A Face in the Crowd

Oh HAIIIII, Dirty South!!!! We will be returning to @TomorrowWorld Sep 25-27 to close out the summer festival season in epic fashion once again! 🔥 Hope to see some of the same faces from last year’s lovely crowd 😍 #tomorrowworld #familyphoto

Fun Fact About Thomas Jefferson #311:

Thomas Jefferson once ate 51 cards as onlookers watched in astonishment. He reached for the last card when suddenly, a pigeon dropped dead at his feet. He cradled the bird in his long arms, dropping to his knees as he glowed a deep purple.
And no sooner than that, the pigeon revived. He placed the pigeon in the hands of a young woman, who was now facing the crowd of frightened citizens.
The woman reached in her pocket to reveal a 9 of diamonds.
“Is this your card?” Asked the pigeon in a deep voice.

And so, every Canada Day, we try to forget that that ever happened.

When You Are Old

When you are old and grey and full of sleep.
And nodding by the fire, take down this book.
And slowly read, and dream of the soft look
Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep.
How many loved your moments of glad grace.
And loved your beauty with love false or true.
But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you.
And loved the sorrows of your changing face;
And bending down beside the glowing bars,
Murmur, a little sadly, how Love fled
And paced upon the mountains overhead
And hid his face amid a crowd of stars.

—-Yeats (in 1893)

#Chinese#painting#drawing#pencilsketch#illustration#ancient#EmpressWu#poem#poetry#Irish#poet#Yeats#WhenYouAreOld

Never has there been such loneliness in the midst of crowds, never such hunger in the face of satiation. Never has there been a more fertile ground for the seed and the harvest the Lord spoke of. All that is needed is a bearer of the Good News who speaks it with such authenticity that it can penetrate the most exhausted hearing, revive the most jaded language.
—  Walker Percy
You Can't Cheer for Laverne and Boo Jennicet

Jennicet Gutiérrez is the first transgender person to publicly call out the president around immigration and the torture and rape transgender immigrants often experience inside detention centers. Gutiérrez was in a room full of national LGBT leaders who gathered to celebrate the many accomplishments of the movement. You would imagine this would be a place to feel seen, safe, and validated. That was not the case.

As soon as Gutiérrez proceeded to speak truth and ask the President as to why he is not releasing our trans detainees who face violence, the crowd began to jeer, boo, and hiss. As she continued, the crowd then began to drown her and chant, “OBAMA! OBAMA!”

A transgender woman of color and undocumented leader in the immigrant rights and LGBT movement was booed and silenced by not only the state, but by the very same movement that purports to uplift and celebrate the transgender community.

As her voice, filled with passion and conviction, broke through the White House room, she was met by negativity, intolerance, and stares of disapproval from her peers. Her voice was carried by the thousands of transgender women considered disposable by the nation, facing deportation, detention, and brutal transphobic violence.

Her voice and visibility in that moment was shunned and shamed as inappropriate by a roomful of leaders who then applauded as the President lamented violence against transgender women of color, violence that his actions have contributed to by not taking action against the detention centers. Her voice is one of few transgender women of color immigrants who are bringing national visibility to this issue of the detention centers. Her voice carried the weight of the communities who are screaming inside detention centers demanding to be freed. Her voice was heard and ridiculed by many who claim to fight for transgender communities and also are involved in LGBT immigrant rights issues.

Read more.

Jennicet Gutiérrez is the first transgender person to publicly call out the president around immigration and the torture and rape transgender immigrants often experience inside detention centers. Gutiérrez was in a room full of national LGBT leaders who gathered to celebrate the many accomplishments of the movement. You would imagine this would be a place to feel seen, safe, and validated. That was not the case.

As soon as Gutiérrez proceeded to speak truth and ask the President as to why he is not releasing our trans detainees who face violence, the crowd began to jeer, boo, and hiss. As she continued, the crowd then began to drown her and chant, “OBAMA! OBAMA!”

A transgender woman of color and undocumented leader in the immigrant rights and LGBT movement was booed and silenced by not only the state, but by the very same movement that purports to uplift and celebrate the transgender community.

As her voice, filled with passion and conviction, broke through the White House room, she was met by negativity, intolerance, and stares of disapproval from her peers. Her voice was carried by the thousands of transgender women considered disposable by the nation, facing deportation, detention, and brutal transphobic violence.

Her voice and visibility in that moment was shunned and shamed as inappropriate by a roomful of leaders who then applauded as the President lamented violence against transgender women of color, violence that his actions have contributed to by not taking action against the detention centers. Her voice is one of few transgender women of color immigrants who are bringing national visibility to this issue of the detention centers. Her voice carried the weight of the communities who are screaming inside detention centers demanding to be freed. Her voice was heard and ridiculed by many who claim to fight for transgender communities and also are involved in LGBT immigrant rights issues.

There is a line in the sand being drawn. Transgender communities have been thrust into the media spotlight, and been asked about our bodies, lovers, histories, and how we see ourselves. The moment we start to engage and raise questions around the state’s transphobic violence, our LGBT community leaders turn their backs and proceed to silence us. Transgender leaders are receiving the message that we are only mere tokens, bodies for entertainment, and accessories to make the spaces of organizing diverse and give the illusion of unity.

As we continue to celebrate and honor trailbrazing transgender women of color in the media and national spotlight, let us also celebrate the transgender women who are imagining a visibility that reaches beyond the borders and the jails and the detention centers that restrict us. Let us show up for these women, and support them as they infuse movements for health access, immigration, and racial and economic justice with their lives and bodies.

Never, ever fall in love with someone who has a common name. Because dear God, it’ll screw you up. You’ll be walking in a mall, minding your business, and hear their beautiful name roll off of someone’s tongue mindlessly. You’ll turn around at a thousand miles per hour hoping to see their face, only to run into a crowd of people with confused expressions. You’ll be watching television, about to doze off, when suddenly that wretched name vibrates through the whole house. You’ll look next to you and all around, but they won’t be there. You’ll even type their name into the search bar just to see it appear all over the screen.

It’ll downright drive you mad. You won’t live a day without seeing or hearing their damned, common name. So don’t you fucking dare fall in love with a Michael or a John or a Robert. If you’re not one to forget or fall out of love with someone very easily, then this will be 100% impossible. I’m telling you right now, it’s the worst decision you could ever make. 10/10 would not recommend.

“The writers themselves, no matter how famous—this before we had any protection from the Writers Guild—were on a very short leash. It may be hard to believe that someone of the caliber of Dorothy Parker or Scott Fitzgerald could actually be hired on a Monday for what sounded like a lot of money—$1,500 a week in the Depression—and pink-slipped on Friday. In those days there was no protection.”

Budd Schulberg, on the Hollywood years. Pictured: Schulberg, with Elia Kazan on the set of A Face in the Crowd, 1956.

youtube

Before Andy Griffith became one of the biggest television stars of the 1960s, he played the lead role in Elia Kazan’s “A Face in the Crowd,” a flick that shows off his range, and then some. It’s nothing like his later roles — as a drunken drifter who gains significant political and cultural influence due to his singing, it has a lot of parallels to today’s insta-famous pop culture. If you’re in the mood for critical reassessment, here’s a good spot to start. *sigh* You’ll be missed, Andy.

A Face in the Crowd

Bequin was the largest city Palarae had to offer. The city’s streets filled with the hustle and bustle of men and women going to and from work every day. Shops lined the market streets, their doors open to any and all potential customers. Vendors stood at stalls, shouting their wares above the crowd. Carts and trams clattered noisily in the business district, transporting merchants, bankers, and the like to their offices to oversee the paper side of their operations. Children capered in the hab district, playing ball and running through the streets under the watchful eyes of grandparents.

Radcliffe pressed through the crowd, the hood of his camo-cloak pulled up over his head. His eyes, though hidden by the fabric to others, missed nothing as they took in the goings on around him. He was hunting. Gavril Praeses was his target. The former Instructor to the House Dumonde was his primary suspect in the attack that had taken place on the school just a few days prior. Now Radcliffe was racing against time to track the man down before he fled the planet.

It had taken several days, but Radcliffe had put together enough clues and vague reports to determine Praeses was still on Palarae and had taken up a residence somewhere in Bequin. As long as he was here, Radcliffe would find him.

The Inquisitor floated his mind out, seeking his partner. See anything? The words floated directly into Shlaereen’s mind.

go-eldarplayer