Against-the-Tide

the signs as suburban haunts

ARIES: flattened paper boats scattered like the remains of a murdered animal along a dried up river, rundown motels with their blasted neon signs and smashed-in windows, pink streamers from some neighborhood child’s birthday party shuffling across the street like bright tumbleweed, a train rattling off into the breathless night & the trace remnants of a week old bonfire found in the middle of nowhere. 

TAURUS: chipped paint, shattered shot glasses lying across an abandoned pool table missing a few billiard balls, flyers rustling like autumn leaves against the tempestuous tides of the wind, advertising concerts & magic shows that took place in 2005, the sillage of old perfume clogging up the air, still thick as the scent of blood or wildflowers.

GEMINI: the corpse of a cigarette that hasn’t touched a mouth in months, a dilapidated playground where lost souls come out to play, threadbare curtains ripped like the wings of a dissected bird, strange red-brown stains across the hotel bedsheets, a gate grown weary with new-forming foliage & age, whining erroneously whenever maneuvered. 

CANCER: an empty casket, coffee rim imprints across hardwood tables, an old, tattered shoe lying haphazardly on the side of the road, a junkyard littered with ancient cars still soggy with stories, a pick-up with a broken windshield, a cadillac with a massacred paint job, someone’s motorcycle with blood staining the front tire, an askew portrait with eyes that follow you around the room.

LEO: a carnival horse with one eye scratched out, a daycare centre that shut down years ago, plagued with the colorful ghosts of children’s drawings still tacked to the crumbling walls, a spiral staircase that seems to shift direction when nobody’s paying attention, crunched up beer cans rolling across an empty rooftop & lichen kissing the concrete. 

VIRGO: the supermarket, flickering & eerie at night like the shadows unearthed beneath troubled eyes, owls stirring in between the murmuring trees, a single upturned grave in a cemetery that isn’t supposed to be notorious for hauntings, an old fountain still glistening with pennies that are no longer considered currency, a collapsed bottle of wine running the tiles red.

LIBRA: handprints imprinted onto fogged-up windows, red rooms crowded with developing photographs of people whose faces you recognize but cannot quite place, broken doll heads, a necklace that erupted into a sea of pearls, a deflated blow up kiddie pool collecting parched grass and critters, a busted arcade game & the laughter of people long gone still trapped inside the walls.

SCORPIO: books with grimacing yellow pages, someone attempting to sell you a cursed object on etsy, a leaky shower-head, a clock that’s stuck in time, a torn, unravelled couch sitting deserted in someone’s front lawn, candy stores that proclaim sales on expired sweets & ruddy patches of farmland. 

SAGITTARIUS: basements stacked with unwanted toys, a box of thin-mints, footsteps reverberating around the house when it’s 2 AM and you’re home alone, a burned down lemonade stand, that weird alien light in the third window of your neighbor’s house that never seems to get turned off, a certain rattling coming from the kitchen.

CAPRICORN: rain pummeling against damp ceilings, clothes ripped off the washing line, an empty aquarium, obscure little thrift stores that sell leather jackets from the eighties, gas station lights flirting with you from the distance, the alley where they say the vagabonds roam their night countries, sniffing up and dressing down and slitting the throats of angels.

AQUARIUS: those tiny coffee shops that fill you with nostalgia for places you’ll never visit, ‘JESUS LOVES YOU’ spray-painted across the sides of ramshackle buildings, an antique almirah scratched to high hell, a monster in the closet, the tunnel beneath the bridge that half the town believes is a gateway to hell, smoking up in trip mall parking lots. 

PISCES: halloween decor presented in shop windows a couple months early, visiting that lake where you heard that one kid drowned, the garage door slamming without cause or notice, storing fireflies in jars, drugstore makeup, birthday cake flavored oreos, a wheeled desk chair that seems to turn on its own when nobody’s in the office, a candle snuffed out on a windless evening.

A Book Recommendation

Against the Tide  by @foleypdx  

So I read this actual rollercoaster of a book about two weeks ago. I was not okay. But that’s because this story is fucking amazing. You ever read one of those stories that just seems to propel you through the pages? 

Well, if not, strap in. If you have, you know what I’m talking about, you can prep yourself. Below are my thoughts on this incredible book that I highly recommend. (It’s even got lesbians, so like, read it, you’ll love it)

Keep reading

  • what she says: i'm fine.
  • what she means: i played 4 fuckin games thinking that by the end of it desmond miles would be this unstoppable badass assassin who would single handedly save the world and turn the tide against abstergo - i thought i would get an amazing modern game where we get to jump off skyscrapers and infiltrate businesses and government buildings in abstergo's pocket and walk around hacking computers and stabbing people and then taking a nap in the animus so we could play as anscestors but noooOOOOooooooOooOoO they had to go and fuckin kill him like i didn't just spend the last 4 games getting emotionally invested in a sarcastic piece of shit bartender i cAN'T BELI E VE

Protest Against the Rising Tide of Conformity

Bob Dylan and Joan Baez by Daniel Kramer, 1964

Why some people see Donald Trump as a hero, not a bully:

So, let’s start from this point: Donald Trump is not a hero. He’s a bully.

Heroes, after all, defend the weak and marginalized against the strong and the vicious. Bullies pick on the weak and the marginalized to the benefit of the strong and the comfortable. Much like his racism, Trump’s bullying is textbook.

None of which changes for a second the fact that lots of Americans seem to think of Trump as a hero anyway. And since at least part of my job is to think about things that don’t make sense, here’s my take on why the “Hero Trump” people think the way they do.

The Hero Trump people have engaged in what can be called “privilege inversion.” Basically, they have convinced themselves that liberals and minorities have created a world in which it is substantively worse to be a white person, especially a male white person, than to be “Other.” From their point of view, political correctness and its associated practices – trigger warnings, language policing, etc. – have made victims of those who are otherwise assumed to be privileged. Thus, white people, especially men and especially Christians, are actually the abused minority group in America, victims of the PC police and a culture that regularly mocks their values and their goals.

Please don’t get me wrong: I’m not saying this has happened. I am NOT saying white male Christians are martyrs or that the PC police run the world. I AM saying that a whole lot of Trump’s supporters think this way. Hence his being an asshole makes him a hero: as Barry Goldwater once put it (in a very different context), “extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! … moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue!”

In the Trumpette worldview, the erosion of privilege makes one a martyr. Trump is King Canute (look it up!) heroically standing against the tide, and his supporters seem to believe that – unlike Canute – Trump can hold back the waves.

I Think I’m Yours

Request: “Eye colour Soulmate AU (where people are born with heterochromatic eyes, and they only revert to their genetically inherited colour when they interact with their soulmate.)”

Pairing: Newt Scamander x Reader

Word Count: 1028

Warnings: None

Originally posted by crazy-vibes-under-the-moon


Newt sifted through his writing, letting out a long, tired sigh as he looked for a certain paragraph that he had forgotten to edit. His eyes, one blue and one green, flitted across the pages lazily, only half-heartedly putting effort into the search.  

“Newt!” A voice called. “Order for Newt!”

He jumped to his feet, running a hand over his face in an attempt to push away the creeping tiredness. Editing his manuscript was such a monotonous job that even now, in the early hours of the afternoon, he longed for his bed. He came before the little lady who held out the paper bag containing his lunch and a cup of coffee. She looked up to him, doing a double take as she spotted his eyes. Then she cast a sorry gaze upon him, a sad smile tugging at her lips. Newt took the meal, ashamedly hanging his head lower as he walked back to his table. Not many people noticed, but once up close many could tell the slight significance in the hue of his eyes.

Keep reading

Today & tomorrow I’ll be introducing some of the characters from Wonder Woman: Warbringer, my new novel about Diana, Princess of the Amazons before she became the hero we know. (It arrives August 29th and you should pre-order it, yes? And save your receipt because reasons, yes?) 

First up: Alia. Alia Keralis thinks she knows who she is—loves science, bad at parties, desperate to escape her overprotective brother’s rules. But what she doesn’t know is that she comes from a line of Warbringers, descendants of Helen of Troy destined to bring about an age of bloodshed. Lots of people want Alia dead—but she has Diana on her side. 

WW Warbringer FAQ: 

Is this a graphic novel or a novel novel? It’s a novel novel. The gorgeous character art I’m sharing was created by the brilliant @jenbartel. She is magic.

Ok, so what’s the novel novel about? Here’s a link to the official summary. This is the story of Diana at age 17— the only Amazon ever born on Themyscira, the only one of her warrior sisters never tested in battle. It’s about the gods and mortals determined to use a young girl to shape the future of the world. It’s about two girls standing together against the tide of war. Expect badass ladies, Greek mythology, found family, and Diana smacking down bros on the NYC subway. 

Hold up, is this a movie novelization? No, this is my take on Diana’s story, her first contact with the mortal world, and the mythology of the Amazons. 

So there will be Amazons? Hell yeah. This way to Themyscira. 

But what about Steve Trevor? No Steve. (Sorry, Chris Pine. You seem like a swell fella!) 

Where can I get it? Pre-order here! 

Will there be pre-order swag on offer? Oh yes. Details tomorrow! 

More characters coming your way in just a bit. 

anonymous asked:

....I can't believe Lotor killed Narti. And then the generals preceded to betray him. Like, what are your thoughts on that whole development?

See, I said this before in a private ask but I think Narti’s actually gonna come back. Maybe not be “fine” but, back. I mean, she’s had a nebulous tie to the rift via Kova and for me, Haggar being able to seemingly overtake her would be even more indicative. And the rift is, uh, very prone to not leaving people dead.

Kova, who has a mental connection with Narti, remains unconcernedly by her side, like he knows she’ll be back. Kova is an empathetic creature and Narti is his dearest companion- we’d see more grief from him if there was grief to be had.

That said, I think I also understand exactly why the writers did this, for two reasons.

The Sincline ships can come together into another Voltron. At this point in the plot, they’ve turned the tide against the empire, successfully establishing their held line with Naxzela, but there’s still a long way to go- and with Zarkon back in the game things are not going to be as casual as they were under Lotor who was content to ignore the rebellion and focus on his own projects.

Being able to throw Voltron as well as the completed Sincline at it would be a huge advantage for the heroes that literally doubles their firepower.

Furthermore, Lotor’s team was too connected, too capable. If that crunch time had happened without Lotor killing Narti, after the gate failed they would’ve gone to Voltron. And then they have, again, a huge advantage- the heroes have a full actualized strike team and a whole other combining mecha that works for him.

So they have to split the team apart somehow. They have to make some divide in these people who are way too loyal to be pulled apart by anything they know is outside forces.

So Haggar takes control of Narti. So Lotor assumes he’s been betrayed, and panicking and emotionally compromised, explains nothing, gets desperate. So the generals, not understanding why that happened to Narti, with sudden silence from someone they all thought they could trust, assume they were betrayed first- so Acxa takes him down. So Lotor bolts.

The thing is this is at its core a combining mecha show. There’s no way in hell we aren’t going to see Sincline in all its glory. Because the simple fact that it exists tells us that this separation can’t actually last- because Lotor is carrying a piece of something like Voltron, something that lives to reforge itself from those pieces. Something that isn’t a consolidated whole unless it’s together.

This is the visual we’re given for where Lotor is right now: that he can’t make it. That he’s trapped by the fact that he needs the other ships, the other generals.

And Narti? Narti was his left arm. Losing Narti was the catalyst that made everything else about the team fall apart.

So- right now, this is a plot development to put Lotor where he needs to be- desperate enough to seek sanctuary with Voltron and emotionally vulnerable enough that most of his calculating defensive layers have been stripped away. But at the same time, we have the ultimate takeaway that this can’t last. That the Sincline ships have to come together.

That needs Narti. That needs the other generals.

There’s too much plot hanging on the balance.

🌊 Stem the Tide 🌊

a water based spell to stop or slow events, or to push someone back. 

To “Stem the Tide” is a nautical expression to describe ships sailing against the tide of the water, that was slowly them down. 

🌊  gather: crushed rosemary, a divination board, a representative object. 

* a divination board can be a pendulum board, ouija board, anything that has various answers

🌊  go to bathwater or a puddle, other body of water if you are landlocked.

🌊  weigh the divination board down at the bottom. 

🌊  sprinkle crushed rosemary over the water

🌊  place the representative object to float in over the center of the board. 

🌊  gather energy around your hands, perhaps even with a tempest spell. 

🌊  using your hands, influence and push the tide to move where the object is over the board. the object is like the planchette or pendulum for the board, but you are giving it the answers. 

🌊  though you cannot change the entire tide or command where a wave crashes, you affect the waters in your own way, making ripples and splashes. 

Against The Tide
Celldweller
Against The Tide

Celldweller || Against The Tide

I finally get what you’ve been saying,
Now that we’re knee deep side by side,
The storm clouds are circling above us,
As we struggle against the tide.

This sorrow weighs down on my shoulders,
This fear is getting harder to hide,
You’ll leave me alone in this darkness,
Left to hold out
Against the tide ~♫

4

Hey guys it’s finished! If you’d like to read more about this piece, I have a longer description of it in this post here. Inspired by the actions and spirit of Elizabeth Warren and women throughout history, this design is something truly special to me. I chose to incorporate elements from Watership Down, a story of survival in the darkest of worlds that touched me deeply when I was young. I want to inspire others to keep surviving and persisting, pushing back against the tide of oppression and hate. Women have changed the world a hundred times over no matter how many warnings, no matter how many explanations, and we have always persisted. We will persist.

We are doing a flash preorder for this design - it will be available until February 17th! Get yours here.

Unicorn Empire shirts are printed by hand in small batches using traditional screen printing techniques. We use only high-quality water-based inks, making our shirts uniquely soft and durable. All of our products are available in a range of straight and plus sizes at the same price.

bbc.com
Calling your husband by name for the first time - BBC News
Millions of Indian women have never used their husband's name - it's a way of showing respect for him. But campaigners are now urging some of them to change their ways.

Millions of Indian women have never used their husband’s name - it’s a way of showing their respect for him. The tradition is strictly observed in rural areas, though much less so in cities. Now, however, some campaigners are urging women in villages to give it up too.

What’s in a name? A lot, if you’re an Indian wife and the name in question is your husband’s. I learned this early on in life.

My parents were married for 73 years until my father died last year. At the time of their wedding, my mother was less than 11 and he had just turned 15.

In the decades they were together, first in a tiny village in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh and later in Kolkata (then Calcutta), she never called him by his name.

When speaking to us children, she always referred to him as “babuji” - the Hindi word for “father” that we used. When addressing him directly, she always said “Hey ho”, which means roughly “Hey you”.

As teenagers when we became aware of the fact, we made fun of her. We tried to trick her into saying his name just once. But she never did.

All the other women in my home and neighbourhood also avoided saying their husband’s name. So did tens of millions of women across India, regardless of their religion or caste.

The husband is considered equal to god so he has to be worshipped
A R Vasavi, Social anthropologist

That’s because in traditional Indian society, the husband is equated with god and a woman is taught from a young age that she must respect him.

She is told that naming her husband could invite bad luck and shorten his life. Often the ban extends to other members of his family too - and the consequences of breaking it can be serious.

One woman in the eastern state of Orissa faced retribution that was swift and harsh.

“One day my sister-in-law asked who was sitting outside. I named all the men who were there, including my husband’s uncle,” Malati Mahato says in a film produced by Video Volunteers, a pressure group.

The sister-in-law complained to the village council, which ruled Mahato’s words “reprehensible” and she was banished, with her children, to a home on the edge of the village. For the past 18 months she has been ostracised by the other villagers.

“The patriarchal hierarchy is enforced at many levels,” says social anthropologist, Prof A R Vasavi.

“The husband is considered equal to god so he has to be worshipped. In traditional matches he’s generally from a higher caste and economically supports the wife so he’s the yajman - the owner. And he’s generally older, so has to be respected on that count too.”

How Indian wives address their husbands (without using his name)

  • Women may use “father of so-and-so” or refer to their husband’s profession, eg “doctor sahib” or “vakil (lawyer) sahib”
  • They may just say “hey you”, or “you”, “will you please listen”, or “are you listening?”
  • In some Indian languages it is common to say “brother”, “elder brother”, “hello” or “owner”

Video Volunteers has now begun a campaign in some rural communities in an attempt to change patriarchal traditions.

Last October, Rohini Pawar, a volunteer in a village near the western city of Pune decided to raise the issue of naming husbands at a women’s discussion group in her village.

But before doing so, she decided she had better try it herself.

Pawar told the BBC that she was married at 15 and that in 16 years of marriage had never called her husband Prakash by his name.

“Earlier I’d call him ‘baba’, because his nephews called him that. Or I’d just say 'aaho’ ('you’ in the local Marathi language) to grab his attention.”

Prakash was relaxed about it but most other villagers weren’t happy. Some ridiculed the couple.

The women in the discussion group, however, were delighted with the idea.

He told her that if she ever dared to say his name again, he would give her a solid beating
Rohini Pawar, Activist

“We had great fun. We laughed a lot that day. For the first time in our life, we were shouting out our husbands’ names,” says Pawar, laughing.

“We decided to make a video and asked the women to say it in three different ways - happily, with anger, and with love.

"One of the women got carried away. She went home giddy with excitement and as soon as she saw her husband, she screamed out his name - and he slapped her.

"He told her that if she ever dared to say his name again, he would give her a solid beating.”

In Indian cities, over time, it has become common for wives to name their husbands. With growing female literacy, more and more women joining the workforce, and love marriages often replacing arranged ones, the tradition began to seem out-of-date.

When I married, my husband was a work colleague. I had called him by his name for years, so it would have made no sense to stop after the wedding.

But A R Vasavi says this still only applies to a “very small segment” of Indian households.

“It’s the educated, assertive woman in big cities who calls her husband by name,” she says.

“It’s unthinkable for tens of millions of women in rural India and even in conservative urban homes. If a new bride tries to go against the tide, she’s swiftly admonished by her mum-in-law or other elderly women.”

Rohini Pawar says the hostile response from many in her village has only strengthened the resolve of the women in her group to continue challenging patriarchal traditions.

“You see, change is not easy. People ask us why is it so important for us to use their names - what’s the big deal?” she says.

“I think, until you confront the small issue, how will you challenge the larger, more important issues?”

It may seem like a small step, but it’s the first step, she says, and the first step is always a big one.

youtube

NASA - Seaweed Farms in South Korea

The dark squares that make up the checkerboard pattern in this image are fields of a sort—fields of seaweed. Along the south coast of South Korea, seaweed is often grown on ropes, which are held near the surface with buoys. This technique ensures that the seaweed stays close enough to the surface to get enough light during high tide but doesn’t scrape against the bottom during low tide.

Door Struggles

Critters asked: How many cumulative hours has Vox Machina fought with doors on stream?

It’s impossible to say in in-game time because some of it wasn’t measured in neat 6-second rounds. We can, however, measure real life time! For this (and for fun), we decided to include some barriers and portals that functioned as doors as well. We didn’t include doors that didn’t pose a threat to Vox Machina. Updated to Episode 85.

Time Spent Dealing With Doors and Barriers: 4:11:13

Thanks to icecream-s-coops, @JacobSBrowning, @_miss_maria_, Monique S., and our past volunteers for their work compiling this list!

Keep reading

Which Generation Are You From?

Many people like to think that their preferences and choices are their own. But to what extent is that really true? How much autonomy do we really have to make our own decisions?

If you know about MBTI and Enneagram, you already know that these two orientations of personality can make a huge impact on the style with which you approach life and the direction you choose. However, one theory, the Strauss-Howe generational theory proposes that even the timing of our birth can cause us to take on the attributes of the our generation’s zeitgeist in cycles of 4.

There are 4 different generation archetypes: the prophets, nomads, heroes and artists. The emergence of these archetypes are centered around two distinct periods of heavy activity.

The first distinct period of heavy activity is described as the crisis, where “institutional life is destroyed and rebuilt in response to a perceived threat to the nation’s survival. Civic authority revives, cultural expression redirects towards community purpose, and people begin to locate themselves as members of a larger group”.

The second distinct period of heavy activity is described as the awakening, when “institutions are attacked in the name of personal and spiritual autonomy. Just when society is reaching its high tide of public progress, people suddenly tire of social discipline and want to recapture a sense of self-awareness, spirituality and personal authenticity.”

Prophet generations are born near the end of a Crisis, during a time of rejuvenated community life and consensus around a new societal order. Prophets grow up as the increasingly indulged children of this post-Crisis era, come of age as self-absorbed young crusaders of an Awakening, focus on morals and principles in midlife, and emerge as elders guiding another Crisis.

Nomad generations are born during an Awakening, a time of social ideals and spiritual agendas, when young adults are passionately attacking the established institutional order. Nomads grow up as under-protected children during this Awakening, come of age as alienated, post-Awakening adults, become pragmatic midlife leaders during a Crisis, and age into resilient post-Crisis elders.

Hero generations are born after an Awakening, a time of individual pragmatism, self-reliance, and let-things-be attitude. Heroes grow up as increasingly protected post-Awakening children, come of age as team-oriented young optimists during a Crisis, emerge as energetic, overly-confident midlifers, and age into politically powerful elders attacked by another Awakening.

Artist generations are born during a Crisis, a time when great dangers cut down social and political complexity in favor of public consensus, aggressive institutions, and an ethic of personal sacrifice. Artists grow up overprotected by adults preoccupied with the Crisis, come of age as the socialized and conformist young adults of a post-Crisis world, break out as process-oriented midlife leaders during an Awakening, and age into thoughtful post-Awakening elders.

So how does this correspond with our present day? Keeping note that the age ranges of these generations are not set by any one authority, we are still able to see the formation of a plausible model that fits within the generational trends we see today.

Baby Boomers, who would be between 52 and 70 in 2016, would be the Prophets. They experienced unprecedented good fortune within their youth having been born in an economy post-world war 2.

Generation X, would be between 35 and 51 in 2016, would be the Nomads. Think The Breakfast Club.

Generation Y, or millennial, 18 and 34 in 2016, would be the Heroes. The millennials were the last generation to see life without the internet yet on the cusp of new changes with technology. The Hero Generation comes of age during a crisis period, and with the emergence of The Great Recession and issues like ISIS, it makes sense that we are currently in a crisis period.

Generation Z, will include those below 18 and those who have yet to be born, featuring as the Artist generation.

What we can learn from observing these theories, is that each archetype is formed in response to the previous generations. Generation X incited a spiritual movement from the lack of soul within the strong and cold institutions they saw. The Baby Boomers sought to create unity as embodiments of society’s idealistic visions for the future. These different generations of people were all influenced by their predecessors and their births at specific periods of time. The personalities of these people, despite likely seeing themselves as autonomous individuals with their own goals, created a unique faction that represented an overlying message. It makes you wonder what our personalities could have been like, given the same experiences as our predecessors, what our dreams and goals would be like and whether we would understand people from different generations more.

Given these theories of MBTI, Enneagram and Strauss-Howe generational theory, we can almost get a sense that we don’t choose our own destinies, but our destinies choose us. The real battle may be a matter of whether we choose to embrace our roles or fight against the tides.