Another-Heart-Calls

Another Heart Calls
All American Rejects
Another Heart Calls

Another Heart CallsAll American Rejects

Do you remember when we didn’t care?
We were just two kids that took the moment when it was there
Do you remember you at all?
Another heart calls

Yeah, I remember when we stole the night
We’d lie awake but dreaming ‘til the sun would wash the sky
Just as soon as I’d see you, but didn’t I, but didn’t I tell you?
As deep as I need you, you wanna leave it all

What can I do? Say it’s true
Or everything that matters breaks in two
Say it’s true
I’ll never ask for anyone but you

Talk to me, I’m throwing myself in front of you
This could be the last mistake that I would ever wanna do
Yeah, all I ever do is give, it’s time you see my point of view

Just as soon as I’d see you, but didn’t I, but didn’t I tell you?
As deep as I need you, you wanna leave it all

What can I do? Say it’s true
Or everything that matters breaks in two
Say it’s true
I’ll never ask for anyone but you

But I know what you want is to figure it out
And god knows I do too
What can I do? Say it’s true
I’ll never ask for anyone but you

I’m sorry, so what!
But you don’t think I’ve said enough
I’m sorry, I don’t care!
You were never there

Just as soon as I see you but didn’t I, but didn’t I tell you?
As deep as I need you, you wanna leave it all

What can I do? Say it’s true
Or everything that matters breaks in two
Say it’s true
I’ll never ask for anyone but you

I know what you want is to figure it out
And god knows I do too
Yeah, what can I do? Say it’s true
I’ll never ask for anyone but you

I’ll never ask for anyone but you

I may have listened one too many times to a certain opening and all its countless remixes and versions while thinking about my sons like I always do.

Books of College (Semester Two)

The Waves by Virginia Woolf (for fun)

  • This is one of the most exquisitely written books I have ever read. It felt like poetry for all 297 pages. Every single sentence has the ability to make you marvel over the complexities of the English language. That being said, this book took me nearly six months to read, and it wasn’t for lack of time or anything. This novel is narrated by six voices of six friends (the book is not told as a normal story, but rather each character takes turns soliloquizing throughout the book). Despite the characters changing, the tone of the book remained consistent, which made it difficult for me to remember which character was which. Obviously it is meant to be experimental and not straightforward, but I think it may have gone a tad too far. This book is complex and beautiful, but there is no doubt it is confusing, even to the point of frustration sometimes. (3.25 / 5)

Frankenstein by Mary Shelly (for a class)

  • Upon sitting down to read this book, I, as many people, only knew of the very classic images of Frankenstein, and the very basic plot. Man creates a monster. I am delighted to say that the story is so much more than that. I enjoyed the fact that we get the point of view of not only Victor and his monster, but of Watson, for a slightly more objective view of the situation (although one could say he is simply a foil for Victor and therefore is also not entirely reliable). Simply put, I think this book has all of the components of a good, classic story. While the story focused primarily on Victor and his turmoil, the minor characters of Henry (my love), Elizabeth, and the father were delightful presences throughout. I also never really expected to get the monster’s point of view, and getting that for an entire section of the novel is incredibly thought-provoking, as it, in a weird way, attempts to humanize the monster. I don’t believe there is any part of this book I disliked, but it did not completely blow me away. (4.25 / 5)

Another Day by David Levithan (for fun)

  • This book wrecked me. I read Every Day four years ago, and while I remembered the basic plot, the characters have been out of my mind for ages, so diving back into their story was amazing. What is most successful about this book is the emotion, and the sheer force that that teenage love has in making a story enticing. One thing I did find was that A felt a little more off-putting in this book. When I originally read Every Day, his instantaneous inclination towards Rhiannon didn’t seem odd at all, but in this version it feels almost obsessive, and I would be freaked out if I were her. I actually think that difference makes this book more successful. It doesn’t just feel like Every Day retold in some shitty attempt. It truly feels like its own story - with more characterization of Rhiannon and clearly more Justin. The plot is also more romance-driven, seeing as we only get a brief mention of the Reverend Poole conflict towards the very end. Speaking of the end, I was a sobbing mess, which proves that it was effective. (4.5 / 5)

The Flick by Annie Baker (for fun)

  • Without a doubt, the best word to describe this book would be “raw.” There is nothing theatrical and nothing remotely unrealistic about this entire script, which I think is its strength. As a reader, I really felt like I was able to connect with the characters. Their anxieties were my anxieties, I felt every awkward pause, I felt every pain, and I even felt love in the rare occasions of compassion. I must say my favorite part of the play was Ezekiel 25:17, because even in the midst of this incredibly tense moment, there was light, which I think is a feeling Sam wants Avery to feel. I do think it took me leas time to read this play than it took to perform (around 3 hours, so I’ve heard), which seems very long. However, I cannot truly speak to its effectiveness as a performed play. All I can say for certain was that this was a very beautiful story to read even if not much happened. (4.25 / 5)

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness (for fun)

  • So, first off, I’m crying. I think this book was absolutely stunning. What made this a unique reading experience for me was that rarely did I feel as a reader; instead, every emotion I felt during this book I felt as if I was Conor. To elaborate, it didn’t feel like Patrick Ness was trying to write twists or plot for the sake of writing a novel. It simply felt like he was sharing a story, which makes it all the more heartbreaking. I don’t feel like I’m rooting for Conor as a character; I truly feel like I am Conor in this story. The base plot of this isn’t too unique: A boy’s mother is dying of cancer. The end is one of the most predictable endings of any book I have ever read, but that’s not what matters to this book. What matters is the journey of Conor’s acceptance, and it truly feels as if I have gone on that journey too. Also, the illustrations are gorgeous and enhance the plot immensely. I have yet to see the movie but now I really, really want to. (5 / 5)

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (for a class)

  • Sometimes a book with a lackluster plot can be enhanced by great characters. Sometimes a book with shitty characters can be forgiven because the plot is awesome. Unfortunately for Wuthering Heights, neither the plot nor the characters were compelling in the slightest. This book is riddled with unlikeable characters until perhaps the final ten pages. The book is incredibly racist without really addressing it, and it is incredibly sexist without attempting to fix it. You know how Severus Snape can be defended because in the end, he did good, and was on the right side of history? Like, he was still a horrible human, but at the very core, he had good intentions because of his love for Lily? Heathcliff is that, but JUST bad. He lost his love and then never did a single good deed in his entire life, and it’s insufferable. I frankly don’t understand why this is a classic that people love. I don’t give books 1 star lightly, but I genuinely did not enjoy this one bit. (1 / 5)

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (for a class)

  • Directly after reading this, I read Chinua Achebe’s essay about the book, which contained a sentence which stuck with me more than any of the actual novella: “White racism against Africa is such a normal way of thinking that its manifestations go completely unremarked.” Now, while reading the book, I already did not enjoy it. As a critic, sure I could find some valid aspects, but as simply a lover of reading, I was miserable. It was told in massive blocks of text which made it hard to stay focused, and frankly the story itself was never too compelling. The stakes were low because we knew Marlow was just chilling at the chronological Now of the story. Now as a critic, yeah, I think this book just perpetuates a certain kind of racism most white folk intrinsically have. Achebe also pointed out that having Africa as a mere backdrop to the story about these couple white dudes (Marlow and Kurtz) just hurts the cause because he doesn’t even take the time to develop any of the native people. So yeah, not only was it unenjoyable, but it was pretty damn problematic. (1 / 5)

The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Saenz (for fun)

  • I often think that a good book leaves you as a better person at the end. Upon finishing this novel, I want to be a better friend, I want to exude passion, I want to guard people from heartbreak. And I think that is beautiful. This covers all of the bases of an excellent Saenz novel: Believable and gorgeous characters, character relations that make your heartache, and a lack of any true plot or conflict yet you cannot put the book down because you need to know how this ends. You don’t hope the prince saves the princess, or the man slays the dragon, you simply wish for the characters what you wish for yourself: that at the end, they are better people. This novel is riddled with discussion of grief and death and belonging, and it is dense and heavy and it hurts my heart to read. But it is so beautiful. Whenever the novel felt dark, it had a way of finding the light: just like whistling in the dark. (5 / 5)

I Wrote This For You by pleasefindthis (for fun)

  • As a poet, as a writer, this book disappointed me. It is Tumblr inspiration, at best, and had no traces of poeticism. As an editor, a pretentious intellectual, this book angered me. It was impersonal and overgeneralized and the entire “Rain” section until the very end felt disingenuous. As a person with a human heart, this book was everything to me. Every page felt like someone - Haley, Griffin, Gabe, Mark, Kat, myself - and tugged on something intangible within me. This book is very little art, but it is all heart. (2.75 / 5)

Reveries of the Solitary Walker by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (for a class) (2 / 5)