American-Tribes

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Police Killing of Unarmed Native American Continues To Receive Little Media Attention

The tragic case of Corey Kanosh, 35, has received very little media attention, in spite of the growing outrage over police shootings of unarmed, innocent citizens. In Corey’s case, we are not dealing with an African American man shot by white cops, but an unarmed Native American man who was suspected of crimes that he was later proven innocent of, who was given only seconds before police opened fire on him.

Corey was a member of the Paiute Tribe of Utah. In spite of the historical injustices committed by the State against Native Americans, his story has received virtually no national attention. Now, his friends and family have been pushing to move the legal process forward, but so far they have only raised a tiny amount of money.

“The hold up on progressing has been due to lack of money to fund the oh so dreaded legal process,” they explain. “We need your help. Please help us on our way to get this case back up and ready. It’s time to take on the unwilling non-cooperative Millard County Sheriffs Department.”

Corey was shot by a Millard County sheriff’s deputy after he was wrongly suspected of car theft.

Sheriff’s spokeswoman Lindsay Mitchell explained that a 911 call was made about the theft of a car from the Kanosh Paiute Indian Reservation. But Corey had nothing to do with that.

Unarmed Paiute indigenous man innocent of all crimes killed by white cop in 10 seconds

Justice For Corey Kanosh Fundraiser

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PLEASE WATCH THIS

Then read this and possibly sign this.

My tribe isn’t federally recognized, so we’re basically invisible to the government (you can read about that here). This dam raise is a super huge threat to our culture; stopping it from happening is really important.

IF YOU CAN’T SIGN THE PETITION, PLEASE AT LEAST REBLOG THIS POST. IT WOULD MEAN A LOT TO ME AND MY PEOPLE. LIKE, PLEASE.

UPDATE: PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION TOO

While fighting for the US during WWII, Joe Medicine Crow became the last war chief of the Crow tribe by completing the 4 required tasks: touch an enemy without killing him, take an enemy’s weapon, lead a successful war party, and steal an enemy’s horse. Whenever he went to battle, he wore his war paint under his Army uniform and a sacred eagle feather under his helmet. Source

Glass Gem is a unique strain of corn with kernels that look like pieces of rainbow-colored glass. Source

Carl Barnes, an Oklahoma farmer, started growing older corn varieties to connect with his Cherokee heritage. 

He isolated ancestral strains Native American tribes lost in the 1800s when they were relocated to Oklahoma.

Soon he began exchanging ancient corn seed with growers from all over the country, while simultaneously saving and replanting seeds from the most colorful cobs.

This eventually resulted in rainbow-colored corn.

When the rainbow corn mixed with the traditional varieties it created new strains, displaying more vibrant colors and patterns over time.

Glass Gem is a flint corn, so it isn’t really eaten off the cob. It’s usually ground into cornmeal and used in tortillas or grits, but it can also be used to make popcorn.

If you love corn and rainbows, seeds can be purchased online for about $7.95.

It’s Time to Speak Up for Salmon!

Kayla Brown, Hupa, stands with Chief Caleen Sisk, Winnemem Wintu, for Rivers and Water.

The Hupa People are in a crisis situation, with a potential repeat of the 2002 salmon kill on the Klamath and Trinity Rivers. Because the Bureau of Reclamation is refusing to let enough water out of the dams, the rivers are too low and too warm, and the salmon are beginning to show signs of disease.

Indigenous Names and Places on Map gives true perspective on North America

A new indigenous map has been introduced to the public domain which depicts the original territories and correct names of the the Indigenous people of North America. It is the work of Aaron Carapella, a Cherokee of Oklahoma who created the map from humble beginnings.

“I don’t have any formal training in cartography. I have a degree in marketing.” says Carapella. “I just plotted them on an actual cardboard; four posters together and put the names in over years.”

Carapella brought his research together with a graphic designer and together they came up with three maps; one showing mainland U.S.A., one showing only Canada, and the other the North American content in its entirety. “I was the nerdy kid who was into native history.” Carapella joked. “I would go to pow wows and I’d see these maps and they were kind of cheesy; there was only 50 tribes in all of North America.“

[read more]

Medicine Crow, by Charles Milton Bell c.1880  


“Medicine Crow was a warrior from the time he first went on the warpath at the age of fifteen until his last battle in 1877. He attained chieftaincy about 1870 at the age of twenty-two, and from then on he set the pace for aspiring young warriors of his people.

Until his death in 1920, at the age of seventy-two, he was a "reservation chief,” concerned with helping the Crow tribe “learn to live in the ways of the white man” as soon and as efficiently as possible. He went to see the Great Father in Washington many times on behalf of his people.”

text via http://lib.lbhc.cc.mt.us/about/history/jmc.php

photo via American-Tribes.com 

gofundme.com
Please help my tribe preserve our heritage

My nikpa (grandfather) started a gofundme for our tribe please boost this and donate if you can, my nikpa is doing so much work to try to preserve our culture and history.

“We, the Konkow Valley Band of Maidu Indians, were almost destroyed by the California Gold Rush Era of 1848.   Family members were killed while others were rounded up and taken to the Round Valley Reservation.  Our Band (Tribe) is unrecognized by the government but we are taking steps by petitioning for recognition.  Our Great-Grandmother (Yohema) escaped capture and was able to start a family in Yankee Hill, California.
We struggle as a Tribe with no landbase.  The money raised will be used to put a down on some property whereas we can develop a Community Center/Museum for our Tribes future education program.   For those that donate funds a plaque will honor those for helping with our heartfelt thanks.”

Minnie Spotted Wolf (1923–1988) was the first Native American woman to serve in the United States Marine Corps.

A member of the Blackfoot tribe, Spotted Wolf spent her childhood working on her father’s ranch in Heart Butte, Montana, where she cut fence posts, drove trucks and broke horses. She first expressed an interest in joining the army when she was aged 18, shortly after the US entered into World War 2 at the end of 1941. However she was initially discouraged by a recruitment officer who told her that the war was ‘not for women’.

Spotted Wolf was eventually accepted into the Marine Corps Women’s Reserve in July 1943, making her the first Native American female Marine. She almost did not accept the post as her father was dying from a horse riding accident, however her mother and sister strongly encouraged her to pursue her ambitions. She underwent rigorous boot camp training at Camp Lejeune, during which she gained 15 pounds of weight from the diet and rigorous exercise. She later described the training as “hard, but not too hard” given her background on the ranch.

On completion of her training Spotted Wolf went on to serve 4 years in the Marines in California and Hawaii. She drove trucks loaded with heavy equipment, a job normally reserved for men, and also sometimes worked as a jeep driver for visiting generals. Spotted Wolf’s career quickly gathered media attention and she was featured in numerous news stories, and even her own comic book, to promote the war effort.

Following her discharge in 1947, Spotted Wolf returned to Montana where she married a farmer named Robert England with whom she had four children. She attended college to qualify as a teacher and spent the next 29 years teaching in reservation schools. She died in 1988 aged 65 and was buried in her military uniform.

countercurrentnews.com
U.S. Government Bans Native American Tribe From Protesting On Their Own Land – Send In Police To Remove Protesters
A North Dakota federal court has prohibited indigenous tribes from protesting the Bakken pipeline on their own reservations. Dakota Access, a developer of the pipeline, filed the report citing "Worker and law enforcement safety was at risk". This reaction originates from the non-violent protest by the Sanding Rock, Rose Bud and lower Brule Sioux.Dave Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock ...