A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

The original “Freddy Snake” unintentionally came out looking too phallic. The crew only had one hour to film the scene so they didn’t have enough time to paint it. So, it was covered in a green goo substance to overcome the “pinkish hue.”

A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987)

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The Influence of Ray Harryhausen on Horror:

In 2013, the world lost one of the most influential visual effects creators of all time.  Ray Harryhausen perfected a method of stop motion known as “Dynamation”, which he used in various landmark films, such as Mighty Joe Young (1949), The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958), and Jason and the Argonauts (1963), as seen above.

His work has inspired many animators over the years, and provided the impetus for stop motion animation to be used to create entire feature-length films, such as Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993), right up to the works of Laika, LLC., who produced 2009’s Coraline, as well as the upcoming Box Trolls (2014). 

His influence has also spurred on numerous homages in films from nearly every genre, including horror.  In 1987, Freddy Krueger returned to theaters and nightmares the world over in A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors.  In a clear nod to the skeletal warriors from Jason and the Argonauts, Freddy’s spirit briefly inhabits his mortal remains in an effort to keep them from being properly buried, and thus put to rest.  In 1992, director Sam Raimi would make an even more obvious reference to the same warriors in his horror/fantasy epic, Army of Darkness.

“I think all of us who are practioners in the arts of science fiction and fantasy movies now all feel that we’re standing on the shoulders of a giant.  If not for Ray’s contribution to the collective dreamscape, we wouldn’t be who we are.”
- James Cameron