Astro-photography

The shot shows a faint winter Milky Way and Orion setting on a cold January night in the Jersey Pine Barrens. I was the only person in the entire forest that night…well unless you believe in the Jersey Devil…

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White holes

White holes are hypothetically the complete opposite of a black hole; nothing can enter it. They appear in the theory of Eternal Black holes. Einstein field equations would position white holes in the past which is also the opposite of black hole regions placed in the future. The white hole shares the same properties as matter. It has a gravitational pull but objects traveling towards it would never reach the event horizon. The white hole event horizon in the past becomes a black hole event horizon in the future thus any object heading to the event horizon for the white hole will eventually end up on the event horizon on the black hole. Stephen Hawking made the argument that because black holes can be in a time-reversal-invariant state, this would imply that black holes and white holes are the same object. The Hawking radiation from the black hole is identified being emitted from the white hole.

There is much much more to white holes than this and many different theories. I like the idea of a white hole being the output for the black hole forming an Einstein-Rosen bridge. However, there are currently no known processes for how white holes are formed, they are not like a black hole which is formed from the collapse of a very large object.

A great paper to help you understand one of the current white hole theories is found on thins like http://arxiv.org/vc/arxiv/papers/1105/1105.2776v1.pdf

DAILY LIGHT LEAK: Vast

Location: Big Sur, CA.

Settings: 16 shots at F3.5, iso 3200, 30 second exposures.

No light paintings this time around, and I anticipate a bit more digging through the archives as this storm in LA continues. Case in point, this panorama of the milky way I shot in November of 2013. It’s impossible not to look up at the sky during a night like this and not wonder what else is out there amongst the galaxies in such clear view but so distant and unknown to civilization. (via DARIUS TWIN)