Anura

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Rough Skinned Green Treefrog, Hypsiboas cinerascens by Andreas Kay
Via Flickr:
from Ecuador: www.flickr.com/andreaskay/albums

Sudell’s Frog (Neobatrachus sudelli)

Also sometimes known as the “Painted Burrowing Frog”, a name also given to another member the genus Neobatrachus as well. Sudell’s frog is a species of Australian ground frog (Myobatrachidae) which is found on and west of the Great Dividing Range of New South Wales to western Victoria and southern Queensland as well as far eastern South Australia. Sudell’s frogs typically inhabit ponds, dams, ditches, and other areas of still water in woodland shrubland and even disturbed areas. They are also accomplished burrowers, spending large periods of time underground to avoid droughts. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Amphibia-Anura-Myobatrachidae-Neobatrachus-N. sudelli

Image: LiquidGhoul

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Red Snouted Treefrog, Scinax ruber by Andreas Kay
Via Flickr:
from Ecuador: www.flickr.com/andreaskay/albums

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Map Tree Frog, Hypsiboas geographicus by Andreas Kay
Via Flickr:
from Ecuador: www.flickr.com/andreaskay/albums

American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus - formerly Bufo americanus) slough

Like reptiles, amphibians shed their skins as they grow larger.

However, unlike reptiles, amphibians almost always consume their leftover moults. This serves hide their presence to predators, as well as to regain some of the calories lost during growth. As amphibians shed more often than reptiles, they lose far more of their available protein and carbohydrates to shed skin, and if they were to just leave it laying around, they’d be wasting calories that they didn’t need to let go of!

Amphibians and Reptiles of the Chicago Area. Clifford H. Pope, 1944.

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Black-spotted sticky frog (Kalophrynus pleurostigma) 

Picture by Kurt G (Orionmystery) , taken in Selangor, Malaysia.

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Sarayacu Treefrog baby, Dendropsophus sarayacuensis by Andreas Kay
Via Flickr:
from Reserva Ecologica Tamandua, Ecuador: www.flickr.com/andreaskay/sets/72157671181153332