Alumnus

Don’t ever tell me that marching band isn’t important.

I have had so many problems with public schools putting all the emphasis on athletics. When a school’s budget is cut, they don’t choose to take a little from each program. No. They choose to completely eradicate the arts programs, usually starting with the marching band. If you don’t play sports, you’re not a valuable asset, you’re not qualified for scholarships, and you mean nothing. Marching band? Why would we be impressed that you’re in marching band?

Anyone can do that.

Okay, fine. Anyone can do marching band. Anyone can spend hours on the field doing the same forty-second section over and over and over and over. Anyone can hit over 75 precise dots on the field with the correct step sizes, the correct amount of steps, the correct timing, without being so much as an inch to either side, in order and without looking at the yard line markers or the field. Anyone can memorize all of those extremely specific points on the grass and varying counts for steps and then execute them with a shako visor pulled down over your eyes and looking up at the press box the whole time. If you look down at the yard line markers to see where you are, congratulations, you just lost points for the group.

Anyone can memorize eight pages of notes, rhythms, dynamics, phrasing, and tempos. (But of course, before you do that you have to learn an instrument with hundreds of different fingerings and learn how to make slight changes in your lips to change notes and stay in tune.) Memorize all seven and a half minutes of music and then marry it to the seventy-five pages of drill you memorized. Do them both perfectly and at the same time. But you can’t just do what you memorized. You have to do it in perfect sync with everyone around you and know how to make the slightest adjustments to fit perfectly within the group. If you’re an inch to the right or barely a thousandth of a step sharp, it’ll throw everything off.

But anyone can do that.

Then add in the fact that you don’t get any individual credit for doing this. The closest you’ll come to recognition is your identity lumped into “The Such-and-Such Marching Band” as you all march onto the field looking exactly the same. You don’t have a number on your back. You have a uniform intended to erase you and turn you into dot T14 and nothing more.

But, for some reason you can’t explain, you love it. You love throwing everything you have into this ridiculously precise pursuit and then not getting any credit for it. You start thanking people when they call you a band geek. You start taping pictures of marching bands into your locker. You start wearing your band shirt everywhere you go. Because you look at the person in an identical uniform next to you and you know that you’ve done this for them and they’ve done this for you. This is more than just a team, this is a family; and if one person is missing from the form, the show can’t ever be the same. 

It costs so much money, so much time. You’re out there on the field in the blazing sun for fourteen hours a day during summer band camp, out in the street getting frostbite on your fingertips during the holiday parade. If anyone knew what you went through for this, they would wonder what made it all worth it.

And the truth is, what makes it all worth it cannot be described. It’s the camaraderie between you and the center snare, the colorguard newbie, the tenor sax player in the set in front of you. It’s the sunset behind you lighting up the back of your plume. It’s the hazy nostalgia that racks your chest with emotion. There’s something about the family you’ve chosen and the experience you’ve internalized that gives you the passion to throw everything down onto that field like nothing else matters in the world… because in that moment, it’s true. 

Your nerves are damaged from the cold. Your skin is damaged from the sun. Your joints are damaged from marching and marching and marching. You’re physically and mentally drained, your body is irreversibly compromised, you’re broke as hell, and all you have to show for it is a polyester jacket and a couple of blurry photographs.

But sports are what require hard work and dedication, not marching band.

Even though you complained basically the entire time you marched and even though you’re done with it, you pull out those photographs and you remember. You remember your first day of high school band camp when you had absolutely no idea what you were getting yourself into. You remember your first final retreat when they announced your band’s name as state champions, and you wanted to cry with happiness but you weren’t allowed to move, so you just clenched your fists so tight that your fingernails dug white crescents into your palms. You remember coming back the next year and thinking you knew everything as a sophomore, only to realize there was still so much to learn. You remember the band trips you spent months fundraising for, all the lame tourist attractions you visited between performances, and how you wouldn’t trade those memories for all the money in the world. You remember being a junior and getting nervous because people looked up to you now: as an upperclassman, as a section leader, as a friend. And then you were a senior and you cried on the final day of band camp. You remember how your life became a series of lasts. You had to decide which of the freshmen would inherit your band cubby, your lucky bottle of valve oil, your bus seat. You went to graduation but it didn’t mean anything because you still had one last band trip coming up. You didn’t shed a tear when you tossed your cap but you cried like a child after your last parade. You remember on the plane ride home, you expected to feel devastated and heartbroken, but you just felt… empty.

You remember printing out what seemed like the most difficult solo in the world. You remember driving up to your college and entering a room with a chair and a stand and a couple of people giving you skeptical looks. You remember getting an email from the college marching band with your audition results and reading it with tears of joy in your eyes because you realized it was starting all over again.

But marching band doesn’t mean anything. It doesn’t matter.

Tell me that it doesn’t matter. Tell me as many times as you want. You could scream it in my face and I still wouldn’t hear because the music we’re making is too damn loud to let anything else in. 

Tell me that it doesn’t matter when I’m standing on the field for the last time, knowing that everything behind me will last forever and that nothing will ever mean more to me than this… and all you’ve got is some money and a jersey with a number on the back.

Do not ever tell me that marching band isn’t important. It is everything to me, and it is everything to millions of other band geeks across the world.

When you refuse to support kids because they participate in the arts rather than athletics, you’re no better than the football player who takes lunch money from nerds.

To all of my fellow band geeks… keep marching, even if the world tells you it’s not worth it. It is. God, it is worth it, in ways no one else but you will ever understand. Continue your band career in college. Audition for a drum corps. Stay active in your high school band as an alumnus supporter. You are all my family. 

Safety tips for strippers

Preface: y'all need to understand that 99% of the men you encounter at work are a) lying about themselves in one way or another b) feel as though the circumstances for your employment somehow okays them to basically disrespect you or c) don’t understand that the services you provide are just active aspects of a fantasy. Recognize this so you can be in a better position to stand your ground and ensure your wellbeing


Tips:
1)NEVER give a customer your real name,location, the name of your university (regardless of how prestigious it is, if the customer is an alumnus, or if they attend the school. I don’t care. Don’t do it)

2) Don’t give customers your actual number. It’s far too easy to reverse search people via numbers. Get a trap phone or a google voice number

3) Always have your phone on. Better yet, download the Life360 app so your loved ones can keep track of your location

4)Diversify your routes back home and monitors the car behind you

5) Have a male employee escort you to your car and park your car at a well lit parking space

6) Keep an eye on your drinks. I always bring my drinks with me to my stage sets. If you have to go up to leave momentarily, bring your drink along with you.

7) get a can of pepper spray.

8)never stop at any restaurants or business within a mile radius of work coming to or leaving your shift

9)If you’re in an uncomfortable situation with a customer at VIP, feel free to leave even before the times up and tell management about the customer

10)don’t let anyone treat you badly or violate your comfort zone, regardless of whether or not you’re being paid to spend time with them. You’re not working a regular 9-5 so you’re not obligated to follow the “customer is always right” line of reasoning. When it comes to your comfort, never give a customer an inch; he’ll always take a mile

11) if you’re faced with a circumstance in which you have even the smallest bit of apprehension, don’t follow through with it. You’re never going to be at loss doing business as usual or turning someone down
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Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer condemned the protest in a statement, calling the gathering “a cowardly parade of hatred, bigotry, racism, and intolerance.”

“Everyone has a right under the First Amendment to express their opinion peaceably, so here’s mine: not only as the Mayor of Charlottesville, but as a UVA faculty member and alumnus, I am beyond disgusted by this unsanctioned and despicable display of visual intimidation on a college campus.”

Chem Miss

Author: @kpopfanfictrash as part of Bangtan University - a series of ongoing one shots with @eradikeats-writes

Creative Content Contributors: @daegusoftboys (her moodboards for the series are perfection)

Pairing: Reader / Jimin

Rating: 18+ (explicit sex, dirty talk)

Word Count: 12,807

Summary: “You’re my TA. I’m in your class. I’m sure you don’t want to spend your Saturday night talking to me about biochem.”

Jimin appears amused by this. “Who’s to say that I don’t? Also,” he leans in, a slight smile on his lips. “Who says we have to talk about Chemistry?”

Keep reading

Harry Styles Reflects on Life After One Direction & More at Grammy Museum in L.A.

Four months after releasing his eponymous debut and hitting No. 1 on the Billboard 200, One Direction alumnus Harry Styles revisited the album with executive producer Jeff Bhasker during an hour-long chat moderated by famed journalist and film director Cameron Crowe at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles on Friday night (Sept. 15).

During the conversation, the 23-year-old, who kicks off his world tour in San Francisco on Sept. 19, shared sharp and astute reflections on his artistic process, spanning everything from isolating himself in a studio in Jamaica to developing ideas to moving on from being in a band and how entering this chapter of his career allowed for new beginnings.

The chat began with Styles recalling how the record began: without any outside influence, and with nothing but fond memories of his time with 1D.

“We started the record without a label, so the start of the process didn’t feel like I was making any sort of commitment and I didn’t feel any pressure, [like] ‘You have to make this,’ or anyone have an influence on what they thought I should be making,” said Styles, clad in a black tee, black skinny jeans and a golf cap. “It was just a group of us writing stuff to have fun and writing some songs and seeing what came out with the thought that I would actually play them myself. I think that’s a large part of the record is that it started that way. It didn’t start from, what do they want? I think if you’re lucky, I didn’t go into making the album or leave the band coming out of it feeling suppressed or feeling like I never got to write what I wanted to write. I loved being in the band so much and got to learn so much, and with this, I felt like I could just have a good time working out what it would sound like if I made an album.”

When Bhasker, who has credits on projects from Beyonce and Rihanna to fun. and Mark Ronson, was first approached to work with Styles, he cancelled not one but two meetings with the pop star – something Styles was quick to remind him – but inevitably came around.

“I was in a place where I knew he was a very high profile person and artist and I was kind of searching for something else than doing that,” Bhasker explained. “When you come full circle, and I think the kind of music that we made, it’s so ironic that that first impulse I thought it would be, I think the album reflects it.” “To be honest, I didn’t know any of that,” quipped Styles to laughter. “I’m sort of sad! I mean it’s Hollywood, everyone cancels.”

Crowe served as a pensive moderator, drawing from anecdotes he learned from writing the Rolling Stone cover story on Styles in April 2017. “Are the best songs the most personal songs in general?” he asked. “I think my favorite songs,” responded Styles, “but my favorite way to listen to music is on my own, with my eyes closed for example, or not. If I’m driving, or operating machinery, I usually keep them open. But my favorite song on the album, the last song, ‘From the Dining Room,’ is the most personal to me and I think my favorite one. But I don’t think they have to be. I think it’s just as important to have songs that are fun and make you feel great, and I think that’s just as important as everything being moody and deep and meaningful.”

Bhasker recounted how he initially sat with Styles on his balcony, listening to reference tracks thinking they were Styles demos but were actually White Stripes songs. Bhasker initially had mentee producers hit the studio with Styles, but got more involved when the singer, wanting to unplug from distractions (including Instagram and Twitter, which Styles now rarely uses), took a recommendation from a friend to go to Jamaica to work in a singular recording space.

“I felt I was going into the studio to make an album I wanted to make,” said Styles. “I didn’t feel like, what do I need to make as Harry from that band for it to be good? I missed music. I just wanted to go on and write with my friends and have a good time and hopefully like what came out at the end.”

In the end, Harry Styles became a renowned success, spawning the single “Sign of the Times” that peaked at No. 4 on the Hot 100, amid a year where his theatrical debut in Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk also marked his first time at the top of the box office. The chat concluded with Styles taking a few questions from the fans, explaining that his signature rings that he wears are from various people including grandparents and for his goddaughter and even taking a kazoo from one fan who suggested he play any song of his choosing (he picked one from Shania Twain).

It wouldn’t be a night without some music, and Styles strapped on a six-string to play a stripped-down version of “Two Ghosts” alongside Bhasker on keys and guitarist Mitch Rowland. Some words from earlier rang true as he thanked the audience: “It made it so we were in Jamaica, we’re in the studio every day, we just didn’t think about anything else. It was about these five guys in a room, we’re in Jamaica, let’s make some music that we want to sit in Jamaica and listen to, and that was it. I found it so difficult to explain music and making it and so much of the details, and we just wanted to write what we wanted to listen to and what we loved. And we finished with an album that we’re so happy with.”

this is Le Mont Saint Michel, in Normandie, France. it’s also where Beauxbatons Academy of Magic is located. and listen i KNOW Beauxbatons is supposed to be in the Pyrenees but it’s only rumored to be so i will take this hc to the grave

ok now that this is out of the way hear me out 

this is le mont saint michel, and depending on the tide it’s either an island or accessible by foot

the witches arrived in 1265 and never left because come on, even the location screams magic it would be a shame not to take advantage of it. even the wizarding world has aesthetic needs to fulfill.

there are some muggles on the island, but most of them have been there forever and their parents before them, and having lived through WW2 and the invention of television,  they can think of weirder things than magic. Also they have other shit to do than go and tell everyone about beauxbatons and plus they quite like those wizards, they’re polite and make delicious drinks so everyone is happy to mind their own business. 

and this pals, is Beauxbatons Academy of Magic : 

the architecture is famous all over the world and has therefore attracted many tourists over the years so the academy has decided to open some parts of the castle to the public. 

but do not worry they’ve thought this through! a powerful glamour has been cast over the whole place for it to look to the muggles like they’re visiting an abbey. 

for example, this is a muggle photo of a statue of Nicolas Flamel, famous alumnus of Beauxbatons Academy. 

and if you’re still not convinced here are a couple of photos proving that this place is definitely magical

Bonus : this is La Mère Poulard, the best restaurant on the island. Anne Boutiaut, who owns the place, is a 166 yo witch and to this day, she still hasn’t disclosed to recipe to her famous omelet. the muggles think she’s just in very good shape for her age. 

you can also see witches and wizards of all ages, unwinding with a butterbear after a long day, looking fondly at the oblivious muggles 

it’s a happy place 

Work Your Body, Let’s Dance

Wanna One’s Kang Daniel X Reader [ fem ver ]

TW: mentions of alcohol, has some sexual references, all in all pretty mature content but not really since I’m small


it’s in between fluff and angst idk :(

Word count: 3747

• frat boy, college! au Daniel
• the most elite fraternity on campus, the 101 is hosting a huge party in celebration of summer
• it’s a long night, this part is exclusive, invite-only

hey, anon, hope you don’t mind I added frat boy au bc that was the first thing that popped into my head when I read your request. 😬 i’m not the best at this kind of scenarios ( apparently i’m known as the fluff, innocence, and young love writer ) but i will try, thank you, anon. S/O to my gem @woojiniee for the help 💝

- admin L
PS: very unrealistic considering the fact i have never partied and contains no dancing contrary to the title…..

__________

Your own apartment complex was dull and quiet, many students had already packed up and left to go home for Summer break but just a few blocks down, the 101 fraternity house was teeming with life. And that was where you and your friends were heading next. It was going to be THE party of the Summer before the holidays had even begun. You knew it. The 101 never held back on parties. So, even though parties were not your preferred scene, you rarely missed out on a 101 party.

Being invited to a 101 party was almost like being invited to a state dinner. They were just that recognised and distinct. Despite their popularity, not much was known about them. They were lowkey yet highkey. Some basic information was that there were eleven main members who lived in the house but they had almost a hundred seniors who graduated before them or juniors they were ‘training’ to maintain the prestige of the 101. It was definitely intriguing. 

Keep reading

The Only Real “Centrist” Agenda

With Steve Bannon on way out, official Washington is jumping for joy that Gary Cohn – the former president of Goldman Sachs who’s now running Trump’s National Economic Council, along with Dina Powell, another influential Goldman Sachs alumnus,  – seems to be taking over Trump’s brain.

As CNBC puts it, Cohn will push “more moderate, business-friendly economic policies.” The Washington Post says Cohn is advocating “a centrist vision.” The Post goes on to describe “The growing strength of Cohn and like-minded moderates" as revealed in Trump’s endorsement of government subsidies for exports, and of corporate tax cuts. Says the Post: “The president’s new positions move him much closer to the views of … mainstream Republicans and Democrats.”

In reality, Cohn, Powell, and other Wall Streeters in the Trump White House are pushing Trump closer to the views of Wall Street and big business – views that are reflected in the views of “mainstream” Republicans and Democrats only to the extent the “mainstream” is dependent on the Street and big corporations for campaign money.

These views aren’t “centrist,” and they’re not sustainable. More tax breaks for the rich and more subsidies for big corporations aren’t much better for America than xenophobia.

Wall Street and corporate America seem not to have learned a thing from what’s happened over the past year. Do they really believe the anger, rage, hate, racism, and nationalism that welled up during the 2016 election was a random, passing phenomenon, like a particularly bad hurricane?

If so, they’re wrong. These sentiments came from a shrinking and ever more anxious working class. From millions of people so convinced the game is rigged against them they were prepared to overthrow the established order in order to get fundamental change. From voters whipped up into a fury over tax breaks and subsidies and bailouts for those at the top – socialism for the rich – but who for years have been getting the harsh losing end of the capitalist stick: declining wages, mass firings, less job security, emptying towns and cities, and their children with even lower and fewer prospects.  

They came from people who during the Great Recession lost their jobs, homes, and savings, as Wall Street got bailed out for its wanton greed, and not a single top Wall Street executive went to jail.

The so-called “centrist” policies that Wall Street and big corporations are now happily promoting via Gary Cohn and Dina Powell won’t reverse these sentiments. They’ll add to them, because these were same sort of the policies that got us to this point.  

There’s a better alternative. It’s to make it easy for people who lose their jobs to get new ones that pay at least as well, through wage insurance;  expand the Earned Income Tax Credit and raise the minimum wage so every job pays a living wage; invest in great teachers and great schools, along with a system of lifelong learning, and high-quality early childhood education; and provide Medicare for all.

And pay for all of this with a 2 percent tax on wealth over $1 million and a carbon tax. While we’re at it, get big money out of politics.

Here’s a  “centrist” agenda that big business, Wall Street, and the rest of America should agree on because it (or something very much like it) is the only way to move forward without inviting even more inequalities of income, wealth, and political power – and ever more vicious backlashes against such inequities.

If Wall Street and big business used the 2016 election as a teachable moment, they would realize this.

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@UEAlumni  Congrats @ItsRamiMalek on being named the 2017 Young Alumnus. Unfortunately he couldn’t make it but shared a message

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“You know that feeling when you see someone getting off a bus and their body language as they disembark… you can feel everything about that experience. I think we carry so much and communicate so much through our bodies. And there’s a really kind of guttural connection to that, as simple as seeing someone smile and wanting to smile. We share so much through small gestures that we make everyday and, for me, cinema is a language to express that because it can put you in the point of view of another body like no other medium. There’s traditional dance on film but I’m also interested in this other space, which is focused on just how we communicate, and how to express that through such a vibrant and living art form.”

Read: Tribeca alumnus Anna Rose Holmer talks to Matthew Eng about her gorgeous and psychologically-astute feature directorial debut, The Fits, now back at Metrograph for a limited time only!

anonymous asked:

What's haileys favorite game?

An erotic dating sim about High school alumnus who visits his old school to catch up with one (or more) of his favorite teachers. The plot is pretty cookie cutter, but the gameplay? very much worth 20 bucks…