ArmoryShow

Your Armory Show headline of the day: from the New York American, Feb. 20, 1913. The article continues with a quote from a patron to the exhibit who makes this observation of a Francis Picabia painting (possibly Dances at the Spring): “The whole thing reminds me of a cat having fits in a patch of tomatoes.”

From page 105 of Walt Kuhn scrapbook of press clippings documenting the Armory Show, vol. 1, 1913. Walt Kuhn, Kuhn family papers, and Armory Show records, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

For more on the Armory Show, visit our dedicated site: armoryshow.si.edu

Your Armory Show Headline of the Day: from the New York Sun, Mar. 16, 1913. After a month at the 69th Regiment Armory and over 100,000 visitors, the exhibit packed up and doors were officially closed on Mar. 17th. Next stop: Chicago.

Page 147 of Walt Kuhn’s scrapbook of press clippings documenting the Armory Show, vol. 2, 1913. Walt Kuhn, Kuhn family papers, and Armory Show records, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

For more on the Armory Show, visit our dedicated site: armoryshow.si.edu

I say potay-to diggers, you say potah-to diggers. On our blog we have a new post dedicated to this painting which has gone by varying names since Van Gogh painted it in 1890, alternately The Laborers, The Potato Diggers, or The Weeders, as it is now known (painting is currently in the collection of the Foundation E. G. Bührle). Primary sources in our Walt Kuhn papers helped scholar Laurette E. McCarthy to identify this as one of the pieces exhibited at the 1913 Armory Show.

For more on the Armory Show, visit our dedicated site: armoryshow.si.edu