ARPANET

JIM HENSON
I think Ms. Rand and my character Oscar the Grouch would have a lot to talk about actually. I am laughing out loud at this idea.


AYN RAND
Why would I want to talk to him. What has he achieved or trying to achieve.

JIM HENSON
He has achieved what I think is the ultimate goal of your way of thinking.

JIM HENSON
Isolation. Contempt for others. A hard heart. Yet even he can muster a bit of empathy every now and then.

AYN RAND
I am not isolated. I have no contempt for others. Millions of people read my books and find my thoughts inspirational. I hardly spend my time on the sidelines in a trash can grumping.

JIM HENSON
Not yet anyway.

—  Jim Henson and Ayn Rand, along with Yoko Ono and Sidney Nolan, converse on ARPANET, 1976
2

What the internet looked like in 1969


On Oct 29, 1969, UCLA and the Stanford Research Institute made the first host-to-host connection on the ARPANET, which grew into the internet that we all know and love today!

You can see some of the log files from 1969 that marked that occasion. And while we’re here, you might be interested in looking at our historical archives or the first of several new research initiatives.

“JIM HENSON:
I think Ms. Rand and my character Oscar the Grouch would have a lot to talk about actually. I am la

ughing out loud at this idea.

AYN RAND:
Why would I want to talk to him. What has he achieved or trying to achieve.

JIM HENSON:
He has achieved what I think is the ultimate goal of your way of thinking.

JIM HENSON:
Isolation. Contempt for others. A hard heart. Yet even he can muster a bit of empathy every now and then.

AYN RAND:
I am not isolated. I have no contempt for others. Millions of people read my books and find my thoughts inspirational. I hardly spend my time on the sidelines in a trash can grumping.

JIM HENSON:
Not yet anyway.”

ROSALIND KRAUSS: Clearly you understand the value of the archive. The magazine I’m working on is called October.

JUAN DOWNEY: Why October.

JOSEPH BEUYS: Oktoberfest.

JUAN DOWNEY: And yes who is it for. A beer magazine.

ROSALIND KRAUSS: After the Eisenstein film.

JUAN DOWNEY: Haha. Oh yes.

—  Rosalind Krauss, Joseph Beuys and Juan Downey, “The ARPANET test,” a proto-Internet dialogue held in March 1976, just before the publication of October’s first issue.

The Network

In·ter·net
 /ˈintərˌnet/ 
   1.    A global computer network providing a variety of information and communication facilities, consisting of interconnected networks using standardized communication protocols.

Back in 1957. The Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first satellite. This caused a lot concern because if the Soviets could launch an object into orbit, they could very easily launch a missile at the United States. The president during this time was Dwight D. Eisenhower. He established the Advanced Research Projects Agency in 1958 as a response to the Soviets launching Sputnik. A key mission of ARPA was to develop computer science. In the 1950’s computers were massive machines which filled rooms and could only perform minimal operations at a time, and most were used for reading punch cards or magnetic reels of tape. ARPA set out to expand their capabilities. They hired a company called Bolt, Beranek, and Newman to develop a network linking four computers running on different operating systems. This network was called ARPANET. ARPANET established many of the protocols that are still used today such as the IP (Internet Protocol) Address and the File Transfer Protocol. Without this accomplishment it may have been decades before anyone tried linking computers via a network.

Written by Eric Doerr for History Salon.

Sources:

youtube

SEBASTIEN TELLIER - KILOMETER (ARPANET REMIX).

Jim Henson, Sidney Nolan, Yoko Ono and Ayn Rand discuss puppets
  • YOKO ONO:I would love to appear on one of your television programs Mr Henson.
  • AYN RAND:why?
  • YOKO ONO:They are very funny and I like how the puppets get on.
  • JIM HENSON:Thank you its kind of you to say so. Im also a fan of yours and John Lennons music.
  • SIDNEY NOLAN:Who is your favourite puppet from the line of characters you have created Jim.
  • YOKO ONO:Thank you. John loves your programmes too.
  • JIM HENSON:Each character is special for me they represent different aspects of myself. Kermit the frog is perhaps closest to me. An altar ego of sorts.
  • AYN RAND:What does that say about you.
  • SIDNEY NOLAN:Big laughs. He is exceptional.
  • JIM HENSON:I dont know. I don’t think too much about it.
  • YOKO ONO:My favourite is Big Bird. He is so tall and gentle.
  • AYN RAND:To be honest I find it to be senseless entertainment. I prefer the celebration of men and what they can achieve.
  • JIM HENSON:Do you have children Ms Rand.
The Department Of Defense Wants Control Of The Internet Back

This may seem totalitarian, but they did give us the whole thing, so they may have a point. Via M.I.T.’s Technology Review:

The U.S. Department of Defense may have funded the research that led to the Internet, but freewheeling innovation created the patchwork of privately owned technology that makes up the Internet today. Now the U.S. government is trying to wrest back some control, as it adjusts to an era when cyberattacks on U.S. corporations and government agencies are common.

At the RSA computer security conference yesterday, representatives of the White House, U.S. Department of Defense, and National Security Agency said that safeguarding U.S. interests required them to take a more active role in governing what has been a purely commercial, civilian resource. But some experts are concerned that the growing influence of defense and military organizations on the operation and future development of the Internet will compromise the freedom that has made it a success.

great…. another threat to the internet as we know it.

A Map of the first Internet (via Gizmodo)

This is Arpanet. The internet before Google. Before Flickr, before YouTube, before Chat Roulette, before BitTorrent. Before pictures of your ex-girlfriend on Facebook. An internet that you could draw a map of with only a few lines and some dots. 1972.

At this point, the internet wasn’t even the internet—still dubbed ARPANET, the Pentagon (and a handful of universities’) private plaything. As you can see, it wasn’t exactly… extensive. The network served only to link key research centers. It’s pretty amazing to think that this smattering of cables turned into the bizarre, twisted, incredibly complex nebula of porn, parody, knowledge hatred, joy, and cat videos we now adore. [Life]

ARPANET’s coming out party: when the Internet first took center stage

The unveiling of the precursor to the internet:

Monday morning October 24 arrived. Conference attendees meandered into the exhibition. One sat down at a computer, followed some instructions, and tried to access a computer that most likely wasn’t operational at the moment.

“HOST DEAD,” came the line response.

“Oh, my God. I’ve killed it!” he cried out in a panic.

Another two attendees sat down at machines and had an experience that would be shared by millions of cell phone texters three decades later. They both logged into the University of Utah host and accessed the TALK protocol.

“Where are you?” one typed.

“I’m in Washington,” the other replied.

“Where?”

“At the Hilton.”

“Well, I’m at the Hilton too.”

They were, of course, practically sitting next to each other.

More at Ars Technica