Ancient-Egypt

4

On this day in history, July 31st, in 30 B.C. the Battle of Alexandria was fought between the forces of Marc Antony and Octavian. Though Antony’s side suffered a great many desertions he won the initial phase of the battle. The desertions kept continuing though, and Octavian won the second stage of the battle.

The following day, having retreated back to the palace, Antony received mistaken news that his wife, Cleopatra VII, had already taken her own life. He proceeded to fall on his sword, though he didn’t die immediately. He found out that she was still alive, hiding in her mausoleum. Antony was carried there and hauled up through a window to her, where he died in her arms.

stele of the Chantress of Amon, Tati-Isi, ca. 825–712 BCE; now in the Metropolitan Museum…
Tati-Isi (at right, wearing a perfume cone on her head and holding an heart-shaped amulet in her left) being led by Anubis (jackal-headed) into the presence of Ra-Harakhty enthroned (mummiform, falcon-headed, wearing the Solar disk with the Uraeus, holding the Flail and the ‘Heqa’-scepter). In the middle, the altar with the offerings (loaves of bread topped by lotus flowers).
On the top, the Two Eyes, and a sacred falcon holding two 'shen’-rings (symbol of eternal protection)

3

A games box found in the Tomb of Tutankhamun

This is the original description of the box:

DESCRIPTION:

A game-box with a drawer at each end for the playing-pieces. The top is laid-out for the 3 x 10 game = (30 squares) The base is laid-out for the 3 x 4 + 8 game = (20 squares)

Basic wood of poor quality; overlaid with slabs of ivory; the divisions of the top (3 x 10) and base (3 x 4 + 8) of gold upon stucco. The ivory slabs upon the sides are elaborately carved and stained thus: -

Both sides of same design, made up of one large slab & two small pieces at the ends, thus: <> on one side of the box under the ivory <> (a joiner’s mark)

Top of box divided as follows: -

The divisions of gold on stucco. 3 x 10 No special marks on squares.

Base of box divided as follows: the divisions of gold upon stucco. 3 x 4 +8 the symbols (in squares) faintly marked upon the ivory in white paint

The small wooden drawers (painted red) that fit into the ends of the gaming-box are faced with ivory and have the ’<>-bolt’ fastenings which are shot into gold staples.

See also No. 620-110 Two pairs of (Táb) playing sticks which probably belong to this game.

5. playing-pieces of ivory, thus: - <>black, red, red, red, black. Nat. Size.

5. playing-pieces of ivory, thus: - red, red, black, red, red, Nat. Size.

2 Knuckle-bones of ivory, thus: <>plain ivory Nat. Size

REMARKS:

Two of the side end pieces of ivory missing, The gold bolts wrenched off by tomb-thieves. Drawers will not fit in properly owing to warping. The playing pieces scattered in both Annexe and Antechamber. One of the drawers found a large distance from box. The box has suffered much from rough usage on the part of the thieves.

The first photograph was taken by Harry Burton, and shows the box in situ. It’s faintly visible in the bottom left corner, marked by a 593.

Photo two was also taken by Burton, and showing the box and its’ pieces after removal from the tomb.

Photo three is a modern one, showing the box in colour.

Source 1

Source 2

Guardian Deities (that are the Guardian Deities of the Gates of the House of Osiris in the Field of Rushes, see spells 144-147 and 145-146 of the “Book of Coming Forth by Day”) from the second funerary papyrus of the Chantress of the God Amon-Ra, NesyKhonsu; XXI Dynasty, now in the Cairo Museum…
To the right, the end of the third scene with four seated mummiform Gods:
in the upper register (from right to left), the first God is falcon-headed and wears the Solar disk, and the second is human-headed;
in the lower register (from right to left), the first God is jackal-headed, and the second is hare-headed.

In the middle, the fourth scene with seven standing mummiform Gods:
(from right to left) the first God is human-headed, the second is jackal-headed, the third is falcon-headed, the fourth is serpent-headed, the fifth has the head of a donkey facing front, the sixth is uraeus-headed, and the seventh has a Solar disk with two serpents as head.
To the left, a huge Uraeus

Ancient Egyptian Gods and Godesses

Aries: Seth - God of chaos

Taurus: Bastet - Goddess of pleasure

Gemini: Horus - God of the sky

Cancer: Anubis - God of the dead 

Leo: Amun - King of the Gods

Virgo: Khepri - God of creation 

Libra: Ma’at - Goddess of truth, justice and harmony

Scorpio: Osiris - God of the dead and ruler of the underworld

Sagittarius: Ra - The Sun God

Capricorn: Sekhmet - Goddess of war

Aquarius: Thoth - God of writing and knowledge

Pisces: Hathor - Goddess of love and joy

scenes from the second funerary papyrus of the Chantress of the God Amon-Ra, NesyKhonsu; XXI Dynasty, now in the Cairo Museum…
To the right, the end of the fourth scene with two of the “Guardian Deities of the House of Osiris in the Field of Rushes” (see spells 144-147 and 145-146 of the “Book of Coming Forth by Day”) and a huge Uraeus; the Guardian Deities are represented mummiform, the one at right is uraeus-headed and the other has a Solar disk with two serpents as head.
To the left, the fifth and last scene with three huge serpents (that are some of the sacred serpents of “the Mounds of the House of Osiris in the Field of Rushes”, see spells 149-150 of the “Book of Coming Forth by Day”) each emerging from a house