ARUP

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Behold the world’s tallest free-standing tower of dominos! Measuring 5.275 meters (17.3 feet) tall and made of 2,688 dominos, this awesome structure is the work of Tom Holmes, a structural engineer working at Arup, a design and engineering consultancy firm in Bristol, England.

Tom spent 7.5 hours carefully assembling his record-breaking domino tower. The actual construction took place after Tom and his colleague Roland Trim spent months of careful planning.

‘Like on any project, we tested our theories before starting construction,’ Mr Trim told Arup.com ‘Armed with that simple logic, we could start to design complex structures that would be able to reach great heights and stand up by themselves.’

The final result dwarfed the previous record holder by almost 20cm and would tower above the average double decker bus by over a metre.

‘As engineers, we’re constantly looking for creative solutions to solve problems so it’s great to put my skills to use in a fun task like this,’ he explained. It’s not every day that you can say you’ve built the world’s largest domino tower.’

Tom and Roland are now planning how to successfully break their own record by building a 6 meter (19.7 foot) tall domino tower. Good luck gentlemen, we hope you succeed!

[via Metro.co.uk]

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Arup Develops 3D Printing Technique for Structural Steel | Via

A team lead by Arup has developed a method of designing and 3D Printing steel joints which will significantly reduce the time and cost needed to make complex nodes in tensile structures. Their research is being touted as “a whole new direction for the use of additive manufacturing” which provides a way of taking 3D printing “firmly into the realm of real-world, hard hat construction.”

Aside from creating more elegant components which express the forces within each individual joint, the innovation could potentially reduce costs, cut waste and slash the carbon footprint of the construction sector.

Salomé Galjaard, the team leader at Arup, commented: “By using additive manufacturing we can create lots of complex individually designed pieces far more efficiently. This has tremendous implications for reducing costs and cutting waste. But most importantly, this approach potentially enables a very sophisticated design, without the need to simplify the design in a later stage to lower costs.”

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Fast Track
Crossrail Place, Canary Wharf: Foster + Partners

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Arup Develops 3D Printing Technique for Structural Steel ~ archdaily.com

A team lead by Arup has developed a method of designing and 3D Printing steel joints which will significantly reduce the time and cost needed to make complex nodes in tensile structures. Their research is being touted as “a whole new direction for the use of additive manufacturing” which provides a way of taking 3D printing “firmly into the realm of real-world, hard hat construction.”

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ARUP Envisions the Skyscrapers of 2050 via BDonline

In 2050 skyscrapers will be continuously adapting and made from materials that will do everything from filtering air to producing energy.

This is the vision of the future presented this week by Arup in its new report ‘It’s Alive!’.

Among other things, the engineering firm imagines buildings with modular components that can be upgraded and rearranged over time by robots.

Josef Hargrave, foresight and innovation consultant at Arup, said: “In the ecological age, buildings do not simply create spaces, they craft environments.”

Food production will respond to local demand and photovoltaic surfaces will enable on-site production and storage of energy.

The building’s façade will react to changing environmental conditions and people will travel via pedestrian bridges, cable cars and transport hubs.

Hargrave added: “By producing food and energy, and providing clean air and water, buildings evolve from being passive shells, into adaptive and breathing structures supporting the cities of tomorrow.”