African-History

Can we talk about American Gods? We really have a dark-skin black woman playing a Biblical Queen and a Love Goddess. We have Black People portraying Egyptian Gods. The lead of the show is black. They have West African Gods being portrayed on mainstream media. Seeing black people’s mythology and history represented on screen by black actors is a big thing. People aren’t even aware of nor regard the several figures in Abrahamic religions being African. .

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February 11th 1990: Mandela released

On this day in 1990, the South African activist and politician Nelson Mandela was released from prison. Mandela had spent twenty-seven years in prison for his role as an anti-apartheid activist at the head of Umkhonto we Sizwe, which translates as Spear of the Nation. The controversial organisation served as the militant armed wing of the African National Congress political party, born out of a frustration among anti-apartheid activists that their non-violence was met with brutality by white authorities against black citizens. Mandela was arrested in 1962 and sentenced to life in prison, during which time he was largely condemned as a terrorist by Western nations. He served most of his twenty-seven years on Robben Island, then Victor Verster Prison near Cape Town, and during his imprisonment his reputation grew as a significant black leader both in South Africa and internationally. Mandela was finally freed after the ban on the ANC was lifted by the apartheid government. Upon his release, Mandela led the ANC in the successful negotiations with President F.W. de Klerk to end apartheid, and was overwhelmingly elected President of South Africa in the first multi-racial elections in 1994, serving until 1999. In 2013, Nelson Mandela died aged 95 and has been mourned around the world as a hero who fought for freedom in South Africa, and as a symbol of resistance for oppressed peoples everywhere.

“Our march to freedom is irreversible. We must not allow fear to stand in our way.”

For decades, there have been few photographic images of Harriet Tubman depicting how the abolitionist and Civil War spy looked in her lifetime.

Now there’s one more.

New York City auction house Swann Galleries has announced that it will auction a newly discovered photo of Tubman March 30.

Kate Clifford Larson, author of the biography “Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero,” estimated that Tubman was between 43 and 46 years old when the photo was taken, placing it shortly after the end of the Civil War. At the time, Tubman was living in Auburn, where she had purchased land in 1859 from then-Sen. William H. Seward — land that will soon become the Harriet Tubman National Historical Park.

Larson said that in her 20 years of researching Tubman, she’s been sent dozens of photos of black women by people claiming to have discovered a new image of the soon-to-be face of the $20. But not one has actually depicted Tubman.

Someone today tried to tell me that the Songhai Empire (one of the most powerful in African history) shouldn’t count as a historically black kingdom because it was “built and ruled by Arabs”. I had made a comment about historically black kingdoms in response to someone’s “WE WUZ KANGS” joke and this redpilled motherfucker thought he knew better than me.

For those who don’t know, the Songhai are an ethnic group in Western Africa who are, you guessed it, black. Songhai built the empire, Songhai lived in it, Songhai fought for it, and Songhai ruled it. I don’t even know if I’m using the proper grammar for that but at least I fucking know what it means.

And then he had the sheer dumbass gall to call my assessment inaccurate and claim that I’m a dirty SJW historical revisionist. I’m not even an SJW. I usually can’t stand SJWs, to be completely honest. 

I’m just a fucker who likes historical accuracy.

Tell me again how Askia the Great wasn’t black, shithead.

Oh but that wasn’t all, because apparently MALI wasn’t a black empire either.

You may remember Mali. It was the fabulously rich kingdom ruled by black, Muslim Western Africans, most notably Mansa Musa. He was the man who, thanks to his ridiculous wealth and charity during his Hajj to Mecca changed the price of gold throughout the ENTIRE MEDITERRANEAN:

Oh and also Ethiopia didn’t count either because the Jewish kingdoms there were “semites, not blacks” and Haile Selassie was “too modern to count”.

Now first off, the Jews in Ethiopia are like 99% black. They’re called Beta Israel (Beyte Yisreal in Hebrew) and they’ve been black since the beginning. 

Even ignoring that vital fact, that statement forgets about the ENTIRE GIDEON DYNASTY, rulers of the Kingdom of Semien from around 400 AD to 1627 AD, when their Kingdom was absorbed into the Ethiopian Empire ruled by ANOTHER BLACK DYNASTY HOLY HELL WHO’D HAVE THUNK IT, THE SOLOMONIC DYNASTY.

So apparently Haile Selassie (Solomonic Dynasty),

Queen Gudit (or Yodit) of Semien (Gideon Dynasty),

and Menelik II (Solomonic Dynasty, the dude who beat a modernized Italian invasion with guerrilla tactics, spears, and a few muskets), among a hundred other rulelrs,

don’t count as historical black rulers because this anti-SJW son of a bitch couldn’t be bothered to read a goddamn history book and started pulling shit outta his contrarian ass.

And then he tried to pull the whole “oh the Egyptians were BROWN not BLACK lololol you sjw scum” thing.

THE ENTIRE 25TH DYNASTY WAS BLACK. They were ALL from Nubian Kush, and they oversaw some of Egypt’s most prosperous periods, as well as one of the great pyramid-building crazes.

But the best part of this was when he tried to tell me that the capital of the Kingdom of Great Zimbabwe,  pictured below, was nothing more than “a glorified medieval peasant’s hut”. 

(For scale, those big walls are up to five meters (or 16 feet) high and built without mortar. They’re held up by masterful architecture alone.)

IT WAS A CITY OF UP TO EIGHTEEN THOUSAND PEOPLE,

Go fuck yourself, whatever your name was. Fuck off back to your echo chamber and leave history to the grownups. 

“Heywood offers a complex and layered narrative that significantly enhances our knowledge about Njinga, the memorable ruler who defied colonial power in seventeenth-century Central Africa. In addition to being a tour de force of historical analysis that will mesmerize scholars, this powerful and moving book will delight Njinga’s many admirers, for the African queen occupies a vital place both in the national identity of Angola and in the memory of people of African descent in the Americas.”

The First Americans Were Africans by Dr. David Imhotep, PhD

Nationwide (January 31, 2014) – Is Ancient America nothing more than the missing pages of Black history? Perhaps so! New documented insights are being brought forward by Dr. David Imhotep Ph.D., former nutritionist of Muhammad Ali, and author of The First Americans Were Africans: Documented Evidence. He is quickly changing the ancient imagined faces of America and replacing them with astounding myth busting evidence of who the first Americans really were. On the eve of Black history month we thought it fitting to recalibrate Black history not as a tragic side note of American history but the very foundation of America and its rise as a global power.

Here are ten well assumed American myths dismantled by his profound research:

1. The first Americans were Indians - Ok, this is the one everyone knows to be true right? Dr. Imhotep’s book gives detailed evidence about this fact. He says there are tens thousands of years of African travels to the Americas before the Indians arrived.

2. Columbus discovered America - This is a very old argument that most people have given up on. Columbus’s journeys were noteworthy for a number of reasons but “discovery” should not be attached to any of them.

3. Whites were the first to conduct international trade - This is very hard for most modern Americans to imagine international trade without White Americans involved, but it existed for thousands of years before they were in existence. The Pier and Harbor at Bimini, Bahamas substantiates this.

4. The mound builders were Native Americans - Some American mounds are clearly the work of master builders, but they were not Indians. This is one fact the Smithsonian does not advertise.

5. Vikings discovered America - We already destroyed this one, but to make it clear: the first European people in America were not the first to discover it. They were among the last to discover the New World behind the Africans and Asians.

6. Pilgrims were the first farmers in America - Was it not the Native Americans who saved the Pilgrims from starving their first winter with the crops they grew?

7. White people built the first roads and canals in America - Roads and canals were built by Africans far before Europeans came. Some can still be seen in southwestern USA.

8. The first Eskimos were Asians - Oh…come on Dr. Imhotep, you’ve got to be kidding me–is what you are probably thinking about this one right? The answer… two words: documented evidence! Documentation trumps conversation, and the evidence clearly shows the original Eskimo’s really were not from Asia.

9. The first Black Africans were brought to America during the Slave Trade - In the Americas; this is a standard and tragic myth because it turns out that the ancestors of many of the people brought here during slavery were already well established in the travels to America for tens of thousands of years.

10. European White people were the first iron makers in the Americas - When it comes to European Americans, in American history, we love to give credit where it just isn't due. Africans were the first iron makers in the Americas and early Europe many years before White folks ever arrived.


These claims are easily substantiated with evidence in every case. In short, Dr. Imhotep has laid out the blueprint for correcting American History and every American should be willing to learn about their first founding fathers. This is the foundation of the America we know and love and everyone should be proud of our collective African heritage. It’s also a part of what makes us great! So this Black History Month we should also celebrate the contributions of the great “African American” founders who made it possible for others to walk in their shadows even while they were being written out of history. In short, we should celebrate Black history every day because without Black history there is really no American history, it’s really that simple!

Dr. David Imhotep is America’s First PhD in Ancient African History and author of the book “Africans Were The First Americans: Documented Evidence”. For more information or to schedule him for an interview, please contact Marcus Malcolm at (302) 536-9642 or info@bettermarketingmastery.com

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March 21st 1960: Sharpeville massacre

On this day in 1960, police opened fire on peaceful anti-apartheid protestors in the South African township of Sharpeville, killing 69. The over 5,000 strong crowd gathered at Sharpeville police station to protest the discriminatory pass laws, which they claimed were designed to limit their movement in designated white only areas. The laws required all black men and women to carry reference books with their name, tax code and employer details; those found without their book could be arrested and detained. The protest encouraged black South Africans to deliberately leave their pass books at home and present themselves at police stations for arrest, which would crowd prisons and lead to a labour shortage. Despite the protestors’ peaceful and non-violent intentions, police opened fire on the crowd. By the day’s end, 69 people were dead and 180 were wounded. A further 77 were arrested and questioned, though no police officer involved in the massacre was ever convicted as the government relieved all officials of any responsibility. The apartheid government responded to the massacre by banning public meetings, outlawing the African National Congress (ANC) and declaring a state of emergency. The incident convinced anti-apartheid leader and ANC member Nelson Mandela to abandon non-violence and organise paramilitary groups to fight the racist system of apartheid. In 1996, 36 years later, then President Mandela chose Sharpeville as the site at which he signed into law the country’s new post-apartheid constitution.

“People were running in all directions, some couldn’t believe that people had been shot, they thought they had heard firecrackers. Only when they saw the blood and dead people, did they see that the police meant business”
- Tom Petrus, eyewitness to the Sharpeville massacre

The bourgeoisie in the United States appears to be giving a concession. They are saying, “Okay, fine, you go ahead and study African history and African culture,” and they will give you so much African history and culture [that] you just have time for nothing else. The object is to divorce the process of thought and reflection on our past from the process of changing the present so that you feel that you’ve gained something but you end up in some remarkable contradiction. What you will find is this (in fact it’s happening already): Rockefeller–who is making most of his money out of South African gold, out of the Rand, out of exploiting and participating in apartheid, the most vicious racial system in the world–that guy is going to finance a chair in African history. That’s the type of contradiction. So that if a black progressive thinks he’s doing something by going into African history, using up a Rockefeller grant, all he is doing is forgetting both the domestic and external implications of American capitalism and, in fact, supporting that system because the guys don’t mind if you go in a library or museum and lock yourself up all day. That’s wonderful; keep you off the street, keep you out of struggle. So we have to avoid that type of myth that cultural revival, per se, is going to carry us a long way. I don’t want to seem to be critical of the development of interest in African history and culture. Quite obviously not, that’s what I myself am involved in. What I am trying to suggest is that sometimes, while involved in a process, we ourselves have to be very careful to delimit how far that process should go. Let’s all wear afros, let’s put on African clothes. Fine. But that doesn’t mean we are not going to struggle. The system still has to be broken before we can express ourselves in any fundamental way.
—  “African History in the Service of the Black Liberation”, Walter Rodney
en.wikipedia.org
Romans in Sub-Saharan Africa - Wikipedia

Romans in Sub-Saharan Africa were a group of expeditions & explorations to Lake Chad and western Africa. These expeditions were done by a group of military and commercial units of Romans who moved across the Sahara Desert and into the interior of Africa and its coast. They were made by the Roman Empire between the first and the fourth century AD. One of the main reasons of the explorations, according to academics like Jonathan Roth, was to procure gold and spices…

Why didn’t I learn about this in history class?! This is fascinating.

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History of Africa; Every Year

anyways don’t reblog from @indomitablekushite for your history lessons or justice movement because they looked at a plea from coptic christians for acknowledgement and aid and were like ‘if you’re christian you can’t be egyptian, real egyptians are pagan’ despite the fact that kemeticism isn’t practiced in egypt anymore, and despite the fact that ‘coptic christians can’t be egyptians’ was exactly the rhetoric used to support the bombing of two churches on palm sunday that killed over forty people and injured over one hundred. they then went on to call any arab people addressing this ‘white privileged arab rats’ and think they, a non-egyptian, have more right to egyptian culture than a coptic egyptian, coptics being the oldest ethnic egyptian group to this day. let me just reiterate in case you missed it: they looked at forty dead and one hundred wounded egyptians and used this as their soapbox to talk about how coptic christians are secretly white oppressors who are descendants of colonialists despite the fact that christianity has been in egypt for thousands of years and the form of christianity that exists in egypt is nothing like western christianity and never has been. but they still claim to be pro-african… as long as you don’t disagree with them and aren’t christian because you’re not a Real African if you don’t worship ra, regardless of whether or not you were born in africa.