American artists

I WOULD LIKE A MAJOR SECTION OF THE NOVEMBER ZINE TO FEATURE NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE BY NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISTS SINCE IN NOVEMBER THE UNITED STATES CELEBRATES THANKSGIVING.

WHETHER THIS BE YOUR NATIVE AMERICAN ART, POETRY, STORIES, OR PHOTOGRAPHS OF YOUR NATIVE CULTURE BEING PRACTICED/THE PIPELINE ISSUE I WOULD LOVE TO FEATURE IT!!

IT’S YOUR VOICE AND YOUR TIME TO SHINE!!

SUBMIT TO: thepeachzine@gmail.com (include name & age)

P.S. If you know anyone who has Native blood and has some pretty amazing stuff please let them know about this opportunity!!!!!

Garden in May
Maria Oakey Dewing (American; 1845–1927)
1895
Oil on canvas
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

It’s very difficult for female artists historically to garner a lot of attention, and then you add the sexual identity issues—I think all of those things kept her out of the mainstream.
— 

Joe Lucchesi, consulting curator for the Smithsonian American Art Museum

For years, artist Romaine Brooks was marginalized and nearly forgotten. 

Her androgynous appearance and choice to portray predominantly female subjects bucked convention in the early 20th century, and her work has been misinterpreted or overlooked in the mainstream since. 

A new exhibition at our @americanartmuseum brings together Brooks’ paintings and drawings with insight into her identity. Breaking from previous shows that largely ignored the artist behind the art, it reflects the recent cultural shift in how museums and society discuss issues of gender and sexuality.

The World Is Finally Ready to Understand Romaine Brooks, from @smithsonianmag

(Romaine Brooks, “Self-Portrait,” 1923, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the artist.)

Study of a Seated Man
John Singer Sargent (American; 1856–1925)
1895
Transfer lithograph on laid paper
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Printed by Frederick Goulding (British; 1842–1909).

Before pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted “I Know How You Must Feel, Brad…” he saw this frame in a newspaper comic by Ted Galindo. 

Lichtenstein clipped it out and included it in a 1963 letter to a curator. Now his inspiration is in the collection of our @archivesofamericanart.

Their exhibition, “Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art,” peeks into artists’ creative processes.

Jackson Pollock, Untitled, Ink on paper, c. 1950

Lady Helen Vincent, Viscountess d’Abernon
John Singer Sargent (American; 1856–1925)
1904
Oil on canvas
Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama

Andrew Wyeth, Christina’s World, Tempera on panel, 1948

…He recorded the arid landscape, rural house, and shacks with great detail, painting minute blades of grass, individual strands of hair, and nuances of light and shadow. In this style of painting, known as magic realism, everyday scenes are imbued with poetic mystery. (x)