Argyll-and-Sutherland

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I have always liked this particular stripe pattern. I knew there had to be a proper name for it. Remembering, thanks to a recent post by thesuitroom I jumped to The University of Google Search to learn more.

The Brooks A&S piece above I thrifted months back. The other three variations are recent finds. They look interesting together and though I’m not a visual artist, I thought I would snap some artsy photos. I must have been subliminally inspired since I have seen a number of repp tie collection photos like this recently. 

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First World War Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders uniform on display at the Argyll and Sutherland Regiment museum in Stirling Castle

This belonged to Private William Taylor (later promoted to sergeant) who was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his actions during the battle of Arras in 1917.

Kilts were still a big part of Highland regimental uniform but they had learnt in the Boer War to cover the tartan with khaki to make it more camouflaged. However up until the introduction of the Brodie helmet in the later years of the war many regiments wore the Glengarry (seen here) and the Balmoral Bonnet.

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Thrifted 04.02.14

Polos: VV
Ties: BB, PRL, London
Radio: RCA

Polo shirts yadda yadda, ties, yadda, cotton, yadda, argyle and…THIS FUCKING RADIO!! Now, as you can probably tell this guy is not in working order. My girl and I were looking for one for her new spot. She’s rolling with the vintage-lots-of-old-wood steez. Ideally, one that was not working so we could gut it and slap a bluetooth speaker in it. Boom. Done.

Corner fragment of regimental colour for the 93rd Regiment of Foot on display at the Argyll and Sutherland Regiment museum at Stirling Castle

This is from the colours the 93rd carried in New Orleans from December 1814 to Febuary 1815 during what would be called the War of 1812.

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Officer’s Coatee and Sword of the 91st Argyllshire Regiment of Foot on display at the Argyll and Sutherland Regiment Museum in Stirling Castle

The officer’s coatee is from 1840 and unlike other highland regiments the officer’s of the 91st did not wear tartan. Instead they embroidered thistles to the back of the coatee skirts.

The sword was presented to Captain Dugald Campbell around 1809-1810. Dugald used the sword during the latter years of the Napoleonic War and in Jamaica where he was killed in battle in 1825.

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Service Dress Uniform of a Lewis Gunner in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders from the First World War on display at the Argyll and Sutherland Regiment museum in Stirling Castle

This belonged to Corporal Colin McNab a member of the Lewis Gunner team. Such soldiers were expected to carry their rifle, rifle ammunition, Lewis gun ammunition and spare parts for the Lewis gun along with the rest oftheir kit.

Kilts were still a big part of Highland regimental uniform but they had learnt in the Boer War to cover the tartan with khaki to make it more camouflaged. However up until the introduction of the Brodie helmet in the later years of the war many regiments wore the Glengarry and the Balmoral Bonnet (seen here).

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Officers uniform and helmet of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders from the First World War on display at the Argyll and Sutherland Regiment museum in Stirling Castle

This uniform has Oversees Service Chevrons and a Wound Stripe showing the officer was wounded during the war.

Kilts were still a big part of Highland regimental uniform but they had learnt in the Boer War to cover the tartan with khaki to make it more camouflaged. However up until the introduction of the Brodie helmet in the later years of the war many regiments wore the Glengarry and the Balmoral Bonnet.

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Tunic (with bullet holes) and badgerhead sporran from the Crimean War on display at the Argyll and Sutherland Regiment museum in Stirling Castle

This was worn by Sergeant David Philips at the battle of Alma in 1854 where he was seriously wounded by two musket balls to the chest. He survived these injuries but was medically invalided our of the army. Army invalids would have to survive often on the streets as the pensions for NCO’s and privates was not enough to keep them alive.

As a sergeant Philips wore the badgerhead sporran.