American healthcare

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If you are like me and don’t like talking on the phone, here’s a really easy way to get a message to your members of Congress! It’s called ResistBot. Text ‘Resist’ to 50409 and follow the instructions. It’s really simple, and quick! I did it in about 10 minutes, but it could take 5 for some people. I sent a fax to each of my Senators, and tomorrow ResistBot is going to text me a reminder to send a fax to my Representatives!

7

In news coverage of the GOP health care bill, outlets should be asking how in the hell they justify premium hikes for survivors of rape, sexual assault, and domestic violence – all considered pre-existing conditions under the AHCA.

i’m always so amazed when i hear americans say shit like “healthcare is a privilege, not a right”. like how do you reach a point in your life where you think people deserve to die because they can’t afford healthcare. what in the actual fuck is wrong with you.

Turns out I can’t get the new medication my doctor prescribed to help with bladder spasms. It’s over one hundred dollars a month.

This is the third medication in four months that I’ve been prescribed that cost over one hundred dollars a month. The third medication I’ve been excited to try to improve my quality of life and had to walk away empty handed.

These medications are to help improve my organs that are no longer working. I need these medicines to function and I can’t get them. I have looked into every coupon and sponser programs and still can’t afford them. All of the meds were still well over fifty dollars.

I partially blame my doctors for prescribing these new medications way out of my price range. They can see I’m on twelve different monthly scripts. That’s a high cost even if they are affordable. But America’s healthcareand pharmaceutical systems are the real culprits.

They’re robbing sick patients of important medications to help them live to fill their own pockets and it’s beyond frustrating. I have to pick and choose what crucial medications I can actually get because I can’t afford them. It’s not fair to patients to extort us for so much money over necessary medications. It’s not fair.

Anyone else panicking about the executive order POTUS is set to sign soon that’s going to undermine the ACA? Because I sure as hell am. The ACA isn’t perfect, but it is better than what we had before; I’m afraid of what will happen when this order is signed. As far as I know, insurance companies could deny people with pre-existing conditions, things like mental health care, pregnancy, rehab services, etc., may not be covered, and I definitively can tell you people will die.

This isn’t what executive orders ought to be used for. Congress has repeatedly struck down the suggestion of repealing the ACA. I feel like the dystopian future we like to read about I already here.

@able bodied people, yes it’s nauseating to call sexual assault or childbirth a preexisting condition. I’m saying this as an assault survivor. But please don’t take away from the danger of people with medical conditions and disabilities that are actually preexisting conditions. We are in serious danger. So are sexual assault survivors and moms. So please don’t forget us disabled and ill Americans, include everyone in your activism.

Message: THE HOUSE HAS ACTUALLY VOTED TO REPEAL OBAMACARE MORE THAN ONCE UNDER OBAMA.

Breathe.  And then get on the phone with your Senator.

Y'all, this is not the first time that the House has passed a measure to repeal Obamacare. They did it more than once under Obama because there were enough Republicans in the House to do so. If you really want to stop this repeal, call those Moderate Republicans ***IN THE SENATE*** who said during the last effort to repeal Obamacare that they would vote “no” if it got out of the House and into the Senate. Make sure they’re still going to vote “no.” There are quite a few measures that make it out of the House and fail in the Senate because the House is made up of more reactionary, less pragmatic politicians than the Senate, who are career folks always thinking about the next reelection.

The only difference between now and the other times this repeal has passed the House vote is the fact that the repeal only needs a simple majority in the Senate (51 votes) instead of the 2/3rds majority (60 votes) previously required because the repeal has been attached to a budget reconciliation measure that can’t be filibustered (thanks to a shady piece of legislation passed in January).

Point is, don’t throw your hands up, and if you’re really upset, go get on the phone. There is still a better than fair chance that the Senate will toss this repeal, but they need to be reminded of what’s at stake for the country and (more important to them) their political careers.

‘Die-in’ protesters dragged away from McConnell’s office

Dramatizing fears that Senate Republican’s Better Care Reconciliation Act’s cuts to Medicaid would prevent millions of low income Americans from accessing life-saving care, activism group ADAPT dramatized what those deaths could look like — in front of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office doors.

Capitol police were then forced to drag away dozens of protestors who were lying on the floor feigning death.

See FULL STORY by Taylor Rogers/Yahoo News

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A protester is removed by police

Stephanie Woodward, of Rochester, NY, who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair, is removed from a sit-in at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as she and other disability rights advocates protest proposed funding caps to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A man is removed from a sit-in

A man is removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as they protest proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Police lead away a protester

A protester is escorted by police after being arrested during a demonstration outside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s constituent office after Senate Republicans unveiled their healthcare bill on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Police remove a protester

People are removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as they protest proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protestor is removed from a sit-in

A protestor is removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office where they protested proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Police prepare to remove a protester

Capitol Police prepare to remove a man from a sit-in of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office, as he and others protest proposed caps to Medicaid Thursday, June 22, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Police escort a protester away

A protester is escorted by police away from a demonstration outside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s constituent office after Senate Republicans unveiled their healthcare bill in Washington, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

The soles of a man’s sneakered feet are seen as he is removed by Capitol Police from a sit-in of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office, as he and others protest proposed caps to Medicaid Thursday, June 22, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protester is led away

A demonstrator in a wheelchair protesting cuts to Medicaid is led from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell by a U.S. Capitol police officer at the Russell Senate Office building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protestor shouts

A protestor against the Senate Republican’s draft healthcare bill shouts outside the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky, on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protester is escorted away

U.S. Capitol Police remove a protester from in front of the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) inside the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, on June 22, 2017 in Washington. (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protester is wheeled away

A demonstrator in a wheelchair protesting cuts to Medicaid is led from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell by a U.S. Capitol police officer at the Russell Senate Office building in Washington on Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

f-van-lieshout  asked:

Hey Wayfaring! I wanted to ask, how come doctors earn so much money if healthcare is so cheap? It is like this where I live, not sure about the US but it mustn't be that different right? I'm just curious. Greetings from the Netherlands

I don’t know how the healthcare system in the Netherlands works AT ALL, but let’s get one thing straight about the US: healthcare is NOT cheap here. 

AMERICAN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM 101:

  • Healthcare in the US is more expensive than anywhere else in the world
  • We believe the lie that we have the best healthcare in the world. Our rates of obesity, premature birth, maternal/fetal mortality, and life expectancy all point to the fact that we are way behind other developed nations. 
  • College and graduate medical education in the US is more expensive than anywhere else in the world.
  • Salaries are high because costs are high, but cost of education is rapidly rising and wages are not keeping up.
  • Physicians in the US have one of the best paying jobs in the country.
  • Only about 20% of the money spent on healthcare in the US goes toward physician salaries
  • We have way more specialists than we need and we have way less primary care doctors than we need.
  • We have approximately 2.5 doctors per 1000 people in this country, which is way under what we need. Numbers for nurses are similarly low.
  • Healthcare in the US is treated as a business rather than a service. Thus patients are seen as customers and healthcare is becoming more about patient satisfaction rather than delivering quality care. 
  • Doctors’ salaries are often based on how many patients they see or how many procedures they do. 
  • Though doctors do make a lot of money, remember that they also pay a ton out of that salary in taxes, student loan payments, professional fees, and licensing requirements. 
  • Doctors work hours unlike most other careers and are not paid on the basis of their time. Most other jobs have limited hours and lengths of shifts, whereas doctors routinely work 60-80+ hours a week (yes, even past residency).
  • Reimbursement for services is a very complicated system in the US. It’s based on how complex the care is that’s being given, and procedures are valued higher than chronic illness management. Doctors/hospitals can theoretically charge whatever they want for their services, but how much money they actually get is based on what the insurance companies and Medicaid and Medicare are willing to pay.