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Anna Baltzer : Israel uses Palestinian Human Shields !  

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Jannie Baltzer 2015 Assortment – Outdated World Wedding Equipment


We’ve been fans of Jannie Baltzer’s work for quite some time right here at Wedding ceremony Sparrow HQ so when superb film photographer Sandra Åberg Photography sent over the most current collection, we had been overjoyed to see the elegance hitting stores for 2015. Full of previous world charm, this new bridal selection is best for the fine artwork bride. Artisanal beauty ideal for that heirloom piece to pass down for generations…

“Jannie Baltzers 2015 collection is inspired by previous globe charm, 1920’s Paris and will take area in a lovely chic trashed Parisian apartment – exactly where you can really feel the mood from days gone by. This beautiful bride is obtaining married, and she is dancing barefoot and content on the outdated floor in delicate dresses striving on different couture headpieces. To emphasize this mood I have utilized rose gold, honey-gold, antique gold, silver, cream and ivory Preciosa crystals. In this collection I have also utilized stunning opulent oversized Preciosa crystals in silver to add a touch of glamour to the assortment. All headpieces and veils are handmade with enjoy at our studio in Copenhagen. We ship around the world by way of Jannie Baltzer and also have two beautiful merchants in England, Carina B Couture & Luella’s Boudoir.“


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography


Sandra Åberg Photography

Vendor specifics

Photography: Sandra Åberg Photography | Accessories: Jannie Baltzer’s 2015 collection | Film Lab: United kingdom Film Lab | Hair & Make Up: Mia Jeppson | Dresses: Vintage Bride & BHLDN | Model: Faye from Le Management

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Posted in: Bridal, Bridals, Bridesmaids, Hair & Make Up, Inspiration, Actual Weddings, Design, Styled shoots, Weddings Tags: 1920s wedding equipment, Greatest Wedding ceremony Site, Bridal add-ons, Bridal headpieces, Bridals, bridesmaids, Dress, Fashion, Movie, Fine art photography, Jannie Baltzer, Luxury bridal equipment, Styled Shoot, Veils, Vintage

The Missouri History Museum’s Palestine Exception: A case study on how the St. Louis Jewish establishment exercises power & privilege

Frances Levine, president of the Missouri History Museum - See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/05/establishment-exercises-privilege#sthash.ylu4rLcC.dpuf


Anna Baltzer and Michael Berg on May 19, 2015

We recently had an opportunity to see how Jewish establishment groups in St. Louis exercise power in an attempt to control public discussions on Palestine/Israel. It was quite informative and is worth looking at in detail.

In March, the Missouri History Museum canceled a planned presentation with fewer than two days’ notice. The presentation, entitled “From Ferguson to Ayotzinapa to Palestine: Solidarity and Collaborative Action,” was organized by the Washington University student group AltaVoz. Although the program had been scheduled for over six weeks, and advertised for nearly two weeks on the official museum website, Museum Director Frances Levine personally made the decision to stop the event as planned. Articles in the St. Louis Jewish Light and email records given to St. Louis Jewish Voice for Peace in response to a Sunshine (FOIA) request to the public institution help illuminate the details of what happened.

Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC) Executive Director Batya Abramson-Goldstein wrote to Levine shortly before she canceled the event, expressing concern about the inclusion of Palestinian voices on the panel. Abramson-Goldstein claimed to be worried about how to answer to people who were writing to her and what to tell both the Jewish Federation and the Board of the JCRC, which was meeting that day. During the course of the day, both Levine and History Museum Managing Director of Community Education and Events Melanie Adams communicated multiple times about the situation with Abramson-Goldstein as well as Anti-Defamation League (ADL) Regional Director Karen Aroesty.

The Museum put out a statement claiming that “the issue was never with talking about Palestine. The issue was with adding a third topic to the discussion.” This statement was a lie. The museum did not tell the students that one of the three issues must be removed. Talking about Palestine was the problem, as revealed by this email from Adams to Abramson-Goldstein:

“am still waiting to hear back from the student. At this point I have given them two options. Remove the Palestine group from the program or find another location. Based on their initial response I think they are going to find another location. I will let you know when I hear from him.”

Levine states in the Jewish Light interview that the JCRC Director never directly asked her to do anything, but that she decided on her own to take action once Abramson-Goldstein brought the issue to her attention. This statement ignores the power dynamics at play given the extensive links between the History Museum, the Jewish Federation and Frances Levine.

At least five members of the Missouri History Museum’s Board of Trustees either have served on the Board of Directors or have been major donors of the Jewish Federation, which funds JCRC. The Jewish Federation and the JCRC have close ties with the State of Israel and they openly see one of their core missions as defending Israel from criticism.

The Jewish Federation also funds the Jewish Light, which has published no fewer than four glowing pieces by or about Levine — who is herself Jewish — in the one year that she has lived in St. Louis. The most recent piece gave her space to present her views on the recent controversy with the panel, where she explained her decision this way:

“By the time I saw it on March 17, my concerns were: Have we lost that first message? Have we lost that message of community policing in Ferguson? And the student protests over Ayotzinapa. Those are two terrible tragedies. And, could we bring it back to that?”

Levine is able to recognize the predatory and racially biased criminal justice system of Ferguson as a tragedy. She is able to see the massacre of students in Mexico as a tragedy. But somehow when Palestinians deal for sixty-seven years with the theft of their land and water, house demolitions, military detention of children with no due process, extrajudicial assassinations, military checkpoints, the uprooting of their crops, the degradation of their culture, and the turning of their cities into walled ghettos, this does not also count as a tragedy.

She then says, “I could understand the timeliness of Ayotzinapa, but I felt like the Palestinian voices needed their own [forum, with a] plurality of voices.”

On the exact same day that Levine demanded the removal of Palestinian voices from the panel, Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu was reelected after a high-profile campaign in which he promised never to accept a Palestinian state while appealing to the racism of Jewish Israelis by explicitly portraying the phenomenon of Palestinians inside Israel using their right to vote as an existential threat. This is the context in which Levine claimed that the issue wasn’t timely enough.

And what does Levine mean when she says that a forum on Palestine needs a “plurality of voices”? We get a good sense of this by looking at the emails obtained from the Sunshine request and by comparing and contrasting the museum’s handling of the solidarity panel with their protocol for other programs.

Very shortly after canceling the students’ program, Adams writes to Aroesty of the ADL (which in 2011 paid for then St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch to go to Israel to learn about “counter-terrorism” from Israeli police and military):

“In light of the current situation, we would like to plan a program that looks at the history of Palestine and Israel. We would like to work with the ADL and the JCRC to put something together in connection with State of Deception (a program related to the Holocaust and Nazism). Is this something you are open to doing? If so I will try to set up a meeting next week.”

Levine then decides that she and Adams need to have lunch or coffee with the JCRC and the ADL, from whom she seeks guidance on which Palestinians will be part of their new program. Adams writes to Levine:

“This is a discussion with Batya (from the JCRC) and Karen (from the ADL) to help shape the program. Karen said she has some suggestions from the Palestinian side. I am happy to get the suggestions and invite them as well. I do see this probably taking more than one meeting.”

To sum up: the History Museum decided that it is unacceptable for Palestinians to choose the context in which they speak about their struggle for justice. Instead, the leaders of two groups with close ties to the State of Israel are to meet with the leadership of the History Museum to plan the details of a new panel where a Palestinian may speak. Any Palestinian who is to speak will first needed to be vetted by the leadership of these pro-Israel organizations.

Let’s do a thought experiment. Let’s pretend the museum had a Palestinian president and multiple Palestinian donors and board members who defended violence against Jewish Israelis. Let’s pretend the president of this publicly funded museum refused to allow a Jewish Israeli to speak about her experience on a planned panel because it was not tragic or timely enough. How do you think the Jewish Federation, the Jewish Community Relations Council and the Anti-Defamation League would react? Would they be asking for a new director?

This scenario could never happen. There are no Palestinian groups with this kind of access to power within public institutions, let alone Palestinian groups with explicit ties to illegal activities in the way that the Jewish Federation, JCRC, and ADL are openly tied to Israel’s illegal policies of colonization and ethnic cleansing (in the words of Israeli historians).

This impossible scenario is the exact mirror image of what actually happened, and what happens all the time to Palestinians around the world, including in St. Louis. Many of us at Jewish Voice for Peace were surprised by the museum’s actions, but local Palestinians were not surprised at all. For the Jewish Federation, JCRC, ADL, and institutions and individuals aligned with them — public and private, progressive and conservative — silencing Palestinian voices is business as usual. And when Palestinian voices cannot be silenced, they are paired with Israelis to give the illusion of balance, reinforcing the idea that Palestinian narratives cannot be trusted, that they are incomplete and unworthy without an Israeli to balance them out, to legitimize them.

When the History Museum brought Michelle Alexander to speak about The New Jim Crow, did they invite Rush Limbaugh to ensure a “plurality of voices”? When the museum does forums on women’s rights and feminism, do they make sure no woman speaks without a man next to her to keep things proper? When the museum planned the upcoming State of Deception Holocaust program, did they look for an SS perspective to balance it out? When Levine’s staff approved the panel with speakers from Ayotzinapa, did they insist on getting representatives of the Mexican government and drug lords?

It is only with Palestinians that such “plurality of voices” is required. We must recognize that this insistence on coupling Palestinian narratives with Jewish ones — no matter what the Jewish perspective –is rooted in racism. We must recognize that denying Palestinians agency over telling their own stories — rather than have them told by a person chosen by their oppressor — is a form of violence. We must recognize the behavior of the JCRC — expressing displeasure in a top-down manner about a student program and seeking reassurance from the director that it was being taken care of — as firmly rooted in white privilege. It is this same racism, violence, and white privilege that we all need to resist – from Ferguson to Ayotzinapa to Palestine.



http://mondoweiss.net/2015/05/establishment-exercises-privilege#sthash.ylu4rLcC.dpuf

Review: My Heart & Other Black Holes by Jasmine Wanga

Source: Library
Publisher: Baltzer + Bray
Series: –
Edition: Hardcover, 302 Pages
Genre: Young Adult Contemporary
Purchase: Amazon  / Barnes & Noble / Book Depository*
*I receive a small monetary kickback from Amazon purchases
Rating: 4/5

Sixteen-year-old physics nerd Aysel is obsessed with plotting her own death. With a mother who can barely look at her without wincing, classmates who whisper behind…

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Kitchen remodeling 101: Brush up on the basics


Have no fear - these six tips from Summer Baltzer, interior designer and former host of HGTV’s Design on a Dime will get you remodeling like a pro without losing your mind or breaking the bank.

Tip one: Breathe in. Breathe out. Break it down.

Before starting, take a deep breath and know that your project is going to turn out great. The key is to break your remodel down into manageable steps that you can wrap your head around: cabinets, counters, floors, paint and accessories. Although it can seem like a daunting process, there is no need to freak out.

Tip two: Identify the function of the room.

Take a second to think about how you use your kitchen. The best outcome is a kitchen that’s both beautiful and functional, so make sure you’re not getting caught up in just color swatches, paint samples and tile styles. Ask yourself a few simple questions: Who primarily uses the kitchen? How much foot traffic will there be? What are the main tasks occurring in the space? Pausing to think about how the space will be used helps you create a kitchen that works for your life.

Tip three: Make the space work for you.

If you are considering a new layout, first think about how you move around the kitchen. There’s nothing more frustrating than furiously trying to get dinner on the table for a group of friends when you can’t find anything or move around your kitchen with ease. Determine the types of stations you always use and what you need in each station. Add drawers or containers for utensils or herbs … anything you might need to quickly grab while standing in that place. If you can’t recreate your floor plan, sometimes it’s simply a matter of reorganizing. Don’t assume you’re stuck with what you’ve got.

Tip four: Understand the scope of your work.

Is this kitchen makeover going to involve a partial or complete demolition, or are you going to be implementing simple fixes that you can pull off in a weekend? The work you’re looking to do will determine whether or not you need to hire a contractor and apply for permits or, if it’s just you, bribe your friends and buy that bucket of paint. It’s often smartest to look to a trained professional to handle the trickier parts of a kitchen makeover. Hire contractors who carry insurance to deal with your electrical and plumbing issues, use a professional installer to replace that new countertop and keep in mind that you may void the warranty on items if you install them incorrectly.

Tip five: Make a budget.

Though not as much fun as picking colors and fixtures, having a clear idea of what you can afford is important. Determine your budget and consider funds for unanticipated issues such as mold or plumbing pitfalls. If you have enough in the budget to deal with problems as they arise, you’ll be less stressed and can complete the project without a hitch. Finally, consider eco-friendly and durable materials that can be more affordable, including reclaimed wood, low-VOC paints, and countertops made from recycled fibers such as Wilsonart HD High Definition Laminate that can give the look of granite at a fraction of the cost. They’ll keep more of the green in your kitchen and in your wallet. Learn more at www.wilsonart.com.

Tip six: Keep track of your paperwork.

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of remodeling a kitchen, but the business end of a makeover is just as important. Keep track of contracts, warranties, manuals and receipts. Numbers used to identify paint colors and finishes are important too. Having everything accessible in a “kitchen makeover file” will make it easy to call for repairs or even simple touch-up if need be.

Armed with the basics, you’ll be well-prepared to create a kitchen you love.
Kitchen remodeling 101: Brush up on the basics


Have no fear - these six tips from Summer Baltzer, interior designer and former host of HGTV’s Design on a Dime will get you remodeling like a pro without losing your mind or breaking the bank.

Tip one: Breathe in. Breathe out. Break it down.

Before starting, take a deep breath and know that your project is going to turn out great. The key is to break your remodel down into manageable steps that you can wrap your head around: cabinets, counters, floors, paint and accessories. Although it can seem like a daunting process, there is no need to freak out.

Tip two: Identify the function of the room.

Take a second to think about how you use your kitchen. The best outcome is a kitchen that’s both beautiful and functional, so make sure you’re not getting caught up in just color swatches, paint samples and tile styles. Ask yourself a few simple questions: Who primarily uses the kitchen? How much foot traffic will there be? What are the main tasks occurring in the space? Pausing to think about how the space will be used helps you create a kitchen that works for your life.

Tip three: Make the space work for you.

If you are considering a new layout, first think about how you move around the kitchen. There’s nothing more frustrating than furiously trying to get dinner on the table for a group of friends when you can’t find anything or move around your kitchen with ease. Determine the types of stations you always use and what you need in each station. Add drawers or containers for utensils or herbs … anything you might need to quickly grab while standing in that place. If you can’t recreate your floor plan, sometimes it’s simply a matter of reorganizing. Don’t assume you’re stuck with what you’ve got.

Tip four: Understand the scope of your work.

Is this kitchen makeover going to involve a partial or complete demolition, or are you going to be implementing simple fixes that you can pull off in a weekend? The work you’re looking to do will determine whether or not you need to hire a contractor and apply for permits or, if it’s just you, bribe your friends and buy that bucket of paint. It’s often smartest to look to a trained professional to handle the trickier parts of a kitchen makeover. Hire contractors who carry insurance to deal with your electrical and plumbing issues, use a professional installer to replace that new countertop and keep in mind that you may void the warranty on items if you install them incorrectly.

Tip five: Make a budget.

Though not as much fun as picking colors and fixtures, having a clear idea of what you can afford is important. Determine your budget and consider funds for unanticipated issues such as mold or plumbing pitfalls. If you have enough in the budget to deal with problems as they arise, you’ll be less stressed and can complete the project without a hitch. Finally, consider eco-friendly and durable materials that can be more affordable, including reclaimed wood, low-VOC paints, and countertops made from recycled fibers such as Wilsonart HD High Definition Laminate that can give the look of granite at a fraction of the cost. They’ll keep more of the green in your kitchen and in your wallet. Learn more at www.wilsonart.com.

Tip six: Keep track of your paperwork.

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of remodeling a kitchen, but the business end of a makeover is just as important. Keep track of contracts, warranties, manuals and receipts. Numbers used to identify paint colors and finishes are important too. Having everything accessible in a “kitchen makeover file” will make it easy to call for repairs or even simple touch-up if need be.

Armed with the basics, you’ll be well-prepared to create a kitchen you love.
Kitchen remodeling 101: Making the space your own


Here are five creative, thrifty and helpful tips from Summer Baltzer, interior designer and former host of HGTV’s Design on a Dime, to send you well on your way to a kitchen design that not only looks great in the long term, but also reflects you.

Tip one: Know your style.

Design your kitchen around colors and objects that make you feel great. This is the room you probably spend most of your time in whether you’re cooking, entertaining or just doing homework with the kids. Loving the look is important. Make your design meaningful and something you’ll want to see every day. Look for inspiration from a pottery collection, a piece of artwork, or even the food you love.

Tip two: Get creative on a budget.

A great way to save money is to repurpose found items for your accents where you can. Frame pictures from favorite recipes, use inexpensive flower pots or mason jars to store utensils and cutlery, repurpose an old console table as a center island. You might even want to spray-paint the old dining table and give it a new life. Look for salvaged floors, pallets or pottery to create new furniture pieces or accents. This approach not only saves you money, but also makes your kitchen enviably unique.

Tip three: Develop your vision.

Keep your ideas on track by collecting loose drawings; they can become your own personal design board. They don’t have to be professional or even exactly like the finished product - just enough to make your point and start to envision what the finished product will look like. Seeing your ideas come together before taking a sledgehammer to your old tile not only gets you excited about your project, but can also save you from making design decisions that don’t fit your vision. If you’re hiring a professional, plans for the kitchen should be included in the cost. Make sure that they fit your vision and that you’re getting everything you need from your new space before demo and installation begin.

Tip four: Create timeless beauty.

When focusing on your large installed items, don’t just concentrate on what’s popular now. Instead, take a look at the items that have been relevant for more than a decade. If you’re designing a kitchen for a home you plan on living in for the next 20 years, by all means, go crazy and embrace colors and patterns that make you happy. But if you don’t plan on staying there forever, give yourself room to grow. Look to classic color combinations like white, black or gray cabinets; stone countertops with white or walnut cabinets; or butcher block with just about any cabinet color you can imagine. Wilsonart’s Calcutta Marble and new Old Mill Oak and Truss Maple are affordable laminate options that look real but are made from recycled wood fibers. They have finishes that withstand daily wear and tear, and are a fraction of the cost of traditional stone countertops. Look to lasting styles and materials, rather than what’s simply trendy at the moment, to create a timelessly beautiful kitchen. Learn more at www.wilsonart.com.

Tip five: Start with simplicity.

Keep the lines of your installed, more permanent items clean and simple. To add style and versatility, get creative with your accents. For instance, try going Shaker with your cabinets. Traditional cup pull handles will move them in a more classic and traditional direction and linear pull handles will take you down a modern road. By keeping your appliances and more permanent items simple, and using your accents to create a sense of style, you’ll open up tons of design doors for yourself, creating a kitchen that transitions easily, keeps up with your style and has staying power.

With this timeless know-how and creative inspiration, you’re ready to create a kitchen you’ll love both now and a decade down the road.
Kitchen remodeling 101: Brush up on the basics


Have no fear - these six tips from Summer Baltzer, interior designer and former host of HGTV’s Design on a Dime will get you remodeling like a pro without losing your mind or breaking the bank.

Tip one: Breathe in. Breathe out. Break it down.

Before starting, take a deep breath and know that your project is going to turn out great. The key is to break your remodel down into manageable steps that you can wrap your head around: cabinets, counters, floors, paint and accessories. Although it can seem like a daunting process, there is no need to freak out.

Tip two: Identify the function of the room.

Take a second to think about how you use your kitchen. The best outcome is a kitchen that’s both beautiful and functional, so make sure you’re not getting caught up in just color swatches, paint samples and tile styles. Ask yourself a few simple questions: Who primarily uses the kitchen? How much foot traffic will there be? What are the main tasks occurring in the space? Pausing to think about how the space will be used helps you create a kitchen that works for your life.

Tip three: Make the space work for you.

If you are considering a new layout, first think about how you move around the kitchen. There’s nothing more frustrating than furiously trying to get dinner on the table for a group of friends when you can’t find anything or move around your kitchen with ease. Determine the types of stations you always use and what you need in each station. Add drawers or containers for utensils or herbs … anything you might need to quickly grab while standing in that place. If you can’t recreate your floor plan, sometimes it’s simply a matter of reorganizing. Don’t assume you’re stuck with what you’ve got.

Tip four: Understand the scope of your work.

Is this kitchen makeover going to involve a partial or complete demolition, or are you going to be implementing simple fixes that you can pull off in a weekend? The work you’re looking to do will determine whether or not you need to hire a contractor and apply for permits or, if it’s just you, bribe your friends and buy that bucket of paint. It’s often smartest to look to a trained professional to handle the trickier parts of a kitchen makeover. Hire contractors who carry insurance to deal with your electrical and plumbing issues, use a professional installer to replace that new countertop and keep in mind that you may void the warranty on items if you install them incorrectly.

Tip five: Make a budget.

Though not as much fun as picking colors and fixtures, having a clear idea of what you can afford is important. Determine your budget and consider funds for unanticipated issues such as mold or plumbing pitfalls. If you have enough in the budget to deal with problems as they arise, you’ll be less stressed and can complete the project without a hitch. Finally, consider eco-friendly and durable materials that can be more affordable, including reclaimed wood, low-VOC paints, and countertops made from recycled fibers such as Wilsonart HD High Definition Laminate that can give the look of granite at a fraction of the cost. They’ll keep more of the green in your kitchen and in your wallet. Learn more at www.wilsonart.com.

Tip six: Keep track of your paperwork.

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of remodeling a kitchen, but the business end of a makeover is just as important. Keep track of contracts, warranties, manuals and receipts. Numbers used to identify paint colors and finishes are important too. Having everything accessible in a “kitchen makeover file” will make it easy to call for repairs or even simple touch-up if need be.

Armed with the basics, you’ll be well-prepared to create a kitchen you love.