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The Equal Justice Initiative is building a memorial for lynching victims — and it’s about time.

The Equal Justice Initiative announced on Tuesday that it will build the first-ever national memorial to lynching victims in Montgomery, Alabama. Titled “Memorial to Peace and Justice,” the EJI project will sit on six acres of land that used to be a public housing project in Montgomery. 

The structure will include the thousands of lynching victims’ names on concrete columns, which will represent hundreds of U.S. counties where the acts took place. The memorial will also coincide with the opening of a museum.

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President Obama designates 3 new national monuments — all civil rights sites

  • Closing in on his final week in office, President Obama on Thursday designated three spots as national monuments — all of them related to U.S. civil rights. 
  • The sites include a church in Alabama where four young black girls were killed by a bomb, a Freedom Riders monument in Alabama and a former school for freed slaves in South Carolina.
  • “Today, I am designating new national monuments that preserve critical chapters of our country’s history, from the Civil War to the civil rights movement,” Obama said in a White House statement. 
  • “These monuments preserve the vibrant history of the Reconstruction Era and its role in redefining freedom.” Read more

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Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge encompasses some of Alabama’s last remaining undisturbed coastal barrier habitat. The name Bon Secour is French for “safe harbor,” very appropriate considering the sanctuary it provides for native flora and fauna. This refuge is a natural oasis of wildlands, where wildlife can exist without harm. It may be too cold to go in the water, but even in winter, a walk on the beach can be a beautiful experience. Photo by Stephanie Pluscht, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Hey guys, I honestly can’t believe I’m in a position to make this kind of post but this is where we are.

This is an old friend of mine I knew growing up. That black and white photo is a picture of the two of us all the way back in kindergarten, happy as clams on our way to a girl scout meeting. When I knew her she was always very sweet and quiet, but also had the best sense of humor and was incredibly talented. We were good friends in grade school, and played basketball together later on in middle school. Later on, I was best friends with her neighbor as well. I haven’t seen her in years, despite attending the same college, but she is a huge part of who I was growing up.

Her name is Mary Carmen Nichols. She’s 19 years old and lives in Vestavia Hills, Alabama. She currently attends school in downtown Birmingham. Earlier this morning, her parents found her missing from her home. Both her cell phone and her car were still there. I’ve known her and her family for a very long time and they are all incredibly wonderful people. She would never just run away, not like this. If you have any information to offer, please please please call the number from the article.

Even if you don’t know her or you don’t live in the area, I’m begging you to please signal boost this. Please.

‘The Black Panther Party - Speech by John Hulett / Interview with Stokely Carmichael / Report from Lowndes County’, Socialist Workers Party, United States, 1966.
This pamphlet is about the first Black Panther Party in Lowndes County, Alabama that inspired the more well known BPP to form in Oakland, California.