Baltimore history

Trackwomen, 1943. Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company

Series: Women Working In Industry, 1940 - 1945. Record Group 86: Records of the Women’s Bureau, 1892 - 1995

March is Women’s History Month! Women have shaped this country’s history in more ways than we can count. Long before Rosie the Riveter joined the war effort in the 1940s, women earned wages to support themselves and their families. This series of posts celebrates the diversity of women’s labor, ranging from industry to agriculture to folklore and beyond. 

This archival series (Women Working In Industry, 1940 - 1945) contains images depicting women and their contributions to the war effort during World War II. The photographs show women for the first time on a mass scale and from every social and economical background preforming jobs that have been traditionally considered as men’s work. In addition to the clerical and secretarial fields, women are seen working in the aircraft industry, the metal industry, ordnance, the railroad, the shipyards, as well as the military services. There are approximately 94 different occupations shown in this series where women were performing the work.


This month’s Women’s History series comes via Nora Sutton, one of our interns from the Department of State’s Virtual Student Foreign Service (VSFS) program. Nora is finishing her Master’s in Public History at West Virginia University this semester.

There were a wide variety of opinions about the statues [with Confederate ties] and about how we should remember Baltimore’s complicated situation during the Civil War and how we should remember the Jim Crow era here. Really, those statues are products of the Jim Crow era and not the Civil War.
— 

University of Baltimore history professor Elizabeth Nix

Baltimore Took Down Confederate Monuments. Now It Has To Decide What To Do With Them

What NFL Team's Name Has A Unique Origin?

The Baltimore Ravens football team! It is the only team in the history of the National Football League to be named after the title of a poem: “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe. While Poe was not from Baltimore, he lived there for short periods. And in 1849 he died there while visiting the city. (The last place he was seen alive, a bar, is still open today!)

If you’re in the Baltimore area this September, be sure to check out the amazing Michal Roxie Johnson in this wonderful one-woman show written by Tim Hogan about Pharaoh Hatshepsut, one of history’s most enigmatic rulers. #FemaleKing #AmbitionIsDivine (at Baltimore, Maryland)