Addo

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Herd of friendly elephants including some youngsters, Addo Elephant National Park, South Africa

Some practice to keep myself from being lazy after moving.
A random veteran wolf spending his time with his youngest daughter and @koraru-san’s little bad boy Addo because I realized I haven’t drawn feline that much so I want to practice (Hope I didn’t butcher your baby Caracal).

May the wind guide your wings!
-Aquila Silverwings-🦅

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Giant African Land Snail on wet tarmac road (South Africa) by Steve Lamb
Via Flickr:
The Giant African Land Snail (Achatina fulica) - this is a young one as it wasn’t nearly as big as they can be (up to eight inches long). We found this one crossing the road, in a rain storm, and he was probably three or four inches long. Interesting colors and markings. Even when you are looking for elephants and other big mammals you have to be aware of what’s about. Addo Elephant National Park (Eastern Cape Province) South Africa.

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Little Big Boy by 一把阳光
An Elephant calf ( Loxodonta Africana ) in Addo Elephant National Park, South Africa

St. Louis workers remove portion of 103-year-old Confederate statue

  • Workers removed a portion of a 38-foot-tall granite monument honoring Confederate soldiers and sailors in St. Louis’ Forest Park on Thursday, according to the Associated Press, but it may take weeks for the rest of the statue to come down.
  • Koran Addo, a spokesman for Mayor Lyda Krewson, told the AP that while work crews had hauled away the tip of the monument, it was unclear when the rest would be removed.
  • The 103-year-old monument shows a Confederate soldier leaving his family to go fight in the Civil War, flanked by an angel. 
  • An inscription in the stone reads, “in memory of the soldiers and sailors of the Confederate States By the United Daughters of the Confederacy of Saint Louis.” Read more (6/9/17)

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Poi jamme a Marechiar’
Te port’ addo’ vuo’ tu
Parlammo chianu chian’
It’s me and you.
—  Tu t'e scurdat’ ‘e me, Liberato. @liberato1926

You been following me for a long time. thanks for that. And keep the good work of your blog going.



Oh my god I love it!

Thank you so much.

And I know it’s been a while but I Pinkie Promise I”m working on an update. I’m just feeling tired and burned out a lot lately.

(If you like Pirates and Diamond Dogs and weird stories go check out http://askcaptaindrog.tumblr.com/ )

anonymous asked:

Omg you study latin! I'm having a hard time with it,do you have any advise on translating?

oh boy oh boy oh boy, welcome welcome welcome. grab some tea because this may or may not be long.

1. the vocabulary

- first things first, memorise the vocabulary, correctly. by correctly. I mean, not just memorising the 1st person version of the word [addo: I add] but the principle parts too [addo, addere [infinitive], addidi, additus/um]. You’ll need these. especially with the irregulars that look super weird in different tenses and you’ll be like ??? what is that????

- memorise the irregulars and their principle parts [thank god there are only six].

- memorise the endings for the present stem.

latin verbs from the present stem end regularly

o/m, s, t, mus, tis, nt.

[I, you, he/she/it, we, you, they] respectively.

2. the grammar

- know your tenses, especially for the irregulars. there’s nothing worse than translating an entire text in present tense when it should be in perfect tense.

- KNOW YOUR DECLENSIONS AND CASES!!!! MEMORISE THE ENDINGS FOR EACH DECLENSION AND CASE, AND KNOW WHAT EACH CASE DOES!!!! THAT’S SO IMPORTANT ESPECIALLY WITH SNEAKY DATIVES AND GENITIVES.

- KNOW THE STEMS OF THE VOCAB SO ITS EASIER TO FIGURE OUT THE MEANING OF A WORD EVEN IN A WEIRD TENSE OR SOMETHIN THAT’S WHERE THE PRINCIPLE PARTS COME ON A LOT OF THE TIME THEY’RE NEEDED TO HELP YOU FIGURE OUT WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON.

- TAKE IT CLAUSE BY CLAUSE IF THE SENTENCES ARE WEIRD AS HELL.

- TRANSLATING LATIN IS LIKE CRACKING A CODE.

1. figure out what the words mean and the tense in each sentence/clause

2. figure out the declension of the words and which words agree with each other and hence the cases. add in any prepositions if needed [cough dative cough].

   nothing worse than ‘I gave my child to the bottle’ when it’s supposed to be [I gave my bottle to my child]

  use sense if you can’t decode the agreements and the cases. but please try and memorise them before hand it’ll save you time and stress.

3. put it in the correct order

4. translate.

yay.

needless to say, there are tons of things you need to think about. and at first it’s overwhelming, but soon it becomes your automatic reaction to translations. good luck babe, let me know how it goes x