Art-education

Here is 10 things I tell my students on the first day of class about building yourself up into being a artist. This is starting point, not a all encompassing list. Hope you find it helpful!

1. Never stop experimenting. When you stop trying new things your style will get stagnant. Developing your style never has an stopping point, you’re going to continue learning and changing–that is a good thing.

2. Don’t draw to please a particular person or audience. It is tempting to draw something you think the person viewing it will like. It starts with drawing to please a friend/family member, then a teacher, and then a wider audience online or in person. However, consider drawing to please yourself first, an audience will follow in time and you will face a lot less burn out down the line. You’ll be hired for this, work you made out of something you liked crafting–not something you forced yourself to craft. Don’t make art that makes you miserable.

3. Learn the basics. Get good at anatomy (human and animal), perspective, creating depth, lighting, etc–then break the rules you’ve learned. Work, no matter how abstract, pushed, and pulled is always stronger when informed by a mastery of the basics.

4. Practice working in ways that do not hurt your hand. Learn to draw with a relaxed hand and draw in long strokes. Both of these methods help prevent issues with your hand, wrist, and arm. I’ve never gotten carpal tunnel, and I draw on a daily basis, because I have learned how to treat my hand well. Your hand is your tool, if you wear it out there isn’t a new one you can just pick up. The best treatment for any possible physical issues is prevention.

5. Learn how to draw without erasing. It is scary and it is tough no doubt! However the best way to become more confident is through not erasing. There is a medium for everyone to try this out, whether it is pen or non-erasing colored pencils. If you want to ease yourself into this method try out Pentel red lead, it erases a bit–but overall will always leave a mark with every stroke you make. The importance of this is learning to not be afraid of mistakes.

6. Draw from life, from reference photos, and from imagination. This trio is important, combining all three is usually how you build great drawing skills. Drawing from life gives you the ability to capture small details that you’ll remember to put in when drawing from a reference photo, drawing from refs will give you the practice you’ll need to handle whatever subject so that one day you can draw it from your own imagination–see how that works?

7. You’re art isn’t completely unique and that is okay. I can’t emphasis how many people I know who have gotten so hung up on being something totally unique that they burn out fast and never make work again. Now, considering how much art is in the world there is no way that what you create will be 100% unique to you. That is fine, your personality in your work is more of what makes something yours than a “style”.

8. Figure out your work’s personality. On that note finding the personality of your art is important as you go into trying to build your own place in the art world. The personality of a piece is a combination of style, subject, color, shapes, lines, and maybe most important themes (yes subject and themes are different). This combo is what makes your art special. At a loss for where to start figuring out your own personality? Compile a list of 10 artists you love. Why do you love them? Is it the shapes of one artist that speak to you, the line work of another is beautiful, the themes of a third make you feel inspired? Now take the 10 things you love about those 10 artists and start applying them to your own work. This isn’t about copying these artists, it is about the inspiration. That line work you love in another artist’s piece is gunna look different in yours for example. Those themes from another artist, well when you take them on your life might inform them in a opposite way. In time your inspired work will evolve into something that is your own.

9. Talent is nice, persistence is more important. Someone may be naturally talented in some areas of art, however someone who is persistent in their craft is so much more likely to succeed. Effort, continued growth, and practice will add up to so much more in the long run than just skating by on “talent”.

10. Be a good person. Treat others with respect, learn about social issues, don’t be a creep, and use your art to help people. And this might mean you craft a piece about an important issue that changes thousands of lives, or you might just be creating to help yourself get through the day. Both are important, after all you are a person too and you should always be trying to help and be kind to yourself.

I made this years ago and taped it above my drawing table to remind me that not every drawing I make is going to be good and that’s ok. Remember that for every good drawing you see, especially on social media, there are thousands of bad ones that led up to it. The crazy thing is that even as you get better there’ll always be something that frustrates you and the only way to get through it is to draw draw draw!

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Happy Birthday Agnes Martin and Yayoi Kusama!

Both pioneering artists, both born on this day, and both featured in MoMA’s newest free online course, “In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting.” It wasn’t easy for these women to make a place for themselves in the male-dominated postwar New York art world. But they persisted—with Kusama claiming that she wanted nothing less than to “start a new art movement”—and became some of the foremost artists of their day. Enroll today to learn about the materials, techniques, and approaches of Martin, Kusama, and five other New York School artists. Sign up at mo.ma/coursera today!

[Agnes Martin. With My Back to the World. 1997. Synthetic polymer paint on canvas, six panels. Fractional and promised gift of Michael and Judy Ovitz. © 2017 Estate of Agnes Martin/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Yayoi Kusama. Accumulation. 1952. Ink on paperboard. The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection Gift (purchase, and gift, in part, of The Eileen and Michael Cohen Collection). © 2017 Yayoi Kusama]

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In my previous lessons I taught you guys how to draw the figure. I showed you how to add muscles and look for those intricate subtleties that will make any figure drawing look professional. But looking back I realized that I totally skimmed over one of the most important parts of the body. Hands are extremely expressive, second only to the face. They’re powerful supporting actors that help carry the story of your narrative. Hands can make or break a drawing. So, it’s crucial to learn the proper way to draw hands. I’ll go over the easiest way to draw hands in this lesson ;)

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Michael Carini | Foreverandever | Acrylic on Canvas | 60" x 96" | 2014

The Carini Technique-As every story has a past, present, and future, what may at first glimpse appear to be non-objective abstraction is in fact segmentations of energetic imagery interacting through the boundlessness of space and time.

In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting

MoMA’s newest free online course, “In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting,” has begun, and registration ends tomorrow! Taught by conservator, art historian, and artist Corey D’Augustine, the course combines studio demonstrations, walkthroughs of MoMA’s galleries, close visual analysis of paintings in the collection, and art historical insight to introduce you to seven New York School artists—Barnett Newman, Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Agnes Martin, Ad Reinhardt, and Yayoi Kusama. Says D’Augustine: “The more you know about how a painting is done, the more you can recreate the artist’s own perspective and intention, the more you can understand it.” Sign up at mo.ma/inthestudio.

[Mark Rothko. No. 16 (Red, Brown, and Black). 1958. Oil on canvas. Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund. © 2017 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

See-Saw

Teaching goes back and forth a lot. Good things, bad, good, bad. Love, hate.


First period today within the first 15 minutes of class, a student told me, “Suck my asshole.”

The next period was my advanced photoshop kids. I taught them all last year, and they learned and grew so much. When the bell rang and I said, “Welcome to advanced digital palette!” the ENTIRE class started cheering and applauding. Because they were so excited… and they love me that much.




A class of 32 CHEERED AND CLAPPED FOR ME. Hands down, best moment of my career so far.

Ivy In Winter; View From My Mother’s Kitchen Window, Sandusky Ohio 2008

Limited edition 8x10 archival print up for auction today April 7 at Stivers School for the Arts in Dayton Ohio. Stivers is a public magnet school, grades 7-12. This auction benefits the photography program.

If I myself hadn’t gone to a high school with an advanced art & photography program, I might not have known that I was meant to pursue a career in photography. Kids need art programs! Consider contributing to a local arts program if you can.

Maurice Utrillo

Sacre-Coeur de Montmartre, 1937, gouache on paper mounted on canvas, 27 x 21 inches, Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Maurice Utrillo is best known for his views of Paris. This painting offers a glimpse of the famous church of Sacre-Coeur (Sacred Heart), identified by the immense white dome at the end of the narrow street. The church is the most familiar building of Montmartre, the artistic quarter on the north side of Paris that Utrillo frequented.
Utrillo suffered from alcoholism and mental disorders and was encouraged to paint by his mother, the artist Suzanne Valadon, who was his only teacher.