Qin Dynasty bronze weight, late 200s BCE. One of the ways in which the “first emperor,” Qin Shihuangdi, unified the warring states of China was through the standardization of weights and measures. Weights like this were distributed throughout China, often with edicts about the necessity of standardization written on them. 

Central Asian Bronze Sword, 1200-800 BC

From the Caspian Sea region. A unique bronze short sword with double terminals that look like budding long-petaled flowers, a very rare style. This weapon does not bear marks of having been repeatedly sharpened for use so it was probably made specifically to accompany a warrior in death as grave goods.

The area around the Caspian Sea, particularly on its southeast coast, and into modern day Iran, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, and Baluchistan (western Pakistan), was a cultural hotbed during this time period. The map of archaeological finds from there is studded with urban centers, large burial mounds, and technological and metallurgical innovation - especially in the production of amazing bronze artifacts, probably with influence from the innovative bronze (and later iron) artisans in Luristan (modern day northwestern Iran). People - both men and women - went to their graves with beautiful, well-made weapons like this one that were more than likely a sign of high status.

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Breath of the Wild Armour Sets [Part 1]

A few weeks ago, I announced that I was working on a Zelda project. Well, this is it! I challenged myself to draw every single armour set in Breath of the Wild. There are a total of 21 armour sets but I plan on drawing 4 additional items that are not part of sets (Eg, Champion’s Tunic) However, Tumblr only allows 10 pictures at once so here’s the first 10: 

  1. Gerudo
  2. Zora
  3. Desert Voe
  4. Ancient
  5. Hylian
  6. Snowquill
  7. Barbarian
  8. Stealth
  9. Climber
  10. Radiant

I have yet to draw the remaining 15 but I will upload everything in one shot when it’s done! 

Also, yes, I am going to draw the Amiibo exclusives too. Even sets that are unobtainable (Eg. Fierce Diety). Look out for it! :)

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Lindholm Høje, Denmark

Lindholm Høje (Lindholm Hills, from Old Norse haugr, hill or mound) is a major Viking burial site and former settlement situated to the north of and overlooking the city of Aalborg in Denmark.

The southern (lower) part of Lindholm Høje dates to 1000 – 1050 AD, the Viking Age, while the northern (higher) part is significantly earlier, dating back to the 5th century AD in the Nordic Iron Age. An unknown number of rocks have been removed from the site over the centuries, many, for example, being broken up in the 19th century for use in road construction.

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Rare Egyptian Bronze Cat Nursing Kittens, Late Dynastic, C. 712-343 BC

A cast bronze fragment of a piece that was perhaps a cuff or applique.

The ancient Egyptians, rather uniquely among the world’s civilizations, had an obsession with cats, both tame and fierce, large and small. Cats were domesticated to help protect crops from pests in Cyprus or possibly Mesopotamia (it is difficult to interpret the archaeological record on this matter for a variety of reasons), but the Egyptian’s love of cats seems to have gone above and beyond that of their contemporaries. The cemetery at Hierakonpolis includes a cat skeleton in a pre-Dynastic tomb (c. 3700 BC) that had a broken left humerus and right femur that seem to have been set by a human and allowed to heal before that cat’s ultimate death.

The first illustration of a cat with a collar comes from a 5th Dynasty (c. 2500 to 2350 BC) Egyptian tomb at Saqqara. Cats were the most frequently mummified animal in Egypt and there were multiple feline goddesses, including the domesticated cat-form Bastet. Bronze statues like this one may have been direct offerings or appeals to Bastet.