance the Reaction. Later, it became one of the moving elements of the Reaction, leading the deputies beyond their political project. Being the private militia of the Committee of General Security in the beginning, in later became one of the essential principles of reactionary dynamism and one of the central explanations of the Thermidorian phenomenon.

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“I didn’t mean anything I said” Hermione Imagine

Requested:  A female Slytherin with bad ass, crazy and sarcastic personality capture Hermione attention and makes her falling with the reader?

Word Count: 353

Warnings: not really a warning but it’s girl x girl

Y/N = your name

Y/L/N = your last name

A/N: First Girl x Girl! I hope you enjoy it!


Draco and I were in Charms when Hermione walked in.

“I dare you to write something nasty on a note and throw it at her.” Draco whispered.

I scribbled “Dirty Mudblood” on a note and quickly threw it at her head before I returned to finishing the homework so she didn’t think it was me.

The class passed with relative ease until I heard Seamus say “Y/N’s hot and all but if you want to date someone who looks like a cross between a Bicorn and a Chicken then ask her out.”

I got up from my seat and yelled “What did you say I looked like Finnegan? Why don’t you go set your house on fire like you set everything else on fire every year. Say one more bloody thing and your teeth will be kicked in.”

“Miss Y/L/N please leave the room and go to McGonagall’s office.” Professor Flitwick yelled from the front of the room.

“Oh, am I disturbing your class Professor FLATDICK?! This class was a bloody joke anyway.”

“Granger, escort her to McGonagall’s office.”

“Why me professor Flitwick?” Hermione asked annoyingly.

“Just bring her Miss Granger!”

Hermione got up in a huff and lightly stomped her way to the door where I was and grabbed my arm and forced me to go with her.

“You know, you’re really cute when you’re angry.” I said with a smirk and Hermione stopped in her tracks.

“What did you just say?” She asked, starting to blush.

“I said “You look cute when you’re angry.””

“Why are you like this? Why are you rude?”

“I don’t know, I guess I feel the need to assert dominance above everyone.” I chuckled a little bit.

“How does Draco feel about that?”

“Puh-lease, I have that boy wrapped around my finger. He obeys me.”

“Okay…Why did you say I was cute?”

“Because..you are. I’ve sort of developed a crush on you on the first day.”

“Well… I *mumbles*”

“You what? Speak up a little darlin’.” I said with a wink.

“I like you too…”

“Ah! Glad I’m not the only one who feels this way!”


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